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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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June 19, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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June 19, 2003
 

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Opinions &amp; Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620040 .k (6rhne Jubliatimt Millard B. Grimes, President Mn HA Pu BLISH/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOaN KtWraDALL ASSOCZATE PUBLSHZR/EoITOR ROB CnAROSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOWN BUSINE&S MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 12. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 We All Know the Truth about DUIs One of my readers called me last week a little upset. Not with me thankfully, but about a column she had read in another newspaper. It seems the columnist was talk- ing about smoking and how many people die from it. The reader was a little upset and wanted to vent. "I'm tired or reading all these columns about smok- ing and how many people it kills," she said. "Not because I'm a smoker, because I don't smoke. However, I've seen so many families destroyed because Of a drunk driver. Statistics show more people die annually due to drunk driving accidents than smok- ing." Well, I'm not sure about the statistics. I must admit I haven't researched them. But I will say that since that con- versation, I've been paying more attention to things per- taining to drunk driving. It is my job to cover police news for our newspapers. Included in that beat are the weekly wreck reports. I began looking at the reports, and I think everyone would be surprised how many of the accidents reported involve a suspected DUI. I was. THE OTHER thing I began doing was watching people more. Last week, I was in a restaurant and sitting in the no smoking section. I observed what was going on at the tables around me. This one couple wag complaining that they had to wait an extremely long time for a non-smoking table to become available. They were also say- ing how all restaurants should become entirely non- smoking and how second hand smoke is so dangerous. I don't disagree with any of that. Really I don't. But I couldn't help but laugh a lit- tle when the couple ordered a drink. Over the course of their meal, the woman had at least three to four glasses of wine and the man had two drinks and a couple of beers. When they left, they walked out of the restaurant, got in their vehicle and drove away. I couldn't help but think about the conversation they had. They were so worried about second hand smoke in the restaurant affecting their health. Of course, we all know it would take a great deal of second hand smoke to affect your health. If you are in second hand smoke every day for long periods of time, it can. But just sitting in a restaurant eat- ing is not going to affect you that much unless you have asthma or some other health problem. Then I thought how iron- ic it was that the couple got into the car and drove away after having several drinks knowing that it would only take one mistake behind the steering wheel to end their life in a matter of seconds. THE TRUTH of the mat- ter is, we all have bad habits. Some smoke, some drink, some eat too much and oth- ers bite their finger nails. It really doesn't matter what it is, we all have those habits that are not good for us, unfor- tunately some are more dead- ly than others. If a person smokes, it will eventually kill them. It takes time, but smoking does kill. If you drink and drive, you are playing Russian Roulette. You might make it home or you might not, you're simply taking a chance. Just like second hand smoke, a person that drinks and drives is also endanger- ing the lives of others. One of my worst fears is to meet a drunk driver on the road. My sister, her husband and two children almost all lost their lives due to a drunk driver years ago. It was a hor- rifying experience to say the least. Luckily, they all sur- vived, but they carry both physical and emotional scars because of the crash today. If you are a smoker, you should respect the non-smok- ers around you. If they ask you not to smoke, then you shouldn't. You should not smoke in public places and above all, you shouldn't smoke in your home around small children. If you are a drinker. Then you shouldn't drink and drive and put other people in jeop- ardy because you like to drink. Honestly, I can accept someone blowing smoke directly in my face much eas- ier than I can tolerate a per- son drinking and getting behind the steering wheel of a vehicle. I make it a habit to report people that drink and drive. THE |IO(;ANSVlIJ,E HOME Nl-;ws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Conlpany, a diviskm ol'Grimes Publications. at )51 Roosevelt High ay, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-04(I. Sub,ription rates by mail: $18 in Tmup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elwhere. Prices !nclude all sales taxes. Perixlical postage paid at HogansviUe. Georgia 30230. FOR SUnSCmPTIONS call (706} 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications. E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. INr<rMAsR: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Asstx:iate Publisher and Editor ............................................................ John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston RobR c 'hardson Assistant Editor ................................................................................... StaffWriters ................ : ............................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryan, Clint Claybrook Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Composing ....................................... Valindalvery Dewayne Fh)wers. Robert :ems Lcgals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulatkm Manager ..................................................................................... Judy Crex s Proo ' " Bobb) Broil Jr. UCtlOn Manager. ..................................................................... : ..... ' Assistant Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pressroom ........................................... Darnell McCauley.Joey Knight, LarD. Colleges CORPOaATE OrFICaS President ............................................................................................. Milkwd B. Grimes Vk'e President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimcs Executive Vice President mid Secretary ........................................ |.aura GAmes Corer Treasurer, ...............................................  ...................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANSVnA HOME NEWS - JUNE 19, 2003 Tennis Can Be So Much Wr/tten in 1978 Two little girls went out to play in the sun one day. One wore a pretty yellow dress. She was tall, and she wore her hair in a pigtail. The other little girl wore blue shorts. She was shorter, and her hair was red. She had many freckles. It was very hot this day. "What should we play?" asked the little girl with the pigtail. "How about tennis?" said the other little girl. "That sounds like fun," said her friend. "I'll serve." Two little girls played ten- nis for a long, long time. The little girl with the pig- tail won the first five games. Her friend won the sixth game, but soon the set was over. The score was 6-1. The little girl with the red hair played much better the second set and won by the same score, 6-1. 'Tet's play one more," she said. "I'll serve," said her friend. The two little girls played on and on. The redheaded girl led 2-0. Then, she lost three straight games. The score became 5-5. Golly, what a neato match. Back and forth and back and forth went the tennis balls. There were crosscourt backhands and down-the-line forehands. There were deep lobs and excellent gets and much top- spin. One time, the little girl with the red hair had a match point against her. She hit a drop-shot winner. Jimmy Connors wouldn't try a drop- shot facing match point. The little girl with the red hair was not old enough to know better. It was very exciting, but suddenly the two little girls weren't haven't as much fun as they thought they would. So tense was the little girl with the pigtail, she began to cry after missing an easy shot. She cried and cried, and she stomped her foot and she contorted her face into an awful shape. The little girl with the red hair did not cry, but when she missed a shot, it hurt her very badly. Once, she hit herself on the head with her racquet because she missed a shot. "Dummy," she muttered to herself. By this time, the two lit- fie girls were covered in per- spiration and their cute play outfits were soaking wet. The sun beat down on them ferociously during the final game. The little girl with the red hair was leading 6-5 and serving for the match. She had three match points, but each time the lit- tle girl with the pigtail sent the game back to deuce. The little girl with the pigtail cried between almost every point. "I wish we had played something else," she thought to herself. Suddenly, it was over. The little girl with the pigtail hit a backhand over the baseline. She said, "Nice match" to her friend and then she cried some more. Many people had gath- ered to watch the two little girls play tennis because they played so well. 'There is prob- ably a quarter of a million dol- lars worth of lessons between them," said a man. Other men made wagers on the outcome of the tennis match between the two little girls who will probably grow up to be millionairesses. The two little girls each received a silver playing so well The with the red hair dish because she match. Her name Hopkins, and she Illinois. Her Hagey They played at the Grant Tennis Atlanta. Margaret because she beat Cari I old girl tennis player i the nation. When was over, she smiled  showed her braces. It was the first time of the two little girls smiled in more tha hours. Wow. Tennis is suchl 2 BY SPECIAL NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LATI BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ ABLEFORSAI. PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOO! WIDE. Remembering 'Jam Up' Jimps Meriwether County and the City of Manchester lost an outstanding citizen and the Cole family lost a loving hus- band, father, grandfather and father in-law with the pass- ing of J.W. "Jimps" Cole last week. I don't know of another person it has been my privi- lege to know and call friend with a more even temper than Jimps Cole. Never have I seen this man get mad and show a temper tantrum. Frankly, if it ever happened, I would not want to be around. Until Jimps' health real- ly got bad a few weeks ago, he was a regular at a down- town coffee club. He would come in with that familiar smile, greet his many friends and assure all of us, he was "jam up." Even in the days we knew he was concerned for his family, he continued to tell everybody he was "jam up." Jam up Jimps he was called. THE FIRST JIMPS Cole I ever knew was our friend's father who had many of the same family mannerisms. Grandfather Jimps Cole lived in the Gay Oakland area of Meriwether County and was serving on the county Tax Assessor's Board when we were building the Veneer Mill in 1959. Grandpa Jimps had the same genuine smile that made you trust him and get to know him better. This smile was to be passed on to a son, a grandson, and I'm sure can be seen in Grandpa Jimps' several great grandchildren now in our midst. I will always remember Grandpa Jimps understand- ing while working out an assessment on Our property that would be fair to us and the citizens of Meriwether County. He had plenty of com- mon sense. It was in the middle six- ties when I got to know J.W. Cole or Jimps, as I always called him. He was keeping books for a mutual friend Robert Hubbard, and we bought an International pick- up from him. SEVERAL YEARS later, Jimps and I were charter members of the Manchester Lions Club and our friendship grew. One experience I cherish was taking our boys camping down on the Flint River in Talbot County. My boys were older than young Jimps, but "''::. '/; ..... ..=:: "}: .":.:  .., a,. :.- ........  "" ...... : ;;.:4 i,:'>. . .. - .: .., :.a, ..:::.:. :. ;oii il . 7::-'. .............. :.?.2!:,!.?,E:':=:': #: :: .. ....... ..... Better Home " .......... ' " " ' ..... <% 2 2_: ,, . .,, '. 7a,:, :' ....... ........ , ............ 5:'. Special Meeting . . .,:::,,  ,::,, ::' ',!', ..,:: .: ?, ?- /": :: :..... ,. : .  :,.,.:. t ......... : :, . .... ; .............. ., ........ ., ,.::,: ..... k,e Otk New,  .7 ....... '=': ...... +,., .::: ,-. ,., a.: , ,: ........ - $CHf:OULE O,  ACtVll'lEea .......... :. :...');:?:. 7.-:':. :': = ........... :" ' E*r " " .. ,. : .... , ' ! % "He would come in with that famil- iar smile, greet his many friends and assure all of us, he was "jam up.'" all Lions and their boys had a great time fishing, playing in the water, and eating and drinking soft drinks until the sun set and crickets began to chirp. My boys and several more the same age finally gave up and they crawled in back of our 1971 station wagon and went to sleep. Young Jimps must have been about six at the time. I remember the youngster crawling up in his father's lap and watching the expressions reflecting from the glowing camp fire going until late in These were great most cherished BLINK YOUR couple of times and Cole girls are pretty: ladies and sonJimps All-State footbaR, Manchester. The day l Jimps signed a with the Georgia was another I also happy to be that signing. dad to Athens University of Georgia he got his degree, lives in the ing in law Clarke County. His dad would tall his children and dren with lots of Whenever one how he was feeling, always reply "Jam thing but of keep you "Jam up." you Jirnps Cole, miss your smile. 50 Years Inthe Hogansville P to the Hogmwllle Home f Judge Phillips Dies At Home William Phillips, well known Troup citizen dies at home on June 10 following an illness of one year. Judge served as a Judge of the Justice of the Peace from 1945 hess. LOCAL CHAPTER OF THE COUNTY RED CROSS The Chapter of the Troup County Red entertained the soldiers at the Red Hospital at Fort Bennin Friday, June 12. Tobacco Prevents Budworm and suckering tobacco will infestations late in the sea:son, say ogists for the University of Agricultural Extension Service. =INSECTICIDES DANGEROUS of the new organic insecticides are gerous to the user, the University of Georgia Extension service. It is very the manufact0rs' precautions be carefully and observed. GEORGIA DEPT. OF 'AWARDS The Department of awarded a Bronze Plauge for achievement. It was awarded for operations and rnent and security work.