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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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June 20, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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June 20, 2002
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JUNE 20, 2002 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62O-O40 ., O;rime Iblulitm Millm'd B. Grlme$, President MIKE HAI PUBUSHFagADxRTIStNG DmECrOR JOHN KUYKOALL Assoctaax PUmaSmR/EDITOR ROB RICHARION ASSISTANT EDrI'OR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSL'E.SS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 t Iogansville. Georgia .30230 Disabled in Area Need Our Help It's amazing sometimes that people (like myself) do not realize that even though we live in a great place with loads of resources., the things we don't have available to us. That is usually because it is something that we personal- ly never have a need for. For instance, this past Friday I received a phone call from a single mother in Harris County, I learned through her and making phone calls, there is no place in our area that provides cer- tain needed health care. The woman has a severe- ly disabled child. The child, although almost 18, has some pretty serious health prob- lems, but those problems have recently been increased two fold or more. According to this mother, the child can not eat or drink by mouth and has to be fed through a tube. That is because of her disability. The child also can not walk, but can crawl and get into things she shouldn't. The child required 24 hour attention. APPARENTLY, THE mother had tried to make pro- visions to make sure this did- n't happen when the child was unattended, but intervention through an outside agency resulted in the child being placed in danger and a moth- er's worst nightmare came true. To make a long story short, the child had to be rushed to a Columbus hospi- tal and was eventually trans- ported to an Atlanta hospital, then back to Columbus. According to the mother, the child almost lost her life three times in a ten week stay. Now, the mother has been told the child will be released from the hospital this week. However, she will require 24 hour a day attention. The mother can't provide the needed attention because of the expense involved. So, it was decided the child would have to be placed in a facili- ty tha t could care for her. The mother learned there was not such a facility near by. She contacted the news- paper office last Friday and expressed concern that there a large number of cases such as this one in this area and there is no facility, other than nursing homes, near by to take care of them. I couldn't believe what I was hearing. We have so many resources in this area. I contacted several govern- mental figures and learned the same thing. A REPRESENTATIVE from Congressman Mac Collins' office did all she could to help the woman, but learned the same thing. There are no such facilities in this area. However, I will say that the Congressman's office went to work immediately and found a facility that would take the child. From what I understand from talk- ing to other people around the state, the facility is a good one. The problem is, the facil- ity is in Milledgeville. While the mother is very gracious for the assistance the Congressman's office has given her, she still is con- cerned because there is no facility in the area to provide such needed services. "I've been told by the hos- pital that there are a great number of cases like mine here," she said. "It would be a tremendous asset to the community if we could have such a facility." The woman has a piece of rental property in Columbus, which she stated needs cer- tain alterations to make it completely handicapped accessible. According to the woman, the home could be used by up to three patients and a full time care giver. I'm not sure what state regulations are regarding such facilities. Nor do I know what type of repairs are need- ed to make the facility work. In the next couple of weeks, I hope to be in contact with State Representatives Vance Smith and Carl Von Epps and see if they can look into the matter more. Any help that could be given to this woman or other families facing such a dilem- ma would be greatly appreci- ated. Fm sure that are people out there that can give of their time and talents to help. Anything that could be done would be greatly appreciated. If you would like to speak to this woman, you may call me at (706) 846-3188 and I'll be happy to give youher name and number. This is really a serious matter. I did not realize that our area was not equipped to handle the medical needs of those who require such atten- tion. However, ff I know the people of this area as I think I do, something will be done to change that. THE HOGANSWILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publisng Company, a division of Gdncs Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230. FOR StICRIFI'IOI' call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications. P. O. Box 426. Manchester. Georgia 31816. POSl"MASq'F.R: Send ',ddress changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. ST Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Asate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne ton Assistant Editor ..................................................................................... .Rob Richardsofl Staff'Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ........................................................................................ hinda Lester Composing ................................................................ J)ewayne Ploweax Valinda hmy Circulation Manager. ................................................................................... Judy Crews Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Presm Manager. ................................................................... :...Wayne Gmchowsi Pressroom ........................................ David Boggs, Larry Colleges. Shannon Akinson OmeoTz  President ............................................................................................. MiU' B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary .......................................................................................... tat Grimes Corer Tmasm ....................................................................................... Kathy s Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Memories of My Father I was on a call-in radio show in Birmingham, AL. When you write a book, they make you travel and do call- in radio shows. Publicity is my life. We were in the second hour in Birminham. A lad.y had complained about some- thing I'd written about Oral Robers, somebody else want- ed to know if I planned to get married again, and then a man called and said he knw my late father. "He taught me in high school in Atlanta," the man said. "He was an unforget- table character." Indeed, a number of peo- ple have contacted me over the years and said they had come across Lewis, St. One such person called and said, "Your daddy owes me $300. I let him borrow it in Kingsport, TN in 1962." After informing the indi- vidual of my father's demise, I asked him, "How long did you know my father before you lent him the $300?" "About an hour," was the reply. "My good man," I said, "you are one of many with the same experience." My father was a lot of things, but more than any- thingelse, he was a soldier. He served in World War II and in Korea. The Purple Hearts and the Bronze Star he earned hang on my office wall. In Korea, his outfit was overrun by the Chinese com- munists. He survived by hid- ing under dead comrades and later by hiding for 16 days in a cave, as his enemy walked about him. When he finally made it back to the American lines, his feet were severly frost- bitten, he was suffering from malnutrition, and he would never agin be the man who went off to war a second time in 1950. He returned home to Fort Benning. I was four. He drank heavily. He screamed in te night. Eventually, he left my mother and went AWOL and spent the rest of his life roam- hag and drinking and living off his considerable charm. I have no idea how many different jobs my daddy held between the time he left the army and his death in !970, but somehow he always man- aged to be able to get a teach- ing position whenever he wanted one. "Your daddy," the man on the radio told me, "would make us laugh with all his car- ryings-on, and he would tell us about what happened to him in the war." "And the thing I remem- ber most was how he used his experience to teach us never to give up no matter how bad things looked. "He said there were times in Korea he felt it would just be easier on him to die than Following Directions Can be There have been count- less times parents, especial- ly dads, have struggled with the assembly of a child's new toy. On Christmas Eve many a frustrating night has been spent trying to determine which piece goes where and with what fastener. Then, after a couple of hours of lit- tle success, the frustrated father picks up the instruc- tions to see what the manu- facturer has to say. Finally, after following the directions, the toy is complete. Not fol- lowing the directions in the assembly of a toy may not have serious consemiuences, but not following the direc- tions in the training of a child can and will be disastrous. If it is wise to consult the man- ufacturer in the assembly of a toy, would it not be just as wise to consult the manufac- turer of our children? A good while ago my son Jason and I were invited by another fellow to go see the Atlanta Braves play. We enjoyed ourselves and even experienced something that very few in the state of Georgia have experienced in recent years, rain. As we wait- ed for the rain to stop and play to resume, I noticed some- thing very disturbing. The young people that were there simply ran loose without any supervision at all. The behav- ior of one particular group caught my attention. Their behavior wasn't such to cause the field officials to eject them from the stadium, but their behavior was such that some parents ought to have taken action. But, no parents were to be found. Many times we hearafter a child has got- ten into serious trouble, "Where did I go wrong?" My question is, "Did you follow the directions?"There are young people today who have come under serious attack. This attack has been leveled because of teen smoking, teen alcohol and drug abuse, teen sexual misconduct and a variety of other things. While these actions are inexcus- able, the blame is not all to be laid upon the young people. The responsibility for the instruction and discipline of children lies with the parents, especially the father. The Bible says in Ephesians 6:4, "And, ye fathers, provoke not your children to wrath: but bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord." Ifweare going to seea change in the behavior of our nation's youth, we must follow the directions.One time, a parent went to a wise old preacher, and asked him, "When is a good time to start instructing and traming my young son?" The preacher asked, "How old is the child?" The moth- er said, "He is five years old." The preacher looked at the quiring mother and said, "Ma'am, you are five years 50Yea00 i00hr Ho mmm to live in in. "He told us how his were swollen and and how he was afraid move in that ( enemy might find him. he said he just mind he wasn't going to out there, and that's pulled him through." We'd been on the long but he had more. "I was in Vietnam said. "I was left behind in a hot zone. was coming back for rne if the enemy would But I hid myself and I on and got out of there. "I wasnted to father. If Captain could make it, I told so could I. I give for my being alive today. was a great man." I thanked the caller( more time -- for best gift I'd ever had. dren oftentimes begins late. When a child teenager and then dad to train him, he will hard time, but if the trained as a baby, then training will be met with resistance and more success. In 2 3:15 Paul said that had been Scriptures from a word child in that refers to a or infant. May we training and instructing  children, it is imperative t we begin while infants. that a child does ty of his first five years of life. not waste those most sionable years giving children's training. But as parents who and care for the heritage  has blessed us with, train them up by the directions God has aS. In the teRm/ Kee, age Grantville, died at the County HospRal from a sawmill Ga. He was riding on the when he fell off and of the truck (went) over chest. al *The Hogansville Demonstration Club was held June 18 at the school buildiung, Mr. Hogan, in charge. Mrs. Rosser, chairman of the ing committee, had the which was a dms rev. Guy wore a sun suit made his grandmother, Mrs. Mathev.. There was a father's dinner given tree at the A.M.E. church, the Julia Hope-Mills' Revue: The second haft of 1 program, featured a barnyard scene. *Mh died Tuesday aftemo 3 p.m. as a result whk:h was ed. tlel news story describing showing of Wh a Song in Head estly noted, qiever in ry of motion pictures , seen such a mighty perso vacade unfold before delighted eyes and earsF