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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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June 22, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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June 22, 2000
 

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I THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 | ., (grhnc ublkatian Milla B. Grimes, President MIKE HALE PUBIASI IERIADVERTISING DIRECFOR JOHN KUYKENDALL _qS(K'IATE PU BIASI IILR/EI)rFoR BRYAN GE:rER AS.S(;IATF EI)ITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINFkSS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 I Iogansville, Goorgia 30230 Water Vio la tio ns A Serious Matter Most water systems around the state are asking citizens to adhere to a volunteer outside water ban. Some are not impos- ing severe punishments for vio- lators, while others issue pretty hefty fines and even jail sen- tences. Spending six months in prison for using water seems a bit harsh, but some cities around the state use stiff fines and jail or prison sentences to enforce water bans. Georgia has been hard hit by drought this season. In the local area, rainfall is down this year by almost 11 inches. Already this month the local area is down by more than one and a half inches. THE DROUGHT has forced the state and some county and city water systems to impose bans on water usage. While some sys- tems are not enforcing the bans as stringently as others, they are all taking the bans very serious- ly. Most city systems m'.e follow- ing the state ban that encourages use on Oddd' +days by dif- ferent residents. In other words, people will be allowed to use the water outside on plants, but they can only do it on odd or even days dictated by house numbering. If you have an odd house num- ber, you will be allowed to use the water on odd days, even house numbers will use it on even days. Some systems are using more stringent bans. For example, Clayton County will enforce a very strict water ban and will charge strong fines and even jail and prison sentences to residents who violate the ban. In Clayton County, a 10 a.m. until 10 p.m. water ban is in effect. The county has even set up a "snitch line" so neighbors can report each other for violating the ban. If someone is caught violat- ing the ban, they will be mailed a letter by Clayton County and have 12 hours to respond to the ident does not respond, the city can charge them a fine of up to $500 or a six-month prison sen- tence. WHILE THIS may seem harsh to many of us, I'm not so sure it is. Water is essential for the survival of all life on earth. If we don't have it, we won't sur- vive. I like being able to take a bath any time I like rather than hav- ing a dictated time to do so. When you work the crazy hours of a newspaper person, sometimes you may be showering at 3:00 am. I like watchdng children play with the water hose during those hot summer days. However, if the drought continues and people don't adhere to the bans, we may all be turned off for certain hours of the day. Suppose the volunteer bans being issued now by the water systems doesn't work. If people continue to use the water as they please and the levels continue to drop, then new steps would have to be taken to ensure everyone has water. The most efficient way would be to turn the water on at five or six in the morning and turn it off again around 10 a.m. Then, they could turn it back on around 8 p.m. at night and shut it down at 11 p.m. Wouldn't that stink. I would encourage all citizens to comply with the volunteer water bans being imposed by the state and local water systems, if not, you may be in for a manda- tory ban. And while you are using the ban, pray for rain. We welcome your ideas... If you would like to give us some suggestions about your weekl3 newspaper; just drop us a line at: The Hogansville Home News EO. Box 426 - ttogansville, GA 30230 TtI: H(X;AINVII,I,E HOMt: Ntzus is published weekly by the Star-Mercu Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publicatious, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway. Mallchc,,ter. Georgia 31816. USFn3 620-040? Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Tmup, Heard or Mcri et ho Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class lstagc paid a! Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR SUlk'RIPTIONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Stm" Meres 3 Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchesler. Gt)rgia 31816. P(XWrMA,rI';R: Send address changes to P. O, Box 426, Hogansville. (;A 3023(!. S'IAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike ttale Associate Publisher and FAitor ................................................................. John Kuykemlall Ass(x:iate Editor .................................................................................................. BiTan Geler Business M+mager ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ......................... De|xrah Smith, Ctum+line Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Buant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda l.ester Director of Photo+aphy ......................................................................... Michael C+ Snider Assistant [itor ........................................................................................... Rob Richm'dson Comlx)sing ..................................................... Valinda h'ery. Deborah Smith, Lanren Kin Legals ................................................................................................................. Valinda lvery Receptionist and Classdicds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Pw, duction Manager ......................................................................................... Roland Foiles Pressnx)m ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski C())RAll,; OFHCIRS President ......................................... : .......................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Secrcu,. ............................................................................................... Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer. ............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett [gal Counsel and Assistmt Secreuuy ..................................................... James S. Grimes OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JUNE 22, 2000 Legacy of the Love of H The last of a special breed of folk is dead. There were twelve of them born to my paternal grandparents, Mama and Daddy Grizzard, of rural Gwinnett County, Georgia. My father was the youngest. He's been gone twenty years. Aunt Nell was the oldest. She's been gone a long time, too. Three of my late uncles were unforgettable characters. Walt and Wesley Grizzard were in the used-car business. They had Grizzard Motors, and they were wily veterans of the trade. They were both big men with big voices, and very few cus- tomers escaped unsold when they stepped onto the lot. "We're the walking man's best friend," my Uncle Wesley used to say. MY UNCLE FRANK was a lawyer. My father took me to see him perform in the courtroom once. I was maybe twelve. Uncle Frank was defending a man on a charge of making moon- shine. As he addressed the jury, a woman seated behind the defen- dant broke into hysterical tears. Uncle Frank went into his client',; military history, pleading with the jury to realize he had "fought on the bald hills of Korea." And the woman sobbed on. It took ten minutes for the jury to render a verdict of Innocent. As we walked out of the court- room, my father said to Uncle Frank, "that sure was pitiful about the man's wife." "Your client's wife," said my father. "It sure was pitiful the way she cried." "That wasn't his wife," said Uncle Frank. "It was just an old girl I paid fifty dollars to come here and squall." THE LAST of thetwelve was my Aunt Rufie. She died last week in suburban Atlanta. She was eight-four. She and my father were close. My parents divorced when I was six, and when I would visit my father in Atlanta, we would usu- ally wind up at Aunt Rufie's house. "Death brings survivors togeth- er, regardless of hqw far they mtght have drift- ed apart." Daddy would play her piano and sing. I loved that house because of the laughter that was always in it. When my father fell on hard times during the last ten years of his life, it was my Aunt Rufie who stood by him the strongest. "I could never turn my back on my baby brother," she often said to me when after his death. I'M GOING to be a er at Aunt Rufie's see some cousins I in years. Death brings together, regardless of they might have my uncles and aunts, to me when I was a child. I lived with my didn't see them that when I did, it was always al experience. The legacy they left the love of humor. There one of them who en a room, and I'm still great deal of their material AMAN come up year's ago at a public and said, "I grew up with and all his brothers When folks got just to cheer them up." That's my heritage. be prouder of it. FDR Suffers an Embarrassing (Another in a series) President Roosevelt took an embarrassing fall at the Demo- cratic National Convention in 1936, which was held in the University of Pennsylvania's football stadium at night. He was advancing to the platform to deliver his accep- tance speech, walking stiff- legged through a throng of peo- ple, holding the arm of his son James, accompanied by sever- al 'aides and bodyguards. He saw the elderly, whit,e- bearded p0am in the crowd and waved to him. Markham thought the President wanted to shake his hand, so he reached for him. At that moment he was shoved against James, who fell against his father. - The weight of the two Roosevelts caused the right leg brace to come unsnapped. The President fell, throwing his arms up for balance, sending the loose pages of his speech scattering. Reilly caught him under the arm just before he hit the ground. Gus Gennerich snapped the brace lock in place. Roosevelt was righted, "white and worried...badly shak- en," according to Reilly. "Clean me up," the President snapped. "Okay, let's go." Then he saw Markham, crying because of the fall he caused. Roosevelt smiled, shook Markham's hand, and then walked to the stand to the cheers of 100,000 unknowing Democrats. His speech pages were out of place and he had to arrange them as he spoke, while giving perhaps his most memorable oration, concluding with his declaration, "This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with history." ACCORDING TO Roose- velrs physician, Admiral Ross McIntire, some reporters inthe press section saw the fall. If they did, they chose to ignore it. A perusal of many news accounts of the next day pro- duces no mention of.a fall: H.L. Mencken wrote in the Baltimore Sun that the President's delivery of his speech was once uncertain - a fact that was due, whether Mencken knew it or not, to the hurried and imperfect recollec- tion of the text's pages - but other accounts missed even that. The fact that there were so few "health" stories in the gen- eral press led tosome suspicions of the Washington press corps. Leonard Fowler, editor of the Fox Valley (Illinois) Mirror, charged that there was "a con- spiracy to remain mute con- cerning the infirmities of the President." He Said the excuse was "we should not take advantageof a sick man, [but] a physical crip- ple is inclined to become an emotional and spiritual cripple." This charge that Roosevelt's lameness per se was no issue but that it affected his mind- was typical of the attacks that ease to be made on Roosevelt. Newspapers, saga- "Roosevelt was the subject of what has been called the,most persistent, vicious whispering cam- paign in modern times." zincs and the broadcasting industry were not the media that carried on this campaign, but rather the specialized pub- lications and whispering cam- paigns. Roosevelt was the subject of what has been called the most persistent, vicious whispering campaign in modern times. Fowler's point was a belief widely shared about victims of poliomyelitis at the time. But it was a belief almost diametri- cally opposite the truth. While there were varieties of person- ality reactions and adjustments to being so afflicted, the large majority of polios had happy and pleasant outlooks on life. Every visitor to Warm Springs noticed that. Roosevelrs family and closest friends who wrote made the point that he almost never despondent the first few months affliction. IN ANSWER to the that 1: Kitchens asked test this theory i once, by taking a Roosevelt could of 25 names of the sort learns in high school thinks of again. . A third mistaken about men who have of the sort Roosevelt had: they are sexually There were rumors to effect then. James said in a 1976 book father was so affected. But the physician! examined him for the article in 1931 said he Physicians and knew Roosevelt at Springs also say that he' although it is that he was celibate crippled years. (Next week: More about FDR's health.) 'THE SQUIRE OF 'THE OF WARM SPRINGS TLE WHITE HOUSE. IT TAINS ALL OF THE REPRINTED IN THIS PER DURING THE PAST PROCEED SALE ALL GO TO SEVELT CENTER. What To Do With Our Burdens After the invitation to last Sunday night's service, the peo- ple in that service began to give testimonies. Those testimonies were filled with praises and smiles for the goodness and grace God has shown upon their lives. But, those hearts who were filled with the praises of God, were also carry- ing heavy loads and hearts began to break and tears began to flow. There were tears for family and friends who are unsaved, bro- ken hearts for family and friends out of God's will or struggling with a great need. Mothers, fathers and grandparents became broken over their children and grandchildren. IT BECAME quite evident that a lot of people were carry- ing heavy loads. At one time or another in our lives, we face those times when burdens enter our life. Why is it though that some people seem to go on with no prob- lem and others seems to fall apart? When those burdens do enter our life what can we do? The Apostle Paul,was a man who knew what burdens were. He had a burden for lost gentiles, he had a heart that would give up his own salvation for his fellow Jews if it were possible. Much can be learned about burdens from the Apostle Paul. In Galatians 6:2, we find that some burdens are to be shared. Paul said, "Bear ye one another's burdens, and so fulfill the law of christ." As Christians and members of the church, the body of Christ, we are to each other bear one another's burdens. Simply put, Paul tells us that we are to help each other carry the load. Too often our lives get so filled with self that we forget there are those around us who are hurting or fac- ing a great trial. There are times when we need to think of the needs of others before our own self. Someone once said, "A man wrapped up in himself makes a very small pack- age." Today may be seek to help someone carry the load they are called upon to bear. Still in Galatians 6, Paul tells us something else we can do with our burdens. He says, in verse 5, "For every man shall bear his own burden." Not only are some bur- ',A burden for the lost ts a bur- den that we all should shoulder." dens to be shared, but some bur- dens are to be shouldered. There are some things in our lives we need to carry. One such burden would be a burden to see folks get saved by the grace of God. There were times when the altars of our churches would be flooded with the tears of saints who were bro- ken over someone on their way to hell. IT SHOULD break our heart to know that some of our own fam- ily, some of our own friends, neighbors or unsaved. A burden for a burden that we der. Our tears are " that our tears are tle, and as one song "Tears are a language stands." When is the last became broken over a dying and going to hell? SOME BURDENS shared, others are to be dered still others are "Cast thy burden upon and he shall sustain thee. all your care upon hi, careth for you." There burdens we can cast of Jesus and think nothing  them. There are many walking loads that should be of the Savior. of those carrying a Him care for it and And no matter who we we care for someone to help them carry their: