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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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June 24, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
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June 24, 1999
 

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OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JUNE 24, 1999 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS A ($ri., ubliatio, Millard B. Gdrnes, President USPS 620-040 MIl PtIJSH ER/ADX%RTISING DIRECIDR JOHN KAIL ASSOCIATE PUBI JSHER/ED1TOR MARION (Tin) SMrm MANAGING EDrlOR/TFHNICAI, DIRECqOR WnEk, r BUSlNF&S MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Honsilie, Georgia 3o2,3o Official Legal ()qapl ('m' of Hog, lmxilh, The Lord's Hammer "O, for a beaker full of the warm South..." - John Keats The Southern summer is upon us again and this year - my ninth year here in the land of heat, humidity, fleas and fire- flies - it doesn't seem so bad; but then, it's only June... Southern people have no idea how intense- ly deleting their summers are - a sweaty, sweltering endurance test for those of us raised in more temperate states; survival is not guaranteed. There is an art to getting through a Southern summer, which is learnable given patience, time and A/C. There is also an art to living amongst Southern peo- ple, when Southern is some- thing you will never be . :. - It is the heat and the humid- ity. Just because Southern peo- ple are nice to you, does not mean that they genuinely like you. And, it can be more than 90 degrees in the shade. - There is nothing quite as good as pound cake or biscuits made by a Southern woman from an old family recipe. Tea does taste better sweet. "Coke" is a term that can be applied to many types of drinks. Okra, in all forms, is disgusting; so are Lorin Sinn- Clark I Columnist the best things ever made; so, are ceiling fans. The sweet scent of honeysuckle, wisteria and gardenias can be genuine- ly intoxicating, especially on an early morning or late evening breeze. - Look a "the mama" before you marry, if it's true love that you seek. Even the cutest liT ole' Georgia peach can lose that shine after a youngun' or two. Her mama's appearance may well tell the tale. - Southern communication is subtle and complex. You can sit at a Southern table all day and not hear a thing that's real- ly been said. Beware f the phrase, "Bless your heart." It usually proceeds bad news, an insult or reprimand. - Give up being in a hurry if you're going to live here. Things move as slow as molasses in January all 12 months of the greens, Most food.tastes bet .... ter fried. And, (col) slaw can Yeaq6ne. most  :'! "'v zasci/ating part be served on almost anything. - There are no manners as good as Southern manners. These people really mean it (kids included) when they say "Sir" and "Ma'am" so respect- fully. You won't see a room full of ball-cap bearing college boys stand up when an adult enters the room anywhere else. And, there's a good bit of power in a prompt "Thank You" note. - Unless you are from here, it's probably better not to try and say, "y'all." It'll probably come out sounding like you're making fun of Southerner is not something one does in the South. Never even insinuate that a Southerner has been rude for rude is the one thing they will not ever be. - "Trash" - the human kind - does exist. It comes in all sizes, shapes, colors and economic groups; and, likc kudzu, it is best kept out of your life. - You don't know the mean- ing of wet until you've been caught in a Southern rain, no umbrella in sight. And, you don't know the meaning of sweat until you've worked out- side all day in the Southern sum- mertime. - Turn signals don't tell you much here. Most of the time they're on when that car is going straight or off when that car's about to turn. Also, give up the idea of turning right on a red light. It ain't gonna' happen 'round here. - Lightning bugs are one of about life in the South, howev- er, is the paradox and contrast - so intense it's like going in and out of the A/C from the heat. There's the parity between the unfailing need to be proper and the unabashed acceptance of eccentricity - the need to keep up proper appearances in the face of such strangeness that you wonder how no one else seems to see... There's and edge to living here (inspired by the heat, bugs and humidity?) that lends itself to storytelling and acceptance of even the strangest twists in reality. Perhaps that's why, as time goes on, I find yself increasingly able to face these summers in the South. There's a manic magic to life here you simply can't find anywhere else - the pure predictability of the unpredictable - a uniquely Southern combination of the subtle and sublime. (Lorin Sinn-Clark is an award-winning columnist for the Barrow Eagle, a Grimes Publications newspaper in Winder). THE HOGANSqlJ.E HOME NEWS is published weeldy by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by marl: $15 in Meriwether, Talbot or Harris Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR stnscmmnoNs call (706) 846-3188 or Tite to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. P(.s'rEm Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, Georgia 30230. Straw Publisher and Advertising Director .......................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ...................................................... John Kuykendall Managing Editor ad Technical Director ......... . ...................... Marion (Ted) Smith Business Manager ............................................................................. 1 eeAnn W'dbert Associate Editors .............. Billy Bryant/Talbotton, Michael Snider/Harris County Dan Stout/HogansviUe, Caroline Yeager/Greenville Advertising Sales ............................................................. Laurie Lewis, Linda Lester Photography ......................................................................................... Michael Snider Features ...................................................................................................... Lani A. Pike Composing ......................................................................... Valinda Ivery, Dori Green Lagals ....................................................................................................... Valinda Zvery Receptionist and Classifieds .................................................................... Cleta Young Pressroom .............................................................. David Boggs, ayne Grochowsld COm'ORATE OFFtCERS President ............................................................................................... Millard Grimes Vice President ........................................................................ ,......Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ......................................... . ............................................. Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer ................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ........................................... James S. Grimes The Many Perils of Home Don't ever open your mouth to your wife about how things need to change around the house. In fact, don't open your mouth period. This sage advice comes from one who has sinned by bringing to her attention that our kitchen and bathroom have not seen change since KC and the Sunshine Band had a num- ber one hit. It only took one comment before the plans were laid, and things started to appear on the kitchen table like rolls of ani- mal wallpaper for accent touch- es. You can ask my shop teacher, Mr. V.R. Stephens if you want, but I've never pretended to be a handyman. Of course, since my wife proofs a lot of what I write she knows that I'm the only guy in shop class that actu- ally fell for the old "left hand- ed hammer" routine. We decided the smart thing to do was get a recommenda- tion from someone whom we trust. There was no one better than good-old-boy Gene, of Gene's Tree Service, to ask. You see, Gene built the fence around our backyard to make sure we could go swimming in our pool without the entire neighborhood seeing us, and also joining us, especially their kids. Only problem is Gene put the planking on the wrong side; but we all can make mistakes. He did a great job taking down our trees lhough, and one of them was actually a tree I selected to come down. When we asked for a rec- ommendation for someone to do interior decoration, he said, "That ain't no:pbblem iff. '', There's this old boy, Dave; I know his daddy. He'll do you a good job." Well, that was good enough for us. Now we had an inside track to someone we could depend on to do it right. We gave Dave a call the next Improvement day and he said he'd be right oven That was fast, and now I know why. He showed up with his wife and two kids. I don't remember asking him to bring the family. Anyway, he was ready to go right then, but we decided an estimate was the best way to start. He measured everything in the kitchen. Smut, the cat, is exactly 16 1/2 inches long, if you don't count her tail. After he finished he told us he'd go and get the new count- er tops ordered, the new ceiling light covers, and paints. It sounded good! Of course my wife made sure to clear up a few little details with him, like he should make sure he sanded the cabi- nets before painting, because we decided not to replace them. He was Johnny-on-the-spot, say- ing,"Yes ma'am, we aim to please. Me and my daddy done been in business for years and ain't never had no complaints. You can ask Gene. Why, i been knowing Gene since I was about six years old, and he can tell you exactly what I can do." It was an interesting story, but we had to interrupt. We were afraid that if we let him finish it would be bedtime for his kids before he could leave. The first day Dave was there exactly as he said he would, and worked hard for all of three hours banging stuff, moving things and splashing paint all over the new ceiling light, tiles and our fairly new carpet. If the coral paint matched those things I guess it wouldn't .R Jim Dale Columnist have been so bad. His wife made a feeble attempt at cleaning the carpet with a broom. Okay, so he isn't perfect. He actually sanded one cab- inet, I saw him do it. When he took the doors to the cabinet home with him to paint, I was skeptical, but when he returned them they looked pretty good except for the places he missed. But, that was two days later. One of his kids got sick, and what- ever it was, Dave got it too. Then it was an emergency job for someone e!se. Then for two more days we heard nothing. It was getting pretty close to our vacation, and he had promised to get finished before we left. We pointed this out when we finally reached him by phone. So he farmed the kids out and he and his wife spent the weekend with us. Finally, he fin- ished the kitchen, even though my wife found a lot to touch up; so we left on our trip. When we returned we found the Venetian blinds that Dave had reinstalled before we left had a piece sitting out on the counter. Now, I know I've taken things apart and put them back together with fewer parts than they originally had, but Dave ...... , I ,V Don't ever open your mouth to your wife about how things need to change around the house. In fact, don't open your mouth period. does this kind of thing for a ing. I managed to find out the piece went, after taking blinds down and the apart. Dave hadn't done the white paint under 1 ets proved it. The trim around the windows and baseboards also indicated maybe Daveeither didn't them or ran out of paint. Anyway, he owed us room counter and we called him, not knowing he had left town or just say, "Who are you again?" he did come back. This time he brought wife and only one of his Ite told us he meant to stay he was to get some fresh linen out we'd make the bed in the bedroom. You see, Dave n't do anything fast. He finished in one think I know how he did it There was still a shadow on wall, where a picture hun the bathroom, that was posed to be painted. Do know that if you dark ICes you cover 1 Dave dances back in to the ing room and his ability to get Home to mix paint is so good that can't even tell the between the paint on the room walls and the new just bought. He managed to paint walls in record time, and recreate the shadow from old paint. Isn't it amazing? this point we just wanted to go, so we paid him and Do you want to know came over so fastto I don't: believe Dave has, many repeat customers. Now, if someone would kind enough to send me Stephens' telephone need to talk to him about to redo my kitchen and rooms. Bullochville Becomes Warm Springs (Seventh in a series). Eleanor Roosevelt went back to New York shortly after her husband was settled in the Hart cottage. Missy LeHand stayed to help him with some work. He was writing politi- cians around the country, and doing some work for Fidelity and Deposit. Basil O'Connor, whom Roosevelt had gotten to know at 120 Broadway 'and with whom he was negotiating about forming a new law partnership, apparently came down to con- clude that discussion. Otherwise, Roosevelt devot- ed his time to swimming and working out in the pool twice a day, for an hour or more. Other times, he'd relax at cards, chat with the few people who remained at the hotel or in cab- ins, and with the town's gossipy mailman. Sometimes, he'd ride about the countryside. Loyless drove him in a car which some coun- ty business and political lead- ers provided. He attended at least one large cocktail party at the resort and went to a civic club meeting in Manchester. He also attended a ceremo- ny at which the town's name of Bullochville was , officially changed to Warm Springs. Perhaps with a joking refer- ence to that, Loyless later told Roosevelt that he "certainly put Warm Springs on the map." But what he really had reference to was something that did more than a name change to make Warm Springs well known. Almost two weeks after Roosevelt arrived in Georgia, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal took the two-hour trip down from Atlanta. His editor, Jack Cohen, was an active Democrat. He knew of Roosevelt and may have talked with him about Warm Springs at the New York convention. At any rate, Gregory interviewed Roosevelt, observed his work- outs, then wrote a Sunday sup- plement article for his paper. Because of the effect of the arti- cle and because it is such a good first-hand account, it is worth quoting at length. "Franklin D. Roosevelt, New York lawyer and banker, Assistant Secretary of the Navy during the World War, and Democratic nominee for Vice President in 1920, is literally swimming his way back to health and strength at Warm Springs, Georgia..." After reviewing Roosevelt's medical history, Gregory con- tinued: "Mr. Roosevelt and Mr. Loyless, in adjoining cottages, are the only residents of the dozen or more small cottages surrounding the Warm Springs hotel at the present time. The hotel has closed for the winter season... The distinguished vis- itor has the large swimming pool to himself two hours or more each day... "He swims, dives, uses the swinging rings and horizontal bar over the water and finally crawls out on the concrete pier for a sun bath that lasts anoth- er hour. "Then he dresses, has lunch, rests a bit on the delightfully shady porch, and spends the afternoon driving over the countryside, in which he is intensely interested... "'I am deriving wonderful benefit from my stay here,' Mr. Roosevelt said. 'This place is great. See that right leg? It is the first time I have been able of Warm to move it at all in three years.' Mr. Roosevelt does not attrib- ute any medicinal effects to the Warm Springs water, but he gives the water credit for his ability to remain in it for two hours or more, without tiring in the least, and the rest of the credit for his improvement is given to Georgia's sunshine. "'The best infantile paraly- sis expert in New York told me that the only way to overcome the effects of the disease was to swim as much as possible and bask in the sunlight.Conditions here are ideal for both pre- scriptions. The water in some way relaxes muscles drawn taut by the disease and gives the limbs much greater action. The sunshine has curative effects, I understand.' "So marked have the bene- fits been in his case, Mr. Roosevelt plans to return to Warm Springs in March or April and remain two or three months. At that time he will build a cottage on the hilltop..." As if that description were not enough to attract polio suf- ferers everywhere to Warm Springs--how that sentence about moving his right leg for the first time in three years must have leapt from the page!--Gregory concluded by saying that George Foster Peabody, his nephew Charles Peabody, and Tom Loyless planned to spend "millions" to create a "year-round health resort" there. The article appeared only in the Journal but everywhere after the syndicated it. In some pers, the curatiw swimming were or rather exaggerated, by ing the Roosevelt article "bathing beauties" including Annette a famous swimmer, who supposedly been cured polio's aftereffects by ming. Immediately the began to pour into the Springs post office from and their facilities for the coming men And not only mail. Roosevelt came back to Springs on April 1, 1925, it to a town that was beginning t attract hopeful cripples all over the country. One was Fred Botts erous young man Elizabethville, who would remain in Springs as registrar of Georgia Warm Foundation. His role in the affairs of the foundation, pl his active participation in social life of the foundation l Thanksgiving and on presidential visits--and round--were enough to him a legend, but assured him " celebrity repeating at public event slightly exaggerated about Botts's arrival at Springs. According t Roosevelt bony he sank. But taught him how to begin swim back to health. (Next week: Warm fame grows.)