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Manchester, Georgia
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June 26, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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June 26, 2002
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62O-O40 A Grimes blicaon MIII B. Gd, MInE HA PUBLISHER]ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/FrroB RoB RIN ASStSrANT EDrrOR JAYNE GOIJOSIN Busmss MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 HogansxaUe, Georgia 3O230 Not All Salads Are Created Equal.... As many of my weekly readers know, I quit smoking about 18 months ago. Since that time, I've gained some weight. While others say, "You're not that big," I cer- tainly feel like I am. I've learned though, that watch- ing your weight is about as easy as quitting smoking. Because of my work schedule, I really don't have time to walk every day, or go to the gym, or do any of those things. So, I've tried very hard to cut back and do the exercises that I can. I do about 200 sit-ups each night, but I still have a spare tire around my waist. Some of that is age I know, but a lot of it is simply my eating habits. Like all southerners, I love fried foods, starchy foods and, of course, dessert. It is comforting to know that in this day and age, I'm not the only person that battles the weight problem, nor the eating on the run problem. MOST AMERICANS today are always dn the go and their diet reflects that. e grab a burger, fried chick- n, whatever to get us by, =very seldom even eat dinner at home any more, like most Americans, the hectic work life and multitude of activi- ties have destroyed the tra- ditional family dinners as well. So, those quick meals are now a three time a day thing for most Americans. Funny, when I was a young man, I ate breakfast at home, lunch at school and dinner at home. Today, ff I eat a meal at home one night a week it's a surprise for me. The fast food restaurants are tryingto help us out tbougk Most of them today offer lower corie alternatives, but you still have to be careful. That low calorie meal may not be low calorie at all The other day, I had a salad for lunch. I told the waitress to give me extra salad dressing. I only ate one of them, boy was I glad. While the salad was good for me and low in calories, the salad dressing sure wasn't. It con- tained 11 grams of fat. We must be careful when looking for low-cal alterna- tives in fast food restaurants. We might just find that the choices we thought were low- cad or good for us, just sim- ply aren't. When choosing your meal, pick one that contains a low calorie count and fat. Don't forget to check the fiber content as well. The next time you decide to grab one of those fast meals, keep these few tips in mind tO help you eat a little more healthy: Remember that not all salads are created equal!! - You must remember that just because a meal has a base made of lettuce, it does not necessarily mean it's a healthy choice. All those lit- tle extras you love on your salad, make it a high-ca! meal. If you load that salad down with cheese, eggs, croutons, meat, etc. you've added a lot of calories. Also, be sure to go light on the dressing and (when possible) make sure you are using a low-cal, low in fat dressing. PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS 27, 2002 In Speaking of Time and B A friend of mine became a father for the first time last week. He's even older than I am. Yesterday, we were sit- ring on the front porch of the fraternity house drinking beer. Today, he's got a son. I remember what folks used to say: "lord, where does the time go?" I didn't understand them then. I do now. So we talked about his kid. "He's got far more hair than I do," said my friend, whose bald spot showed up four or five years ago. "How big was he when he was born?" I asked. "Eight pounds, eleven ounces. He's going to be a big iun. ,, "Did you get to hold him right after he was born?" "Yeah, I had to scrub up, and then I got to hold him. That's when I really realized I had a son. That's when the bonding really takes place between a father and son." WE NEVER TALKED about it, but I always assumed my friend had his heart set on a boy child. He's an ex-jock who still is competitive as ever on a tennis court, the golf course or in his den throwing darts. He had a wild streak in him when he was younger, and a lot of lovely ladies stood by with broken hearts and watched him go. He was the best dancer who ever shagged to "Stubborn Kind of Fellow" back in school. He drove a red 1950 Chevy convertible and voted for Barry Goldwater. After school, he flew air- planes, went to a war, went into business and built a home the size of a small town. A man like that wants a son. HIS WIFE WANTED him in the room with her when she bore him his child. "I guess you were pretty happy when you saw it was a boy," I said to him. "It wasn't like that," he said. "My thoughts were more with my wife than with anything else. She was a trouper" "You mean she was in a lot of pain?" "Let me put it to way -- if it were up you to have babies, wouldn't be very around." I was imF concern for his wife precedence over else. Knowing him, me, knowing how much a would mean to him. ing the general .I entering life. One where a man to peace with himself the wind to move him ani and he knows, without that in wife and child he the only treasures that ly matter anyway. I used to laugh at Now, I'm jealous of it. Lord, where go? Taking a Peek Beyond Death's The other evening while watching a religious news broadcast, a reporter was fol- lowed through the streets of a major U.S. city. This reporter approached sever- al young men and women appearing to range from 20- 30 years old and asked this question, "What do you think will happen after you die?" The answers varied from I don't know, to I don't care, to nothing, to reincarnation. The portion of the reporter's survey I watched did not show anyone with a scriptur- al view of life after death. That subject has fascinated and puzzled people for liter- ally hundreds of years. The Fat Alert! Fat Alert! - oldest book in the Bible is When you see or hear the nmMhlwthahtwlraf.Inh and word "fried,"'a little alarm mtat'Tck ttle' mestionis qu should go off in your head asked, "If a man die shall he live again?" (Job 14:14) Is it possible to know the truth about what happens beyond death's door? Can we know what will happen to us once we depart this life? One of the most impor- tant things a person needs to know about death is the mean- ing. Contrary to the thinking of some, death is not a cessa- tion of existence. The bibli- cal idea of death is separa- tion. Although when we see a person die and the physical 5O that says, "Fat, fat and more fat." Stay away from those crispy, crunchy or battered items. You should opt for baked, broiled, steamed or roasted. Keep It Simple - Add fla- vor to your meal without adding all those calories. Be sure and choose dressing and sauces that are low in calo- ries. You may also want to buy some spices at the gro- cery store that are low in calo- ries and keep them in your purse or briefcase. Think Fiber First! - It's best to base your meal on fiber food such as a baked potato or salad. However, stay away from things like sour cream, guacamole, etc. because they add calories. Imtead, used low fat cottage cheese or salsa. ItAin't A Real Vahm! - Beware of the "value meaAs." They might save you a dol- lar, but the health costs can be high. Instead, order a kid's meal. Kid's meals have the perfect portions when you want the taste of fast and they don't have the adverse effects of the larger fast meal. A word of thanks to Weight Watchers for provid- ing some of the tips for this column. THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company. a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville. C,orgia 30230. FOR SdClmoenOSS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications. P. O. Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816. POSTMAS'I': Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville. GA 302.30. STAW Publislier and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne G(ddston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWriters ......................................................................... ,Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager .................................................................. Laurie I2wis Advertising Sales ........................................................................................ Umda Lester Composing ................................................................. Dewayne Flowers, Valinda Ivety Circulation Manager .................................................................................... Judy Crews Legals ....................................................................................................... Jayne Golds!on Pressroom Manager. ....................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pressroom ....................................... avid Boggs, Larry Colleges, Shannon Atkinson Clx OfvtcE PresidenL ........................................................................................... A4illard B. Grimes Vice President. ................................................................................. Charlotte S. Secretary ......................................................................................... Laura Grirs Corer Treasurer ........................................................ i .............................. Kathy Grimes Gang! Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Grim life is removed from the body, that person has not ceased to exist. Physical death is a sep- aration of the spirit from the body. Our physical body is simply a dwelling place for the spirit of life. When death occurs, that spirit of life just changes dwelling places. But, not only does the Bible speak of physical death, but it also speaks of spiritual death. Just like physical death, spiritual death is also a separation. This separation is the soul from the presence of God. THE MOST important thing a person needs to know about death is not when they will die, but how. There are only two ways a person may die; a person can di in Christ or they can die withOUt Christ. Matthew 25:46 says, "And these shall go away into ever- lasting punishment: but the righteous into life eternal." To die in Christ is to find Heaven your dwelling place and to die without Christ is to find Hell your dwelling place. To answer the question Job asked thousands of years ago, we must conclude that when this body gives up its life, that life will live some- where. It is reported that in an Indiana cemetery there is a pare for death, and me." Someone that tombstone over a hundred years old bearing this epi- taph: "Pause, stranger, when you pass me by, as you are now, so once was I. As I am now, so you will be, so pre- and etched them, "To follow you, not content, until I which way you went." words are truth. Dr. Merritt said, "The important thing about is not death itself, but follows death." May we, the Word of God and peek at death's door and make necessary preparations. Resident: We've Waited Long Enough for Sewerage To the City of Hogansville: I am a resident of Mountvilie Road. Thirty more the city annexed Mountville Road promising that t dents would be able to have city sewerage. Today, there some 70 homes in this area with no city sewerage. I being done around the city all the time. We pay taxe: like everyone else but don't seem to have the tages of living in the city as other people do. I ask the city to please do what they said they and not start any more projects until this one is I think we have waited long enough. William Joel rS O.,, Ho Inthe to the Hogansville Home NeWS Mac Harden year-old son of Mrs. grandson of H.V. Harden 1 Hogans000000, that made perfect and his grades were an His said of his teacher, Mamhman, =She's mighty She did not whip me one d.ocal Churches Here -The Rev. McGrady, pastor of the Methodist church of for the past five years, returned to begin his secutive year here, with hearty apOause so much accomplished his leadership. Local Kiwanians Program For LaGrange Members of the Kiwanis Clu 0 Hogansville with It. William Trippe cer, presented the weekly meeting of the club of LaGrange held at Colonial Hotel Tuesday. Jackson, accompanied by Bruce Head sang three tions, =kashmir Alone" and "Road to Cancer Driver Prove st be a Success- Crusaders are well on their toward reaching their goal 1952 campaign. According State Chairman Wally made in Atlanta assigned goal of $300,000 reports from county loaders.