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Manchester, Georgia
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June 27, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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June 27, 2003
 

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THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A Grimee iJuhlkatio. Millard B. Gdn=s, President lVIIKE HAI PUBLISHER]ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER]EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846.3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 , P O. Box 426 ttogansville, Georgia 30230 Youth Sports Help Children Develop If you are one of those parents that has a child involved in youth sports, you know first hand how much work is involved. Taking a child to practice several days each week, then to games all the hours spent washing uni- forms, and so on. While it can be very frus- trating and sometimes even down right tiresome, you hang in there and in the back of your mind, it's an outlet for your children. That's not the big picture at all. I coached Little League baseball and football for a number of years and even umpired for a few and I can tell you first hand, the things that youth sports teaches children can not be measured by how much it cost parents nor the time they have to spend at the fields. Each of you in the work- place know how important a team concept in the day-to- day operations of business. It's impossible to get any- thing done if you don't work as a team. Children learn the team concept early in youth would not be a true statement. Nor, is it true that children that participate in sports always turn out to be good lit- tle boys and girls. However, I know from personal expe- rience with my children and the children I've coached, overall most children that participate in youth sports do well in life. I've had former players from my teams that didn't do so well in life. Just like other people, they've made some bad choices, but not many. So, the rewards for chil- dren that participate in youth sports continue throughout their lives. I WOULD ALSO like to point out that sometimes sports. They know how children have bad experi- importoJnt it is to do their job .ences w.hile.parffcipating h 'on the field and how impor- youtl sports, but those inci tant it is to help their team dents are usually rare. Sometimes, you will find a mates. One of the most impor- tant thing that youth sports teaches children is discipline. A child has to be disciplined to play their position, no mat- ter what it is. It also takes a lot of self discipline to get called out on strikes, handle making an error or getting pulverized by a linebacker. Self discipline is one of the most important things in life. Sports also teach children the importance of working hard and working to improve. Children involved in sports quickly learn that in order to hold their own with other chil- dren on the playing field, they must improve their abilities. They also learn that compe- tition becomes tougher as you move up in levels of play and they must reach that level of competition. So, they are taught you must work to get better and you must work hard to improve your skills. coach that puts winning above everything, and when that happens you have a seri- ous problem. But, for the most part, I've found that youth coaches understand that youth sports are for training and development and try their best to put those things above winning. Let's face it, everybody wants to win. It's human nature to want to be the best, but a coach should never put win- ning above developing the skills of players and teaching them the things I've men- tioned above that they can use throughout their lifetime. THE LESSONS learned by children in youth sports are lessons they take with them into life. Usually, chil- dren that participate in youth sports do better in school, get along better with other chil- dren and do not usually get into as much trouble as those that do not participate. Of course, to say all children that mrticipate in youth sports erform better all around AS THE SEASON comes to a close for many teams, I would like to take a moment to say thank you all the par- ents for allowing your chil- dren to participate, to the coaches for taking your time to coach, to the players for being dedicated and to those that support the youth pro- grams for caring. It takes all of you working together to ' make a program successful, but more importantly, to help these youth develop into strong leaders of tomorrow for our community. I hope the season was a good one for each of you and I hope that each and every- one of you will be out there again next season. THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercuo Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway. Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 m Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical Ix)stage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. F(m SUB,:RII'TIONS call (706) 846-3 t88 or write to Circulation Manager, Sttu" Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director. .............................................................. Mike Hale Associate Publisher and FAitor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richtudson StaffWriters ................................................ Bryan Geter. Billy Bryan. Clint Claybrck Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Composing ....................................... Valinda hry. Dewayne Flowers. Rtff)ert Weems l:gals ...................................................................................................... Jaync Goldston Circulation Manager. .................................................... - ............................... Judy ('rcx s Production Manager. ........................................................................... Bobby Brazil Jr. Assistant Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Grochow,ki Pressroom ........................................... Damell McCau ey Joey Knight, Lany Colleges CORPORATE OEFICEIS President ............................................................................................. Milku'd B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Chm'lotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and ,retaty. ....................................... Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer ................................................... K; t 1} G" nes Gan'etl Legal Counl and Assistam Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes C inions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JUNE 26, 2003 Best Friend and Kathy Sue Written in 1978 This is a love story, or what's left of it. It began when I was in the third grade, and so was my boyhood friend and idol Weyman C. Wannamaker Jr., a great American. The summer break had passed, and it was the first day of the new school year. We were standing, Weyman and I, by the playground swing set where Weyman ran a thriving porno business. Weyman's older brother was in the Navy. He came home on leave and brought Weyman a deck of playing cards with pictures you did- n't see that often in those timid times. For a dime, you got a blind card draw out of Weyman's deck, and you didn't have to give the cara back until lunch period. Weyman sold out almost every morning, and by the time the cards and pic- tures were too worn for fur- ther rentals, he had a down payment on a movie projec- tor, which is another story. "THERE'S a new girl in our class," Arnold Bates walked up and told us. Arnold, who was one of Weyman's best customers, got all the inside information at school because his mother taught sixth grade. Arnold also wore thick glasses and got extra dessert in the lunch room. "Arnold ain't worth killing" is what Weyman thought of him. This time, however, Weyman was keenly inter- ested in what Arnold had to say. I knew that because when Arnold wouldn't tell him the new girl's name unless Weyman rented him his favorite card for free, Weyman belted him one. "Kathy Sue Loudermilk," said Arnold, picking himself up off the playground dirt. You didn't make deals with the third grade godfather. It was love at first sight. Weyman already had a stable of grade school lovelies that even included a fifth-grader, Margie Roundtree, who wore lipstick and was talked about in faculty meetings. "She's headed for nothing but trouble," is what Arnold Bates said his mother heard the principal say about her. Weyman simply wanted to be there when she arrived. But there was Kathy Sue Loudermilk. I had never seen Weyman act as he did over this new girl in class. He brought her candy. He walked her home from school every day. He tried to break Arnold Bates' arm for talking to her during morning recess. He even offered her one of his play- ing cards for half price. Weyman was delirious with love. AS THE YEARS PASSED, nothing changed. When Weyman was 16, he bought his first car, a 1953 Ford. He covered the backseat with a chenille bedspread, put shag carpet on the floorboard, and hung a pair of foam rubber dice from the rearview mir- ror. It was in this romantic set- ting that they spent evening after evening parked in the pecan grove behind the Lind Creek Fundamental Back-to- the-Bible Church. Nobody knows the real reason they never married. Weyman bought a went into the ness. Kathy Sue had filled out her the time she was out school. They sweater when she Weyman called the day. I could tell was wrong. "Hear about Kathy he asked. I hadn't. '!Ran off and Weyman said. "I'm sorry," is all I think to say. know?" "Arnold Bates," answered, chokinl tears. He was sacking of onions at the time. BY SPECIAL WITH HISWIDOW NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LATE GRIZZARD, BY MORELAND. MOST WIDELY READ HIS TIME. PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC WIDE. What Is a Real Family In This Day? Here it comes again. The family is under attack again. It seems the enemy is on the warpath again and his sights are on the home. Just in the last Week we have hard about the decision of Canada to allow same sex marriages. For those who will open the eyes of their understanding, it is plain to see this is an a.t0mpt or atan, to corrupt what littl morality and decency is left in this coun- try. While the American fam- ily clings to a fragile thread by those who still stand for the truth, the enemy of the home is using our neighbors to the north to "sanction" the abominable lifestyle they have chose. Again, this is nothing more than an attempt of the devil himself to cor- rupt that which God calls a family. May I submit to you today that the family, the home is made up of one man, one woman, for life, and any chil- dren that God blesses them with. One does not have tO read very far into the word of God to find this is God's plan, and a plan that is non- negotiable. The Bible states that God created the man called Adam and then he cre- ated the woman called Eve. Then God brought to Adam his wife Eve and command- ed them to be fruitful and multiply. WITHOUT trying to be sarcastic, as someone has already stated, if God intend- ed for man to be with man, he would have created Adam and Steve instead of Adam and Eve. It is quite impossi- ble for humans of the same sex to carry out the com- mands of God for populating this earth. If one continues to read through the word of God, they will be confronted with other scriptures that relate God's plan for marriage and his utter disdain for what our land has deemed an alternate lifestyle. Old Testament pas- sages such as Genesis 18-19 and Leviticus 18 and New Testament passages such as Romans 1 and 1 Timothy 1 convey in no uncertain terms the sinful nature of homosex- uality. Today let the record state that the introduction and sanction of such a tray- esty of the commands of scripture into our land will cause our 4and to crumble from the inside out. A care- ful study of the fallen world empires will show that the beginning of their demise was the decline and complete disregard of moral standards. May I also state that by speaking out against the sin of homosexuality, it no way makes me homophobic, a gay basher, a hate-monger, or any- thing else the politically cor- rect crowd wants to label it. Just because one the lifestyle is labeled an abomination, it doesn't mean that the indi- vidual is abominable in the eyes of God. We must under- stand that it is sin thht sepa- rates humans from God and not one in particular. No mat- ter the sin and no matter how man labels it, sin is sin and it was for the sins of me that Jesus died to God does not hate vidual and one of children m no bor hatred anyone. Yes, the the Gospel is one demns sin, but it that shares the love through the sacrifice son on the cross of God hates no '6ne, Bible says, For the word, that he begotten Son..." says that, "God his love toward us, while we were yet Christ dies for us." Don't confuse the Just because one against sin and error make them a fact the opposite is one fails to stand for thel and fails to warn of the Satan is one is showing a by the enemy himself. this world wake up that Satan " listen to the truth that died to save sinners Paul says, B 50 Yea00 Ag In the Hogansville "CELEBRATION: readiness for a big and glorious July celebration for the and surrounding areas one week Saturday..." The event was include a parade, a barbecue and ance by Lt. Gov. Marvin Griffin. *DANGEROUS TIMES: Thompson, age 60, some five miles of Greenville, was killed about one o'clock when the car he was ing was struck by a Central of Georgia near Allie." JUNE, 1953: Showing at The Theatre was 'Bride of the Gorilla' with Chaney, Martin and Lewis in and 'The Jazz Singer' with Danny and Peggy Lee.' *BARGAINS: The Miracle Bam men's undershirts at four for $1 and two for $1. Handkerchiefs 12 for $1.00, a far better price than the for $100' inadvertantly posted in a week's ad. *FOOD AND CONTR( Baldwin's Market continued to mix low I; ing with feisty banter, noting hey the old man but they can't stop advertised 10 ounces of popcorn for and Tripe for $.24.