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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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June 29, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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June 29, 2000
 

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THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 Millard B. Gdmes, President Mlr HALE PU BLISHF.R/ADVERTISIN G DIRECrOR JOHN KUYKFDALL A.socIAI: PUBUSHER/EDrrOR BRYAN GETER A&SOC[ATE EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS IVIANAGER Phone (700) 846-3188. Fax (706) 8462206 P. O. Box 426 t togansville, Georgia 30230 The Perfect Gift For Father's Day This past Father's Day I received one of the greatest pre- sents anyone could hope for. A worn-out, old pistol. To anyone else that old pistol would mean much, but to me it was the greatest gift I could have received. That old pistol holds a number of memories and a lot of sentimental value for me. Without going into a lot of detail, allow me to explain. MY FATHER passed away when I was young and still a stu- dent at Harris County High School. One of his possessions I always loved was his Cowboy Anniversary edition Smith and - Wesson 38 long- barrel pistol with , bone handles. As a boy, my father would let me take target practice ! with it occasionally. While out shooting at tin cans and pretending they were bad i guys, my father and I shared some of our best times together. We would Stand out there and shoot that pistol and talk for hours on end sometimes ..... He lovedthat piatol and that made it specfal for me. So, when he passed away, one of his belong- ings I wanted most was that pis- tol. I kept it for years, and with- out going into a lot of detail, the pistol disappeared one day. It broke my heart. For several years now, I've prayed that old pistol would be returned to my posses- sion. I had finally given up hope of ever recovering it. HOWEVER, this past Father's Day it was returned to me. It's a little worse for ware now. It has- n't been oiled in quite some time. The handles need bleaching and the pistol will most likely have to be recoated. To people it would look like a rusty old pistol worth nothing. To me, it looked like a million dollars. The looks really didn't mat- ter that much anyway. I'm just grateful to have it back in my pos- session where it belongs. I'm sure it will take me sev- eral hours of work just to get the pistol back into fair condition. That doesn't matter either. Because when I sit down to work on that pistol, I'll remember those days my dad and I spent togeth- er. Once the gun is reconditioned and back in tip-top shape, I will put it back in its rightful place, in my memory collection of my mother and father. OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVII200 HOME NEWS - JUNE 29, 2000 Enjoy Holiday, Remember Independence Day, or the Fourth of July as many folks call it, will be celebrated Tuesday. Even though we are a free nation, this freedom didn't come easy. We should thank the Lord everyday for what He has done for us and for the pilgrims who wanted to come to the New World at whatever cost to be free and be able to worship God. I'm thankful for the strong leadership of George Washington who got on his knees in the snow at Valley Forge and prayed for his small hungry army and America, the new land he now loved so much. It seemed the British were going to defeat us but God heard and answered Washington's plea and brought the victory. THE UNITED STATES observes no national holidays- those mandated by the federal government. The United states Congress and/or President can only establish an "official" holi- day for the District of Columbia and federal employees. Federal employees, didn't start getting a "day off" until the 20th century. A public holiday can only be issued at the local level. This can be accomplished through the enactment of a law issued by a state legislature or by an execu- tive proclamation by the state gov- ernor. It is also possible that a city may enact an ordinance regard- ing the celebration of the Fourth of July. THE FIRST "official" state celebration of the holiday as rec- ognized under resolve of a legis- lature occurred in Massachusetts in 1781. Boston was the first munici- pality to officially designate July Fourth as a holiday in 1783. Alexander Martin of North Carolina was the first governor to issue a state order for cele- brating Independence Day on the Fourth of July in 1783. The Declaration of Independence, unanimously declared by the thirteen United States of America, was adopted by the Continental Congress in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. THERE IS NOT MUCH dif- ference in the way we celebrate Independence Day today than they did back in 1776. Williamsburg celebrated the "It wouldn't be the Fourth with- out the grill get- ring.fired up..." holiday on July 25, 1776 with demonstration of joy as the Declaration of Independence was read. A military parade and the firing of the cannon and musketry were on tap. In Trenton, N.J., Independence Day was pro- claimed and received with loud acclamations by the militia and the citizens. In New York, the Declaration was read and louJauzzas and utmost demonstrations of joy was received. The "equestrian statue of George III" in New York, was torn down. The report lead from which the was made was to be bullets. Most of the elaborate tions in 1977 Philadelphia. Cannons charged, one for each union, the ringing ner, the use of music ing of toasts. A and the use of the helped dress up and gallies" in the WHEN I DIE, the pistol will be given to my son, Brarmon. I hope he will cherish it as much as I do. When he reaches a ripe old age, I hope he will then pass it along to another member of the family. The return of this pistol does prove something. It proves that God still answers prayer. He knows when a prayer needs answering. The pistol was returned to me at the perfect time. The week prior to Father's Day I thought about my dad a lot. You never know how much you will miss your mother or father until they are there anymore. While on Father's Day, my dad was not there for me to tell him I love him, the pistol was there to remind me of those times we spent together. I'm so thankful for the return of my father's pistol. It had to be one of the best Father's Day gifts ever. We welcome your ideas... If you would like to give us some suggestions about your week- ly newspaper, just drop us a line at: The ttogansville Home News EO. Box 426 - Hogansville, GA 3t)230 THE HOGANSVII,I HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, G-eorgia 31816. USPS 6204M0. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230. FoR StJBSCRIrTIONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchesler, Georgia 31816. Pg: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................. John Kuykendall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Business Manager ........................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ......................... Deborah Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Director of Photography ......................................................................... Michael C. Snider Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Composing ............................................ 7. ....... Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith, Lauren King Legals .................................................. : .............................................................. Valinda Ivery Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager ........................................................................................ Roland Foiles Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski CORPOP.KrE O'E President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura Crimes Cofer Treasure .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ....................................... : .......... James S. Grimes : TUESDAY, guzzle more beer and eat the year. A splash in the po01 relaxing or just resting i lazy-boy will be nice. Others will while many will poles to the lake. It out the grill getting the ribs melting Fresh peach ice tasty while down so the Whatever you do, b and enjoy the Fourth forefathers fought and  our freedom. NEWS WEEK MADE the whispering its lead article in its July 20 issue. The article was rebuttal and rebuke. It showed a healthy Roosevelt swimming on the first page, then 11 pho- tos of his face taken between June 1932 and July 1935. He appeared vibrant and fit. He had aged not at all. (In 1936 Anne O'Hare McCormack of the New York Times noted that of all the heads of state she knew, only Roosevelt had not noticeably aged during the years of the world depression.) Time magazine also report- ed that Washington correspon- dents "have been plagued by queries from editors and pub- lishers back home" concerning "tales roaring through the coun- try in whispers [that FDR] had grown mentally irresponsible." .'New York Times Washington correspondent Arthur Krock wrote a column about the rumors, concluding that the truth was Roosevelt was as mentally alert as ever, but that it was hot in Washington, some New Deal programs were being thwarted and Roosevelt was displaying "administrative and political weakness ..... But he is still the same old Roosevelt." Stanley High of NBC broadcast that his own investigation showed the President was in no way dis- abled. HOW HAD IT all started? Some attributed it to a lone advertising man, E.P. Cramer of Plainfield, New Jersey. On March 28, 1935, Cramer had written a letter to C.E. Groesbeck, chairman of the Electric Bond and Share Co., suggesting some ways the util- ity could protect itself against "political attack" and destroy "Fast in rsuit chased a contradic- tory yarn: the Pres- ident's infirmity had wholly left him; his lameness was just a fake to get the nation's sympathy." "the New Deal, which is the motivating force behind the attack." He suggested a six-point program, most of which was simple public relations and lob- bying. But point three was "A whispering campaign, designed to create popular suspicion that the New Dealers, and especial- ly the New Dealer-in-Chief, are either incompetent or insane." There is no evidence Groesbeck or any other execu- tive there put the campaign into motion. likely that a have gotten the ensued. But a Senate investigating Cramer before it that. read him some of the about the widespread ing campaign and he had any "secret satisfaction." No, he was ashamed of done. But, he told tors, as if to justify Democratic publicis spread stories that Hoover was insane. There was at tim of the whisper1: paign. Cramer was Edison Industries. (Next week: The Balls Begin) 'THE SQUIRE OF 'TH I AT' TIE WHITE TAINS REPRINTED IN PER DURING PROCEEDS FROM TI SALE ALL GO TO SEVELT CENTER. The Faithfulness of God Ins There are times when we all go through the difficult times of life. Those times may be times of sickness, death, family problems, financial reverses, or the every- day temptations of life. Someone has made the state- ment, "You are either in a storm, coming out of a storm, or headed to a storm." It is during these difficult days of life that one of the many tactics of Satan come to bear on our lives, and that is his weapon of accusation. The devil by name means an accuser. From a care- ful study of the Bible, one can find that Satan has four targets for his accusations. He will accuse man to God, man to man, man to him- self, and he will also accuse God to man. IT IS DURING the trials of life that one will find Satan accus- ing God to man. While in those difficult days, the enemy of souls will try to east a dark shadow on the grace and mercy of God Almighty. He will bring things to our minds, like, "If God really loved you, then why did he let your father die?" or he might say, "If God is so great, then why didn't he stop your child from having that wreck?" One of the goals of Satan is to hinder and even try to stop peo- ple from placing their faith in the living God of glory. (2 Corinthians 4:4) But, John eight tells us that Satan is a liar and the father of lies. Dear child of God, when the dark days of life come, rest assured that God is faithful. There has not been one promise of God that has "fell to the ground." HOWEVER, because we are still living in this robe of flesh, we often struggle in our faith in God's control of things. Many times we are like Job who said in Job chapter twenty-three and verse three, "Oh that I knew where I might find himl That I might come even to his seat." He also said in that same chapter beginning in verse eight, "Behold, I go forward, but he is not there; and backward, but I cannot per- ceive him: (9) On the left hand, where he doth work, but I cannot behold him: he hideth himself on the right hand, that I cannot see him: (10) But he lmoweth the way that I take: when he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold." Many "Job said that even though he could not see God working, he was still worl00g. " times in the trials we wonder where God is and if he has indeed left us. Look back to what Job said in verse nine, "On the left hand, where he cloth work,.but I cannot behold him." Job said that even though he could not see God working, he was still working. All through scripture, we can see where God worked behind the scenes for the benefit of his peo- ple. There may be when the people of see God work in their 1 we can have confidence ing that Hebrews The Bible said, I will never leave thee sake thee." Althoughwe maynot him at times, and for those who love are the called purpose, he is for our good and (Romans 8:28) AS WE THINK ject such as this, a by A.J. Sims entitled Hand comes to mind. verse and chorus "There" see, While gomg world of woe, me as I go. I'm unseen hand, That 1 this weary land, And day, I'll reach that guided by the May we that while in Heavenly Father his word and never his children. Hate-gossip about Roose- velt's health had always been present, but it stayed in the background until the summer of 1935. In June of that year, Republican Sen. Thomas D. Schall of Minnesota read his col- leagues a business tipster sheet that said Roosevelt's "inane replies" to questions and "men- tal vagaries" were "beginning to fulfill our predictions." The nation appearefli Be awash in such private publica- tions. News Week magazine characterized typical gossip: "The after-effect of infantile paralysis has driven the President insane! To relieve the pain of his infirmity, he had taken to drugs!!...The President was a hopeless, helpless invalid! ! !" Fast in pursuit chased a con- tradictory yarn: the President's infirmity had wholly left him; his lameness was just a fake to get the nation's sympathy. Foes Question FDR 's 'Inane' Rep