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Manchester, Georgia
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July 3, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 Jk (6rime }luhli[atitm Millard B. Grimes, President Mmr Iin PUBLISHFJADVERTISING DIRFLOR JOHN KALL ASSOCIATE PUBIJSttFAEDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASalSTANT EDrrOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS 1VI_ANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia )230 Memories Keep Loved Ones Close Last week I sat in a church filled with family and friends and listened as a preacher talked about death is not the end, but a beginning. That statement is true, because as a Christian one knows that eternity means being with Christ. So, in essence, death is not the end, but the begin- ning of a new life. All Christians believe that they will go to heaven, they will live eternally with Christ and they will meet their loved ones again on the other side. For a true Christian, death is not viewed upon as the end, but the beginning. A Christian does not fear death, but embraces it. However, even though family and friends can find comfort in knowing they will see the person again in eter- nity, the loss can be devastat- ing and painful. Dealing with the pain felt after losing a loved one is a difficult thing. Few things bring comfort and joy to us and dealing with the fact that the person we love so much has left us is ,hard to accept or deal with. Having lost both of my parents at a young age, I can speak from experience about having to deal with such pain. It would be wonderful ff you could say the pain will eventually go away, but it won't. It gets better with time, but it never leaves you. There are always little things that remind you of that lost loved one. Holidays are the tough- est, especially Mother's Day, Father's Day and Christmas. You remember that lost loved one and you wish you could spend a few moments with them. Actually, I've learned that you can. AMONG THE THINGS that that special person left behind are your memories of them. Those memories are one way to make the pain a little better and help you deal with life without them. Each of us have special memories of each and every loved one or friend we've ever lost. Those memories can make us smile, make us sad and make us realize that the person we loved so much is still a part of us, even if it's simply though our memories. For example, this past Christmas was a difficult one for me. All of my immediate family members were out of town and I was left alone. Trust me, spending Christmas alone is not much fun. As I sat there on Christmas Day watching reruns on television and try- ing to entertain myself, I began thinking about past hol- idays. One in particular came to mind. As I said earlier, I lost my Dad when I was 15 years old. His favorite holiday was Christmas. He loved surpris- ing everyone on Christmas. He would come up with the greatest presents. When I was 12-years-old I had a wish list a mile long. I wasn't sure what I want for Christmas. There was a five speed bike I had my eye on. i wanted to learn to play the drums. So on and so on. At that time, my Dad ran the Bay Station in Hamilton and I worked there on the weekends. We were driving home one Saturday night and he asked me to explain to him exactly why I wanted the items on my list. "You will most likely only get one of them," he said, "but, I'm trying to determine what you want the most and why." We went over the list of items one by one. At the end of the conversation, knowing I could only get one of the large items on my list, I announced I would take the five speed. On Christmas Day, we had a scavenger hunt at our house. My Dad announced that my presents had been scattered throughout the house and out- side. It was my job to find them. It took a while, but I found all the presents and to my sur- prise.., every item on my wish list was there. I COULDN'T HELP but smile. That memory brought me joy. It reminded me of two things, one my Dad loved me and secondly, it was his desire to make my Christmas spe- cial. That one single memory of that Christmas Day so long ago made my holiday so much better. Even though I was alone. For anyone that has lost a loved one recently, let me say, "That person is not gone. They are always near through your memories and will always be felt in your heart." THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR SUSSCRII'nONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications. P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTM&,ER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director. .............................................................. Mike Hale Asociate Publisherand EdiRw ............................................................ John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWriters ................................................ Bryan Geter, Billy Bryan, Clint Claybrook Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Comlxsing ....................................... Valinda Ivery, Dewayne Flowers. Rffert Wcems Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulation Manager ..................................................................................... Judy' Crews Prcntuction Manager. ........................................................................... Bobby Brazil Jr. Assistant Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Grx:howski Pressroom ........................................... Darnell McCauley, Joey Knight, Larry Colleges COaPORAT Omcr.as President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer ........................................................ Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANSVII2_ HOME NEWS - JULY 3, 2003 # The Story of Charlie and Written in 1979 I called the Atlanta fed- eral pen to inquire about Charlie Hines, Number 31579-120. Charlie, who is 64, robbed a bank down in Florida a couple of years ago. After his conviction, he was shipped off to the "Big A." "Yep," said a most unpleas- ant voice on the other end of the phone, "we still got him." And probably will have for some time to come. Charlie sent me some- thing in the mail once. It was a copy of an article by a Florida Times-Union reporter named Ken Cruickshank. The article explained how Charlie became a bank robber. I'll take the story from Cruickshank's article. He said he didn't mind. Charlie got married in 1968 to a lady named Julia. Cruickshank told me, "They were a very devoted couple." BUT HARD TIMES soon followed the marriage. Charlie had trouble with his feet. He was a diabetic. He had managed an amusement park in Tampa, but his health forced him to quit. He bought some proper- ty in Tampa and opened a tav- ern and a restaurant. But Charlie Hines was in and out of the hospital and was eventually declared dis- abled by the Social Security Administration. He and his wife were trying to live on $156 a month. In 1973 their problems worsened. Julia had to have an operation for cancer. Charlie tried to go back to work to pay for her medi- cine. He tried a paper route of 125 miles for 11 months. Because of his health, he lost money on the route and was forced to quit again. The bank took away the tavern and restaurant. Charlie turned 62. His dis- ability payments stopped. Social Security payments started. Now, Charlie and Julia Hines were trying to live on $137.10 a month. Julia was in terrible pain, the story continues. Her med- icine was expensive. Liquor was cheap. She began drink- ing heavily. "I would mix a drink to ease her," Charlie told Ken Cruickshank. "That's how it started." Charlie's condition hadn't improved either. He was hav- ing dizzy spells and periodic "Now, Charlie and Julia Hines were trying to live on $137.10 a month." blackouts. A doctor ordered a brain scan. "I couldn't do it, though," Charlie explained: "I didn't have that kind of money." It was May 1977 and Charlie Hines was desperate. He borrowed a .22 pistol and took five times his normal amount of painkillers - "so I could walk" - and went out to look for a bank to rob. He found  one in Inverness, Florida. Charlie doesn't know exactly how much money he took. He never got a chance to count it. He was cptured an hour later, 15 miles away. He tried to plead insanity, but the jury wouldn't listen. "I thou way," he said. %Ve no money and getting any. So I robbed that bank." Mazzone's Book Leaves You One of my Father's Day gifts from my wife, Helen, was a copy of "Tales from the Braves Mound" by Leo Mazzone and Scott Freeman. She knew I would want to read it for two reasons: I am a big Braves fan and Leo and I are both unabashed Notre Dame football fans. Unlike Hillary Clinton, Leo does not claim to have written his book. What the cover probably should say is that the book was written by Scott Freeman from inter- views he had done with Leo. Scott is a senior editor for "Atlanta Magazine." He is a native of Carrollton. He has authored biographies about the Allman Brothers Band and about Otis Redding. But this book is no biog- raphy of Leo. The real Braves fan learns very little about Leo that he wouldn't have already picked up from watching Braves game on "IV and listening to Braves announcers. FOR EXAMPLE, there is no explanation for Leo's love for Notre Dame. It is men- tioned that Leo attends Irish football games. He wears a Notre Dame T-shirt under his uniform jersey often. And he won't change a particular shirt if the Braves get on an extended winning streak. He admits to being superstitious, but he doesn't explain the rea- son for his love for the Irish. Did he graduate from Notre Dame? Is he what is known as a subway alumnus like myself- someone who didn't go to school there, but who just likes it for its tradition. Is Leo Catholic? Is he mar- ried? Does he have children? What are his hobbies? These are things you won't find out because this book is strictly about baseball, but even the years of the Braves fantastic run as the dominating team in the National League are not discussed in real depth. The serious fan comes away wanting to know much more. WHY IS Leo always rock- ing in the dugout? Don't expect a surprise answer. Truth is, Leo doesn't know. It is just something he has always done since he was young. It helps relax him. He does reveal that some oppos- ing players kid him about it and even mock him. Robbie Thompson, former Giants infielder, while in the on-deck circle, would imitate Leo by rocking back and forth. One thing Leo does clear up that nobody else on the Braves wants to explain is why Greg Maddux does not want Javy Lopez to be his catcher. Leo says that Greg likes to call his own pitches and that he does not trust Javy to block the plate. Greg's favorite catcher was Charlie O'Brien. There is revelation of a practice session in which Charlie told Greg not to tell him what pitch he was going to throw and Greg could not throw a pitch by him. Leo thinks Greg is the greatest pitcher he's ever coached. He does give a few glimpses into the subtle humor Greg has. For instance, there was the time Greg got onto Leo's case because Leo has not paid him a mound visit in a long time. In his next start, around the sixth inning, Greg stopped and stared into the dugout. Manager Bobby Cox asked what was wrong with the pitcher. Leo said nothing. Bobby said he thought Greg wanted Leo to go out to the mound. An irate Leo paid the visit. Greg told him thanks for coming. Fas probably thought some great strategy was being discussed. Leo loves his job. He can't The Sad Demise of Michael Most everywhere I have been the past few weeks, even at church, I have been asked my thoughts on the contro-. versy between University of Georgia President Michael Adams and UGA Athletic Director Vince Dooley. I have decided there will be no winner when this is all over. The University will suf- fer more than any individual. Actually I fully expect Coach Dooley on campus long after the departure of Michael Adams. I think it would be a mis- take for Coach Dooley to run for any public office as either a Democrat or Republican. By declaring allegiance to either party he would gain the wrath of the opposing party. AS FOR ME, I would sup- port him on either ticket because I believe Coach Dooley to be intelligent and capable of making good deci- sions, regardless of his polit- ical affiliation. I just believe the University of Georgia needs his services now even more than the state of Georgia. Recently, the University of Arkansas gave their Athletic Director Frank Broyles, who is 79, a five year extension. This alone does not qualify Coach Dooley for an extension, but certainly does probe that all old men aren't senile. President Adams has made no good case for not extending Coach Dooley's contract that I have seen. You would think a man of Adams' stature would have devised a much better battle plan before taking on one of the more popular personalities in the state and the recognized leader of the Bulldog Nation. FRANKLY, I believe Adams has played his hand very stupidly, and will never be effective as president to the masses of Georgia Alumni and supporters. An intelligent person does not continuously make stupid mistakes as Adams has repeatedly done. I can't say that I'm disap- pointed in Michael Adams as president because I never heard of him until he came to )!!i " '"lhe University will suffer more than any individ- uaL" Athens. He came across to me as an egotistical person who needed more on the job training before he left Pepperdine. PEOPLE who have disap- POinted me most are ones like former Governor Joe Frank Harris and other Georgia Alumni who have chosen to take sides against n't seen his wife interview with Cruickshank. She for visits. Julia Hines partied her husband where, that day, while inside robbing Her number is 01129-179, Lexington, KY. She months. What made me Charlie and Julia exciting news that Patty Hearst, who convicted of robbing had been freed from ding to her former guard. *tIt may be "the wedding California seen," said one news just a "simple mony." Whatever it. Let's all wish couple well. wait to get to the parR! day. He thinks best manager ever for. He likes bullpen coach a friend of mine used to teach wife. Leo thinks John pitchers he thinks Tommy more grit. He Kevin MiUwood's and demeanor. He Steve Avery is the pitcher the Braves Leo naturally things to say much better over the than it has been He cared deeply unraveling of closer Wohlers two Braves won Series in : a calmer side that the left when he took the | The book seems ing about several who have spent a with the Braves. The book is ply and it is an en read. I recommend Braves fans. I just had given us more at Leo the person just Leo the coach. Dooley and the Nation. Some Georgia know have not ported all of Coach moves as coach and director. Many of ics have 20-20 eventhis ing to go to Dooley as their leader. Most Georgia I talk to do not President Adams' responsibility to mal sions as those at hand. WE HAVE Michael Adams a we have known Coach i for forty years. We t Coach Dooley has excellent job and the right to set his oW! merit date. There is an you make your lie in it." surely bring about downfall. Maybe the Pepperdine will his talents for sound athletic