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July 8, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
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July 8, 1999
 

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OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JULY 8, 1999 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS Millard B. Grimes, President USPS 62O-O4O MIKE HALE PUBI ,ISt IER]AI)V ERTISING DIRFX'TOR JOHN KUYKDALL A,'kS( X'IA'IT. PUBI .ISl tERIEDITOR MARION (TED) SMrm MANAGING Ellt'FOR/'CI tNI(AL DIR}X'roR I_:ANN WnEaxr B u S 1NI--'"; ]_ANAGER Phone (7{)6) 846,-3188 Fax (706) 846-2206 1 O. Box 426 t logansville, Georgia 30230 OJgckd Legal Organ, ('i O' ol th q2ama ilh' Teenage Violence I read with interest an arti- cle in the Columbus Ledger- Enquirer Friday that remind- ed me how violent our society (especially in teens) is today. According to the article, a Dale City, VA. woman and her two children, ages 4 and 2, left home on their way to church on Sunday. Apparently two teen- age girls had parked their car and in some way blocked the road. From reading the article, I could only assume the woman complained about their block- ing the roadway and the two teens and the woman got into a fight. The article was not clear who started the fight or threw the first punch. However, the woman was thrown to the ground by the teenagers, ages 18 and 16, and they began pounding her head on the pavement. The woman was hospital: ized after the fight and died on Thursday, July 1. I could not imagine what was going through the minds of the two youngehildren as they saw their mother being brutally attacked in this man- ner. It must have beer a horri- fying experience for them. In that same issue, was a front page story about Columbus school violence. The article stated a 14-member- panel made up of parents and local residents has recom- mended that the schools begin using uniforms and longer class days as possible solutions to reducing violence in schools. It seems that every time I pick up a newspaper, there is some article in it related to teen violence. The fact is, teens are more violent today than ever before. All you have to do is read the newspaper or watch the evening news to know this. State Rep. Carolyn Hugley spoke at the meeting held in Columbus and according to the article, she told the approxi- mately 50 residents in atten- dance that communities ignore violence in teens and then begin discussing how to deal With it after someone has been seri- ously injured or killed. "Violence is everywhere now," Hugley said. "Children are reaching out, and if we don't hear them, they'll make us hear." The fact is, we will proba- bly never find out why teens are so violent today or pinpoint why the violence happens. However, I tend to agree with the Columbus parents and res- idents. John Kuykendall We will probably never be able to determine the cause of the violence and we certainly can not predict where it's going to happen. Schools use to be safe, but they are even danger- ous now. When I was attending high school, a medal detector would have been unheard of in a school. Today, they could be as necessary as textbooks and pencils. The Columbus group may be on the right track. If stu- dents were kept in school between the hours of 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., until parents were home, maybe some of the violence would not occur. Extra curricular activities has proven to be a pretty good way of halting crime and vio- lence. Most children involved in extra curricular activities have pretty good grades and usual- ly stay out of trouble. They are usually practicing between those hours. Year round school is anoth- er thought, when you consider how much time teens have dur- ing the summer to find things to get into. All of this probably sounds harsh to some degree. However, I for one would rather have my child dressed in uni- forms, have longer school days and attend year round school than to have him wearing a striped uniform issued by the correction department and spending 24 hours a day behind bars. I don't have the answers. I really wish I did. However, I do know that we must take some type of action to deter violence in teens. If we don't, the problem will not get better, it will only get worse While our schools appear not to have the problems of the big city schools, we could be playing Russian Roulette by not taking steps now to deter vio- lence. I agree with Sen. Hugley, we often wait until something dras- tic happens to try and correct the problem. Maybe a better approach is to address the problem before we have an incident. THE ltOGANSVIIJ HOME N I,'w$ is published weekly by the Star- Mercury Publishing Company. a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, ManchesteL Georgia 31816. USPS 620.-040. Subscriptton rates by mail: $15 in Meriwether, Talbot or Hams Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all s',des taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR Sl)IISCRIPTIONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications. P. O. Box 426. Manchester. Georgia 31816. POMASTER: Send address changes to E O. Box 426. Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor .............................................................. J,flm Kuykendall Managing Editor and Technical Director ..................................... Marion (Ted) Smith Business Manager ...................................................................................... LeeAnn Wilbert Associate Editors .......................... Billy BryantfFalbonon. Michael Snider/Harqs County Dan Stout/Hogansville. Caroline Yeager/Greenville Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ...................................................................................... Linda Lester Photography ................................................................................... Michael Snider Features .....................................................................  A. Pike Valmda Comlxsmg ................................................................................. Ivery. Dori Green Legals ............................................................................................................. Vahnda lvery Receptionist and Classifiexk ....................................................... Cleta Young Plv, ssroom ............................................................... David Boggs, Wayne Grochowski COR)RAI'E OI,'FI "ER , President .................................................................................................. Millard Grimes Vtce President .................................................................................... Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Cofer "I'wasur ............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. Grimes A Party Line on the Cellular Coconut Telegraph Back in the late 60s, early 70s, you could look at a car on the highway and tell if the driv- er was practicing up for "Woodstock." Nowadays folks who are driving thirty miles per hour in a 70 mile per hour zone are either inconsiderate or talk- ing on a cell phone, which in itself is inconsiderate. I see this every day driving to and from work, and most of the time these people don't even know I'm there. They prove it by Slowly meandering over into my lane or just plain pushing me out of the way. They never skip a beat on that phone though. I don't know if Georgia, like some of the other states with large cities, will ever ban using phones in moving vehicles, but it probably won't affect other use of cell phones. I've never quite understood why people need to call so much. I've never noticed that I need to use the phone that much, except at work and there is one on my desk. Come to think of it, I get up and leave, hoping I won't have to answer it. I find it easier to use e-mail, that way whoever you are talk- ing to can't yell back at you if they don't like what you are telling them. Oh, they can cap- italize words, but it's not the same as yelling. Besides, it leaves the phone open for someone else to call you that may not want to yell. But, usually, when I get into my car the last thing I want to think about is work. And if I need to talk to my wife there are plen- ty of places to stop and phone, without me running the guy in the next lane up an exit he has- n't anticipated taking. It's hard enough for me to listen to the radio and shift gears at the same time. Most Americans don't want to be bothered with commanding their Car by using a manual transmission or being actively involved in any way with the process of driving it. Our cars are appliances that get us from point A to point B while we concentrate on some- thing else. Come to think of it I don't even have cupholders, or maybe I just haven't found them yet. My attention is on one thing when I'm driving my car: driv- hag. I follow the same rules when I walk. You are probably famil- iar with the well-worn clich6, "You can't walk and chew gum at the same time." Well, that's me. So, it's puz- zling when I see some guy car- rying a baby in his back pac k and pushing a bicycle that cost as much as my first car, wear- ing a fufir.y little helmet that looks like it's too small for his head, and yep, talking on a cell phone. Who is he talking to, and what about? Usually, his wife is right behind him, dressed in her rubber pants and shirt and car- rying ,their other kid in the same mann/Jr, talking on her cell phone and pushing her bike. Are they talking to each other? In the grocery store I have to wait in the aisle for a woman Jim Dale Columnist to make a call. Probably forgot to ask her husband what he wanted her to pick up for him. I wonder, too, if he's just an aisle over and they just can't find each other except by phone. Believe me, if I ever get sepa- rated from my wife in the gro- cery store or Walmart I just go to the children's lost and found and wait. She eventually comes there to find me. So, I'm thinking maybe it's a good idea for me to get us some of those phones so we don't spend an extra half hour ti-ying to find each other, and causing all the frozen stuff in the grocery cart to thaw. Okay, you get my drift, I'm sure. I've seen cell phones used in a lot of places I'd just as soon not think about. I still don't understand why today people need to talk to each other so much and at such inop- portune times. I can't think of that many people I want to talk to, especially while I'm walking down the street, or on the beach. You heard me, on vacation. My wife and I were walking down the beach last week while we were vacationing on the coast, looking for the ever elu- sive sand dollar and Io behold there was some ging down the beach in his ni swim suit, blond hair ing behind him, with around Ray Bans, and a phone in his ear. The wind was blowing mph and my hearing aids roaring like a tornado, thought, "I'd be lost if I to make a call on this Then I thought, "Why I'm on vacation." Obviously, there are people who can't even take: vacation without their phone. Telephones are one the main reasons I take a tion. I don't want to going on at home and I want anyone at home to what's going on with me, cially those I work with. ! the rest and peace and and I also need to live in er century I guess. I don't it's cool to profile, and what most of these callers are doing, at least opinion. But my wife would say why I'm buying a old sports car, to profile. I go there, because I can't that argument. I guess each his obut the day she es me profiling with a cell is the day she can have me mitted to a Hills Mental Institution for lular phone abusers. I don't need to be a on the "Cellular Telegraph." Dreams of Upscale Resort Are Unfulfille What Franklin Roosevelt had actually bought in Warm Springs was a somewhat run- down summer hotel without steam heat, but with naturally warm mineral-water swimming pools, over 1,000 acres of wood- land on the side of a mountain, a handful of dilapidated white- washed cottages, a few cottages of better construction, and a dream of combining two unlike- ly functions - therapy for crip- pled individuals and relaxation for well-to-do vacationers. On April 27, 1926, just eight days after the deed transferring the property to Roosevelt's new organization was signed, the Associated Press reported that "Mr. Roosevelt said he expects to make the property an all-year resort. "He believes that the Springs can be made a national resort, and plans to that end are being made. It is believed that he will interest many prominent Easterners and that the Springs soon will rank with the most fre- quented resorts in the country." Easterners and Southerners were in Roosevelt's sight, and part of the operation would be not just a resort but a club. He explained that selected individ- uals from North and South could enjoy the benefits of Warm Springs by sharing privately built and owned cottages. In his words: "The cottage owners from the North would be glad to turn their cottages over to the members from the South in the summer, and Southerners would be glad to turn their cottages over to the Northern members in the win- ter, as the club membership qualifications would assure a personnel which would take care of all the properties and maintain them properly." It was Roosevelt, not the newspapers, who was putting the emphasis on the high-class social-resort half of the project. In a press release issued at this time, he spoke of development that would "first get the famous Warm Springs baths and swim- ming lools" back in operation. Second will be the erection, pos- sibly this fall, of a health resort which will accommodate patients suffering from infan- tile paralysis and kindred afflic- tions, which have been relieved by the waters there." To those brief matter-of-fact statements was added this: "Third, the building of a cottage colony around the magnificent country club as a community center which will be available to people who are willing to maintain their part of the colony on a scale in keeping with their resources and their positions in life." And on and on about plans for an eighteen-hole golf course, bridle paths, shooting pre- serves, a fishing lake, a 'mag- nificent' clubhouse. Roosevelt envisioned a first- class resort for first-class peo- ple, somewhat in the style of what he imagined the place to have ,,been in its early days before the Civil War, or as Jekyll Island had become. Years later, when that dream had proved empty, replaced by the greater dream of an internationally known treatment center for polio patients, Roosevelt liked to remind the patients there, many of them from middle- and lower-income backgrounds, that Warm Springs a century before had been "a famous place," where the likes 6f Henry Clay and John C. Calhoun had cavorted. Roosevelt kept emphasizing this aspect in 1926 - perhaps because of two friendships he was developing in Warm Springs with two wealthy indus- trialists, Henry Pope of Chicago and James T Whitehead of Detroit, each of whom had a daughter with polio. Or perhaps because he believed financial stability demanded a success- ful nontherapeutic side for the project. His explanation that fall to an Atlanta Georgian reporter led to another newspaper story. It read: "The new Meriwether Reserve (the official title given the corporation that ran both the polio and the nonpolio-relat- ed commercial activities) will rival Pinehurst in the North Carolina Mountains." The amenities would include, Roosevelt now said, two eight- een-hole golf courses. In fact, there would eventu- ally be only one nine-hele golf course, and Roosevelt probably knew or had begun to suspect even in the fall of 1926 that his Warm Springs would be a dif- ferent sort of spa than the Pinehursts of the world. That first season opened in May of 1926 amid contradicto- ry omens. Here is how an observer who was there described the hotel in May: "It looked like an old-time hostel- ry in any quiet mountain resort of the Eastern states. Porch chairs, a great dining room, with Negro paraded automobiles with licenses from far and near, trees of oak and pine, them a midget after a first look did you see fleet of wheelchairs, filled the most part with and the crutches, canes braces. But nothing seemed like a hospital or torium. It had the spirit of country club." There were about twice l many 'able-bodied' in 1926 as polios, and each complained to about the other. The ers were worried about ing infected from sharing a I with the polios, and the they got. Separate exercise been dug near the larger and a dining room was set the basement of the hotel the exclusive use of the but interaction was im to avoid. Roosevelt des ed the income from the difl gotol arate colonies. His golf course was designed to specification that ' who could play but not walk, who could neither but wanted to watdh others would be able to drive along t course from tee to hole That meant, among things, wide, strong over the few streams on course so that autos could across. The conflict betweeO resort not resolve. (Next week: The Springs Foundation is What Every Woman Should Have Lorin is on vacation this week, so she took this opportu- nity to share some "Internet wit" recently e-mailed from a friend. The author is one of her personal favorites, "anony- mous," and for that reason she added a few personal twists. Every woman should have: --An old lover you still think fondly of; and, several who remind you of how far you've come. --Enough money to "move out", even if everyone knows that's an idle threat. --Your own personal credit rating and non-joint bank account. --At least one outfit you know you look really good in. --A youth you're content to move beyond. --A juicy, juicy past. Peace with the knowledg that you will grow old. --A hammer, a set of screw- drivers, a cordless drill and something lacy and black. --At least one nice piece of furniture - never "previously owned." --A friend who always makes you laugh; and, one who Lodn Stun- Clad( Columnist lets you cry. --Your grandmother's favorite recipe(s); your moth- ers, too. --The knowledge that you will survive - no matter who tromps in and out of your life. ---Control of those part: your destiny that you sonably decide; and, a faith in God for the rest. Every woman should --How to fall in love out losing yourself. --How to say, "I'm honestly; "Thank you" ciously; and, firmly, bye". --How to quit a job, relationship and friend, all with your head high. ---When to try harder; when to walk away.