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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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July 8, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
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July 8, 2004
 

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Opinions Ideas i ' " .,,, THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS , USPS ~,, , JOHN KUYKENDAIL PUBLISt IER/EDrI'OR faLsE I.v.s /~:~ ,amVERTIS,NG Dll~_-n m ~7~ ~ clam CLA~R(~K T~~ A.KS(X21ATE Eortx )R ~v ROB RIC~N ASSISTANT EDrlXiR Pl,~ne (706) 846-3188 Fax (706) 846-22tb P. O. Box 426 Hogansville. Georgm 302.30 l e's Hard Sometimes; Sniffle and Go Forward Oh no. Termites! A few weeks ago, I read with interest an article about termites in one of the area's daily newspapers. As I was reading the news article I ff~ught, '~mk God I dou't have that problem." A few days later, while cleaning the house, I noticed what I thought to be a dirt dob- ber's nest on my wall. I walked over, gave it a flick off the wall, and noticed that there was a hole in the sheetroclc. With a little further inves- tigation, I realized that the backing of the sheet rock had been eaten away and the top layer of paper was the only thing between me and the insu- latiou in the wall. The first thing that raced throughmy mindwas that arti- cle I had read about termites. I immediately called my exterminator. I was told that not all exterminators treat for termites. Guess what? Mine didn't. He did offer me the names of a couple of companies in the area that could treat my home. The next day I visited one of the companies and set up umn know that I've spent a great deal of time working on my home the past few months. Ironically, the location the termites decided to attack was one of the rooms that a great deal of work had gone into. Now, it has to be done again. It would have been really easy for me to be upset by all of this, but I really didn't let it bother me that much. I've tried to be optimistic about the situation. Funny, a few years ago I would not have reacted that way. I'm not sure if I'm just mellowing a little now that I'm older; simply realize that things happen and you just have to deal with it and go on with your life; or if I'm final- ly maturing. Whatever the reason, I'm really proud of myself for not being upset. Well, not really upset. I mean PAGE 4-A HOGANSVIIa HOME N~:ws ' ':~ ' ' - - I tit t,. f,A~, Jt:l,Y 8, 2004 , , ,, .... ",g ra Reealll nddaddyBun's Ixmgd My granddadd3 Bun's famil5 would lhen gather, :~ ~ changed a lot after 1~ funeral lasted all day. It was and one by one they would l~n I Bun died She wasWt ~ held at his home church, stand over the casket and ~ 1 as spirited. Her meX~ Pleasant Grove Baptist in peer in at the departed The ~.-~ 1 ~ began to go. I could he~ Heard County, and three closestfamih, membersusu- talking to "Daddy' i~i~ preachers I had never seen ally broke d~wn when they ~ 1 ~ sleep, and sometimes, u1 before took turns at *he pul- looked at the body of their r~ ~ ~i Col I sat with her at night~ pit. It was just the kind of loved one, but friends ,sual- k~ ~ conversation would service my grandfather ly didn't cry They ,qmplv : i: and she would discuss0~ would havewanted, stared awtiiJe al~d thei~ rencesoflongagoasffIt Noneofthethreepreach- remarked, "Lord. Ixwd, he him all the way back to Daddy Bun. I nevertri4 ers had any prepared notes. I was positive, because nobody could have read that fast. They would start out slowly, but by the time each had reached the climax of his message, his coat would be off, his tie would be undone, his shirt would be wringing wet with perspira- tion, and he would be gasp- hag for breath every five or six sentences that would come rushing out of his mouth in powerful gusts. It was impossible to keep up with what the preachers were trying to say, but I was able to pick up a "Pah-raise his name!" here and a "Have you been washed in the huh- hid?" there, and so I at least knew the general subject matter. THERE WERE a couple of things I would have changed about my grandfa- ther's funeral, however. It was the custom then to bring a body back home after the undertaker had completed looks like he could just sit up and talk, don't he?" Actually, my grandfather didn't look like he could just sit up and tall< at all, al~d e\'en if he had, his first words like- ly would have'been an apol- ogy for the x~ay he was dressed. They put him in a banker's suit and put a white shirt and a tie on him, and they took off his glasses. And if I hadn't been with him practically every day of my life since I was seven, 1 might not have recognized him. They should have dressed him in one of his old shirts and in his work pants, and they shouldn't have put all that powdery gook on his face. And had it been left up to me, I would have put the Market Bulletin in the cas- ket with him, so that when he got to heaven, he could have looked in the classifieds at what they were getting for mules around the state, one of his favorite pastimes AFTER THE SERVICES Moreland to bury him in the family plot: Unfortunately, there had been no more room available in the Baptist cemetery near his house when Daddy Buu and Mama Willie decided it was time to plan for where they would go to rest. So they had reluc- tantly bought in the Methodist cemetery a mile or so away from their home. There was one other thing I would have changed. It was, indeed, fitting that they had a girl from the com- munity sing "What a Friend We Have in Jesus" when we got to his graveside, but I would have asked her to hum the last two verses. MAMA WILLIE refused to move out of their little house after Daddy Bun died. I didn't blame her very much, and I even agreed to spend the night with her in nay old bedroom She wasn't in the best of health, either, and the family was afraid to leave her alone nights. correct her, and I enjoyed sharing some of the things shared with him. I also! certain that at least week, when I came her house to spend then I brought a little c~ Brutton's with me. i "You always tel sweet boy," she would me. I sort of wished ~ ould send me for onei switch, just for old sake. ...to be continued week BY SPECIAL WITH ms ttaoow, DEDR~ t HOME NEWS l ED COLUMNS BY GRIZZARD, BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY REad) WRITER PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 3II18-1266 A*~ his work, and friends and in tteardCounty, webrought My grandmother WIDE. Ii. O , i ...... Ililll~t~ Good Memories and a ProJect Gonejsam This year is the 100th anniversary of Georgia 4-H Club, which was first organ- ized in Newton County in 1904. My membership in the 4-H Club brings back many memories. she had ever Mlown was hard work and "'how to save a dol- lal:" My brothers and I were taught a work ethic earl3 in life. If our mother had not interfered we would have the 4-H Club. i One of my most exei~ days was when I was ele~ Clarke County Preside#~ our 4-H Club. I had reaclt the zenith among our youth. an appointm~t date for tlmm it does bother me some. My two younger brothers to come out and inspect my,~,~ Anyway, thethingislthink and I grew up on a rather home. I've finally reached a point in ~.~rllR!l~.~lll, solne two After the inspe~ffib~ my lifethat I realize that worry bad news fell like a ton of bricks.. "Yep, it's termites!" I OFTI~ Imar it is expen- sive to treat a home for ter- mites. R was not until the next day, when I ~ my esti- mate, that I knew how much. The fact of the matter is, it doesn't matter what the cost is, you have to do it. That is if you want to stop the slow dem- olition of your home. The company is supposed to treat my home this week. However, I've also learned that treating the home is not e~ough. You must get rid of all wood to ground contact in the home. Now, my home was built in the early 1920s and some of the pillars under the home were made from wood. So those have to be removed and replaced with meal pillars. Of course, ther~s st~ the damage that has alr~,~] done, that has to be rei~ir~. So, Ive contacted a co~trae- tor to take care of that~ The bottom line is, what I had heard was right. Getting rid of termites is very expen- sive and of course, repairing the damage they've causedis as weR. Those termites are pesky little creatures, but that's not exactly what this column is slx~t. I GUESS THAT most of the people that read my c01- won't help things; getting angry doesn't fix the problem; and treating everything like a crisis only makes you miser- able. As a youngster, I loved Charlie Chaplin movies. Crazy I know, but true. As I was reflecting on the termite situation, how I react- ed and wondering why I react- ed as I did, I thought about a quote from a Chaplin movie I saw as a child. "Life is a tragedy when seen in close up, but a come- dy in long shot," Chaplin said. I now know what that say- ing really means. It simply says that when we are close to any situation it seems like a tragedy, when we're not close to it then it simply becomes a nuisance. It's kind of like when some- one tells you about something bad going on in their life. We all feel for that person, but it really doesn't affect us so we don~ dwell on it or worry about it. So, here's a good thought about life in general from William Sydney Porter: "Life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with sniffles pre- dominating." So, when something goes wrong in your life, just take Porter's advice. Don't let it get you down completely. Just sniffle a little about it, get over it and move forward with your life. miles north of Athens. Soon after our father died in the summer of '35 our maternal grandparents came down from Jackson County to live with us. Our grandfather had been a su~sful farmer that rose from the ashes of recon- struction following the Civil War and had been a local leader in his community in social affairs, the church and school. Several times I have said that our grandfather was one of the more educated persons I have ever known to have very little formal education. Our grandmother was a Bulloch who migrated to Jackson County with other siblings after their parents died from a flu epidemic. All TIlE ltiOC~l~'~ll.l~ ~ NI~W~ is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Co~I~ly, a di'dsion of Glimcs Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-(140. Sub.~ription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Mmiwether Counties: $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical pos?tage paid at Hogansville Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FOR sl.q~ltwrlo~ call (706) 846-3i88 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 4215, M~,chesler, Georgia 31816. ~: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. ST~ Publisher and Editor ......... ~.; ............ .... ........ : ...................................... John Kukyendall Advertising Director .................................................................................. Laurie Le~vis A~ociate Editor ................................................................................... Clin[ Claylm~ok A~,fis~t Editor ............................................................................. , ....... Rob Richardsam SlaffWrite~ ......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Boant , Composition .............................. Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems, 'Gari Youngblo~l Ci~ulation Manager .......................................................................... Tmcy Lynn W) at! Press Manager ................................................................................. ~ayne Gmch~wcski Pressroom Assistants ..................................... Zaddie Dixon,DarneH McCauley Mallroom Distribution .............................................................................. David Boggs ~a~ Om~ms PresidenLi .......... ~ ................................ . ................... i .......................... Millard B, Grimes Vice President. ................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive'~c~ Pr~ident and Secretary ........................................ La~a Crimes ColOr "Tre~tu~r ......... :,; ........ :. ................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garret Legal Counsel and A_ssistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Grimes never been able to play ball. School was "tmpo~tant to both grandparents, but work ethic was most emphasized. Wheu we came home from school there was ahvays something to do besides play- ing ball. If it wasn't taking our one horse wagon to the field to gather rocks it was going to the garden to pick bugs off the potato vines. There was never a dull moment. AT THE RURAL two room county school we attended the 4-H Club was absolutely the biggest social event around. Don L. Branyon was the Clarke County agent at that time, and he would visit each county school at an appoint- ed time where the boys and girls, from ages 9-19, could become 4-H Club members. We had separate clubs, a home demonstt'ation agent for the girls and our county agent handled the boys. Looking back at these times, our grandfather was right. None of us would ever make a farmer as long as our mother let us play ball. We still had our regular chores to do, such as bring- ing in stove wood, coal, water, trash to build morning fires, milking our family cow, and cleaning the yards around our home. Soon after I was old enough to join the 4-H Club I helped organize a ball team x~fithin our club. We called our team the Green Devils from the green and white colors of .50 Years Ago... It was during this perJ of time ~ mother.let i buad anewc c! oi s ! my chicken project in club. ~* This all ended one] night when I was late getfl home from football praet~ I was scurrying around tol my chores done and sett temperature too high o.n~ brooder. All of my SO chicEs died. 1 This ended all plans me to be a farmer, hut ! days in 4-H will remain ar~.., the happiest days of my ~, Howwell I rememberu 4-H Clover emblem and tl 4-H pledge: "I pledge.., my head clearer thinking, my head greater loyalty, my han~ larger service, and my he~ to better living.., for my eli my community, my eou# and my world." In the Hogansville Herald Predecess~ tothe Hogansville Home News GOING FIRST CLASS - The biggest headline on front page of the July 8, 1954 Hogansville Herald announce0 the installation of a 'Cinamoscope' screen at the Royal Theatre. The manager told the paper that "This improve" ment, which will cost several lf~usand dollars, will put the Royal Theatre in the highest class of movie houses in the state." According to the story, "Cinemosco~ ~ 1t'~ audi- ence a sense of participation while achieving the illusion of depth." oSHATrERING DEVELOPMENTS -The two larga plate glass windows of Hogansville's Belk-Gallant store had been destroyed when a car crashed into the buUding and were replaced on Thursday morning. But Thursday night "a young visitor from North Carolina stumbled and fell agaiost the largest panes of glass," knocking them out again. _ MODERN MARVELS -'Deep freezers now ~ vogue in Hogansville' headlined a story about steady sales of tt~ appliances here. The article noted, "Whitley Barrett, the genial proprietor of the Westem Auto Associates Store of this city, reports a mn on the store this past week for deep freezers." *WANT AD WONDERS - "Wanted: 10 customers for good used washing machines at give-away prices." -BARGAINS OF THE 50s - The Hogansville Colonial Store advertised five pounds of potatoes for 23 cents, three pounds of yellow onions for 20 cents, lettuce for 10 centS a head, cantaloupes for 23 cents each, toilet tissue for 9 cents per roll and pork and beans at 10 cents for a 16- ounce can. CINEMA TIME - Offerings at the Royal Theatre includ- ed "Alaska Seas," "Thunderhead, Son of Ricka," "Tough asTheyCome, Saadia, and"Phantomoftt,~RueMorgue.