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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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July 10, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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July 10, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JULY 10, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A Gre 1klao. Mi B. Grkmml, PrmMckmt MIKE HALE PUBLISHERJADVERTI SING DIRFL"IR JOHN KUVKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISITOR RoB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER I Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Perspective of The Newsman If you talk with anyone who has made a career of newspapers, they can tell you there are many challenges to the job. To say it takes a spe- cial person to work in news would be an understatement. Newspaper reporters do not have normal work hours. A newsperson works when the news is going on. For instance, you may start your day at 8:30 a.m., but you have a commission meeting that begins at 7 p.m. So, you work the full day, then attend the meeting. It ends at 10 p.m., but you still have to write the story. So, you could end up working a 12 to 16-hour day. Honestly, newspaper peo- ple get used to the long hours though and it doesn't bother them like it would most peo- ple. Unfortunately, the fami- ly never gets used to it. I can't tell you how many family functions I've missed over the years, like birthday par- ties or even high school or Little League baseball games. Holidays are few and far between for news .people. The help her, and I'm honestly try- ing. One of our reporters has been assigned to the story and is working diligently on it. Unfortunately, it's going to take him time and while that is no consolation, at least we are trying. As I said, this can be one of the most frustrating parts of a newspaper person's job. The sad part about this particular case is, in my opin- ion, is not only did the inves- tigator not handle the case as it should have been, and the attorney not utilize docu- mentation at his disposal that could have maybe changed the outcome, but the judge made some mistakes in the courtroom, as well. Unfortunately; even with newspaper has to,make the all this the bottomla  is, the iday. a jury. Now, the jhrf cauonly I could go on and on about all those things, but often we forget as news people why we continue to do this type of work. It is simply because we love and enjoy it. We want to make a difference in the com- munity. Even though it is impossible to cover every event, to make everyone happy, and even print the per- fect newspaper, we want to give the community a news- paper it can be proud of. THE HARDEST thing about being a newspaper per- son is seeing things in the community that need chang- ing, injustice happening or a simple case of abuse and not being able to do something either immediately or at all. Over the years, I've seen so many things that I knew were wrong, needed chang- ing or were just not right and was unable to do anything about it. Not because I didn want to. Not because the newspaper didn't want to. But, because there was sim- ply nothing that could be done about it. Recently I was contacted by an individual who asked me to take a look at a court case. She provided documen- tation that would jump out at any attorney, let alone a crim- inal lawyer. There were flaws, there were mistakes in the handling of the inves- tigation; the list could go on and on. She was asking me to make a decision based on the facts presented to them. Having served on a jury, I know this to be true. So, in effect, the entire process broke down and it's possible that an innocent man was convicted wrongly and has spent several years behind bars. Of course, that remains to be seen. I in no way want to make an accusa- tion until I have all the facts. This is just one example of the things I'm talking about. Sometimes, it's easy to become aggravated, side- tracked and even confused in the news business. THE POINT I'm trying to make is simply this. While news people want to cover everything they possibly can, help the community as much as they can, and stay informed about everything that is going on in the com- munity, it can be a hard, chal- lenging and aggravating job. From this newsperson's point of view, the reason newspapers exist is to keep the community informed, serve the community and aboveall, help in any way pos- sible to correct injustice. It's not easy, sometimes thank- less, but is a satisfying career. The bottom line is, I am very passionate about my job and would never do anything else. THE HIR;ANSVIi.I.E HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company. a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roovelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subription rates by mail: $18 in Troup. Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Peri(xlical postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230. FOR SUaSCRWTR)NS call  706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications. P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. PtTMASTER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville, GA 30230 STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Asiate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Rich'son StaffWrie ................................................ Bryan Geter. Billy Bryan, Clint Chybmok Assistant Advertising Manager .................................................................. Laurie Lewis Composing ....................................... Valinda Ivery. Dewa) ne Fk)wers. Robert Weems Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Gold,on Circulation Manager. .................................................................................... Judy Crews Production Manager. ........................................................................... Bobby Brazil Jr. Assistant Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pressroom ........................................... Damell McCauley. Joey Knight, Larry Colleges COnFOgrE OFFtCEnS President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charkte S. Grimes Executive Vice President r, md Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Cmns1 'and Assistam Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Homemade Biscuits Save Marria Wr/tten in 1979 Jerry Clower, the funni- est man alive, does a routine on one of his records about biscuits. Jerry says the absence of homemade bis- cuits at the American break- fast table is one reason the divorce rate is going up. "Saddest sound in this world," Jerry once told me, "is the sound of them little canned biscuits being popped open early evah mawning' in evah house in the neighbor- hood." Jerry goes, '%Vhop ! Whopl Whop!" as an illustration. It's enough to make a grown man Cry. I agree with Jerry Clower. Give a man a homemade bis- cuits in the morning, and he'll come home to you at night. The Pillsbury Doughboy, with his dratted canned biscuits, is a lousy home wrecker. There was a time, espe- cially in the South, when the woman arose early enough in the morning to prepare home- made biscuits for her hus- band and family. It was a sim- pler time. Before mixed dou- bles replaced sex. Women in those days served plates of piping hot biscuits. Big, fluffy biscuits. Cut one open, slap a portion of butter between the halves and then cover that with your choice of jam or jelly. "A breakfast without bis- cuits," went a famous saying, "is like a day without sun- shine." But what, if anything, endures? The last homemade biscuit I saw was in a muse- um behind a glass case. It is time, women of America, to come to your senses. Halt the alarming increase in the divorce rate! Bring the homemade biscuit back to your breakfast table! We can all work together! You make 'em, we'tl eat 'em. What could be more fair? I MUST INSIST on tak- ing a hard line on this matter. An woman within the range of this column who subse- quently serves her family canned biscuits for breakfast in anything but an extreme emergency is a brazen hussy who smokes filterless ciga- rettes, drinks beer from a can and doesn't shave her legs. I called the editor of a famous cookbook, A Taste of Georgia, for help. She lives in Newnan and later this month, she is taking her book to the White House to pres- ent a copy to Rosalyn Carter. A Taste of Georgia is in homes all over the country, including Alaska, where the Eskimos are now eating grits with their whale blubber. The book contains thousands of Deep South recipes, includ- ing some for biscuits. The editor of A Taste of Georgia is Mrs. White. Mrs. John N. White. Martha White. I swear. "It's not that hard to make biscuits in the morning," said Martha White. "It's just that it takes a lot of time. Most women these days simply don't want to spend that much time in the kitchen in the morning when there are so many other options open to them." Like watching "Donahue"? Like playing in the Wednesday morning running for political Like marching on plant? I LOOKED in A Georgia for a biscuit r One is for "Angel You need flour, soda, salt baking sugar, shortening, butter milk. Cook for ! utes. Sounds divine. And one more ingredient most The last woman to cuits for me in the was a lady I years. I can ing her, '%Vhat biscuits so good?" '%ove son," she "I put in lots of love." Homemade breakfast, ladies? once? And soon? He'll taste the promise. BY SPECIAL NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LATIg GmzZ/mD, WHO GREW tiP BY MORELAND, MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS P.O. BOX GA 31118-1266 WIDE. Remember: Golden Rule Is Still Go back to the days of your childhood and try to remember those early Sunday school days. Go back to those days of summer vaca- tion bible school. Remember the Bible stories, the games, the crafts, the grape popsi- cles, and the skits. I can remember some of those , days. I guess my generation can ythat,thOse were the good old days. In thinking about those days, I can remember in Bible school and in Sunday school being taught the golden rule. We as children were taught to do unto others as we would have them do unto us. The golden rule is found specifically in Matthew 7:12 which says, " Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets." Although times have changed, society has changed, people have changed, and practices have changed, the principles of the word of God have not changed. Truly the golden rule is still golden. I wonder ff today's gener- ation had that rule instilled in them as previous genera- tions, if we would see the vio- lence we see today in our land? We hear the horror sto- ries of school shootings, we hear of the accounts of bul- lies in our schools, and many times we wonder what has happened to our young peo- ple. But my question is : Where are the parents? Where are the parents who were raised their children in church? WHERE ARE the parents that stood behind the teacher when the teacher used disci- plined the student at school? Where are the parents that taught their children the gold- en rule. I admit that despite the best efforts of some of the parents. There are some young people who still get into major trouble. However, compare the problems of today with the problems of yesterday, and we can see the vast difference. Why? I feel like the reason we have such clicks in school., such acts of bullying, and such incidents of revenge is because we have forsaken the biblical principle that men have referred to as the gold- en rule. May we be also reminded that a lot our young people have not only forsak- en the golden rule, but we as adults have done the same. We have been so engrossed in a self-preserving society that we have forgotten about the other guy. On our roads common couresty is almost a thing of the past. There are those who still will let a driver in the line of traffic, there are those who will stop at a light and leave the entrance to a business or side street open, and there are those who will still use their turn signal, but we also read and hear of road rage and general discourtesies. In stories acts of kindness are fading, in grocery stores, and even in some churches there are those who only care for self. Although the New Testament may be approach- ing 2000 years old, the gold- en rule is still golden. IF A PERSON carefully consider Matthew says in his he would find there aspects to the There is a positive there is a negative negative side says that not to do things unto that we do not want us. There is a positive J the rule. We are to what we would us. We are not harm others, and show acts of The Bible says in 18:24 "A man that friends must shew friendly." The will reap what we Someone has said it "What goes around around." King in Ecclesiastes, bread upon the thou shalt find it after J days. Today, why not concerted effort to be unkind extra special someone an even ff they are unldndt just because the golden. 50 Years In the Hogansville Pmdecamatothe *BUSY WEEK - There was hard news in Hogansville in 1953. page stories included "Lightning Down Chimney,' '24 Men Leave Induction,' 'Four Injured in Collision' and 'Col. Willie Johnson While Fishing.' Also on th ture of )ageant contestants in a labeled 'Truckload of Beauty' and piece about Mr. and Mrs. Whitley returning from a honeymoon trip included stops in Cuba, among places. CINEMA- Playing at the were such epics Condor'with Cornel Wilde, 'The Kid Amarillo' with Smiley and Barbara Stanwyck in 'All I Desire. Royal was also taking part in a in which two Donald Duck l boxes of silverware would be IN STORE Hogansville's Gallant was offering girls $2.95 value, at half price; for $3.97 and men's sport shirts for $1.59' or two for $3, saving 18 , Redmon Furniture was trying to ticket items by offering a free to purchasers of the $239.95 Agitator Automatic Washer. WANT AD STANDOUTS: A bedroom apartment, for rent at week.