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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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July 15, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
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July 15, 1999
 

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PAGE 2 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JULY 15, 1999 Deaths and Funerals Rap nine grandchildren and eight Hal er , 91, on Medical great-grandchildren; several nieces and nephews. Staff at Warm Springs DonationsinmemoryofMr. Brooks may be made to Singing at Grace Church Portions of this obituary were taken from the Atlanta Journal/Constitution As the director of internal medicine at the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, Hal Raper went to great lengths to do his part in the realization of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's dream. "He was one of the most compassionate human beings I've ever had the pleasure of knowing," said Frank C. Ruzycki, exec- utive director of the foundation, now known as the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation. "He epitomized the spirit and enthusiasm that President Roosevelt set forth at Warm Springs." Hal Stuart Raper St., 91, of Atlanta died from a heart attack at Lenbrook Square nursing facility on July 2. Dr. Raper was born in Austinville, Virginia March 17, 1908 and was given the name "Pat" in honor of his birth on St. Patrick's Day. He was the son of the late Hal Crockett Raper and Julia Sayers Raper. The Warm Springs Foundation was founded by President Roosevelt to empower individuals with disabilities to achieve personal independence. The institute is well known for its treatment of polio and reha- bilitation. Out of about six physicians at the foundation, Dr. Raper and the president were on a first name basis, though the president was not his patient, said his son, Hal S. Raper Jr. Of Atlanta. Dr Raper, who was involved in the daily care of the polio patients and documented their progress, was referred to as "Dr. Pat." A graduate of the University of Mississippi, Dr. Raper stud- ied medicine at Emory University. He interned at Piedmont Hospital until 1933, when he became a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army Medical Corps. He was sent to Tennessee with the Civilian Conservation Corps, a New Deal reforestation program that helped protect and improve state parks while PrOviding jobs for people during the Depression. Excited about Warm Springs' research on polio, Dr. Raper left theArmy in 1937 to work at the foundation, said his son. He retired in 1973 and stayed in Warm Springs until 1986, when he moved to Atlanta to be closer to his grandchildren. A colleague of Dr. Jonas Salk's, the polio vaccine developer who saved millions of people from the disease, Dr. Raper assist- ed him in his polio research. Dr. Raper was more than just a remarkable doctor, said Betty Brown of Pine Mountain, a former physical therapist at Warm Springs. "He was a charming Southern gentleman besides being a terrific doctor," she said. "He was a loving doctor to all the polio patients he took care of." He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Janice Howe Raper of Gadsden,.Alabama; a son, Hal Stuart Raper, Jr., D.D.S. and his wife Cathy Childress Raper of Atlanta; a grandson, Stuart W. Raper; a granddaughter, C. Pepper Raper, also of Atlanta; a broth- er, Colonel John Raper of Satellite Beach, Florida; sisters, Mrs. Lucy Marshall and Miss Margaret Raper of Columbus, Mississippi; nieces, nephews, grand and great nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions be made to the Roosevelt Warm Springs Development Fund Inc., P.O. Box 1000, Warm Springs, Georgia 31830-0268. Smith-Steele-Meadows Funeral Home of Woodbury was in charge of arrangements. Raymond H. Wardell St. Marks Community - Mr. Raymond H. Wardell, 91, of the St. Marks Community of Meriwether county, died Saturday, July 3, 1999, at his home. The funeral service was held in Westland, Michigan, with interment in Cadillac Memorial Gardens in Westland. Mr. Wardell was born February 4, 1908, in Detroit, Michigan, son of the late Fred and Minnie Scheller Wardell. he lived in Wayne, Michigan most of his life before making his home with his daughter in St. Marks in 1998. He was a member of Prayer Baptist Church in Westland and retired as superintendent of public works for the City of Wayne after 44 years of serv- ice. Survivors include two daughters, Mrs. Shirley Duncan of St. Marks and Mrs. Marian Strandberg of Anderson, South Carolina; two sons, Raymond H. Wardell, Jr. of Palm Harbor, Florida and Kenneth Wardell of Garden City, Michigan; one sister, Mrs. Lois Bancroft of California; and a number of grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great- great-grandchildren, including those living locally, Bryan Nelson, Eric Nelson, Sharon Bailey, Jim and Nancy Sloman, and Greg Nelson. The Claude A. McKibben and Sons Funeral Home of Hogansville was in charge of local arrangements. Mrs. Barbara H. Lloyd Hamilton - Mrs. Barbara H. Lloyd, 39, died July 4 at Doctors Hospital. Funeral services were held July 7 at Hamilton United Methodist Church with Rex,. Chris Mitchell, pastor of Solid Rock Assembly of God, officiating. Burial was in Hamilton Cemetery. Mrs. Lloyd was born February 13, 1960 in Columbus, daughter of Homer and Lucy Hancock. She had lived in Hamilton 11 years and attended Solid Rock Assembly of God Church in Columbus. Survivors, other than her parents, include her husband, David Lloyd of Hamilton; two daughters, Rachael and Abbie Lloyd and one son, Ben Lloyd, all of Hamilton; maternal grandmother, Dorothy Hall of Pierson, Florida; one brother, Dr. Gary Hancock of Hamilton; close cousins, Allison Dinsmor and Angle Tompkins, both of Atlanta, and Linda Redding of Florida; nieces, Chloe and Beatrice Hancock of Hamilton, and Deanna Nichole Sayler of Fortson. Cox Funeral Home of Hamilton was in charge of arrangements. Charles Franklin Brooks, Sr. Pine Mountain Valley Charles Franklin Brooks, Sr., 94, died July 3 at his residence. Funeral serCices were held July 6 at Roosevelt Memorial Church in Pine Mountain Valley with the Rev. Ken Grubb offi- ciating. Serving as active pall- bearers were Charles Brooks, Greg Brooks, Charles Ragsdale, Tommy Pierce, B.J. Baxley, and Merle Pearson. Honorary pallbearers were Dean Ebbett, Owen Riley, Russell Mosley, Walt Longford, Howard Gandy, Leonard Longford, Bud Harmon, Mike Darbe, Bill Langer, and Johnnie Mundy. Entombment was in the church cemetery mausoleum, according to Cox Funeral Home, Hamilton. Mr. Brooks was born April 20, 1905 in Cobb County, the son of the late William Felton Brooks and LulaWigley Brooks. He retired as a Bankers Health and Life Insurance agent and also worked for Callaway Gardens for 25 years as a tour bus driver. He had been a faithful and u dicated member of Roosevelt Memorial Church since 1942 and served all offices of the church during that time. He was a pioneer member of Callaway Gardens where he enjoyed fel- lowship with all the retired employees and friends during the year. Survivors include his wife of 64 years, Pauline Stephens Brooks of Pine Mountain Valley; one son, Charles F. Brooks, Jr. of Marietta; one daughter and son-in-law, Mary Alice and John W. Henson, Jr. of Pine Mountain Valley; one sister, Ozelle Evans of Vidalia; Roosevelt Memorial Church or the donor's favorite charity. Shirley A. Jenkins Hogansville - Mrs. Shirley A. Jenkins, 53, died July 5 at her home. The funeral service was conducted July 7 in the Chapel of the Claude A. McKibben and Sons Funeral Home in Hogansville. Pastor. Rick Probst officiated and interment was in Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Hogansville. Mrs. Jenkins was born March 2, 1946 in Atlanta and had lived in Troup and Coweta Counties for the past 20 years. She was a member of the Baptist faith and was employed as a truck driver at Ft. Gillem. Survivors include one daughter, Mrs. Lisa Hammett of LaGrange; two sons, Kenneth Blackmon and Terry Blackmon, both of Hogansville; her moth- er, Mrs. Edna Parlier of GrantviIle; two sisters, Miss Linda Bruce of Grantville and Mrs. Charmaine Stamps of Newnan; three brothers, William E. Bruce, Steve A. Parlier, and Thomas Parlier, Jr., all of Grantville; and five grand- children. The Claude A. McKibben and Sons Funeral Home of Hogansville was in charge of arrangements. Alvin LeRoy Davis, St. Thomaston - Alvin LeRoy Davis, Sr., 61, died Friday, July 9 at Upson Regional Medical Center in Thomaston. Funeral services were held July 11 at Cove Baptist Church with Rev. C.L. "Red" Roberson officiat- ing. Burial was in the church cemetery. Mr. Davi  was born October 27, 1937, son of the late James Herschel Davis and the late Eutha Belle Davis. He was a truck driver for Fepco Container, Inc. in Conley, was'a vetan-f. Air Force, was a member of Cove Baptist Church, a Mason, and a Shriner. Survivors include his wife, Suzanne "Sue" Jones Davis of Thomaston; two sons, Alvin L. Davis, Jr. of San Diego, California and Alan Davis of Marquette, Michigan; one" step- daughter, Mindi Thompson of Thomaston; one son, Nathan Scruggs, also of Thomaston; one brother, Alfred Davis of Conyers; one sister, Sandra Stone of Porterdale; five grand- children. Smith-Steele-Meadows Funeral Home of Woodbury was in charge of arrangements. Raymond H. Warflell st. Marks -Raymond H. Wardell, 91, died Saturday, July 3 at his home. The funeral serv- ice was held in Westland, Michigan, with interment in Cadillac Memorial Gardens in Westland. Mr. Wardell was born February 4, 1908 in Detroit, Michigan, son of the late Fred and Minnie Scheller Wardell. He lived in Wayne, Michigan most of his life before making his home with his daughter in St. Marks in 1998. He was a member of Prayer Baptist Church in Westland and retired as superintendent of 'public works for the City of Wayne after 44 years of serv- ice. Survivors include two daughters, Mrs. Shirley Duncan of St. Marks and Mrs. Marian . Strandberg of Anderson, South Carolina; two sons, Raymond H. Wardell, Jr. of Palm Harbor, Florida and Kenneth Wardell of Garden City, Michigan; one sister, Mrs. Lois Bancroft of California; and a number of grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great- great-grandchildren, including those living locally, Bryan Nelson, Eric Nelson, Sharon Bailey, Jim and Nancy Sloman, and Greg Nelson. The Claude A. McKibben and Sons Funeral Home of Hogansville was in charge of local arrangements. William "Jack" Howell Brown Savannah - William "Jack" Howell Brown, 91, died July 4 at St. Joseph Hospital in Savannah. Graveside services were held July 6 at Manchester City Cemetery with Dr. James Church Announcements There will be a singing at Grace Family Church, corner of Second Street and Third Avenue in Manchester, July 17th at 7 p.m. Special singers will be"Sunrise" from Ashville, Alabama. Pastor is Bruce Brown. Everyone is welcome. Dedication Services Set The Springfield Baptist Church will be ded- icating its parking lot on Sunday, July 18 at 2:30 p.m. At 304 Carter Street in Greenville, Georgia 30222. The Rev. Frank Dean and congregation of the Union Chapel Methodist Church of LaGrange will be the speaker. Everyone is invited to come out and share this occasion with us. Springfield Baptist Church Greenville, Georgia. Friendship Homecoming The New Friendship Baptist Church located on Jones Mill Road, Woodbury will have home- coming on Sunday, July 18th. Bringing thet ing message will be Bro. Otis Hodnett. Gospel Messengers will be singing in the t noon. Cedar Rock Sets Cedar Rock Baptist Church, will have homecoming Sunday mornin: at 11:00 a.m. Bro. R.L. Brazell will preach ner on the grounds and gospel "Cornerstone". Monday thru Friday, July ices will be held beginning at 7:30 p.m night. Bro. Tommy MacLeroy, All Baptist Church, Hogansville, ing. Everyone is invited! VBS at West End B, Children ages 3 through 11 are invited Castle Faire VBS on Sunday, July 18th Thursday, July 22 at West End Baptist in Manchester. Classes will be held p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Griffith officiating. Mr. Brown was born March 12, 1908 in Meriwether County, son of the late Julius C. and Freddie Mae Wright Brown. He was a retired master mechan- ic with 3cahoard Coastline Railroad, member of Manchester First Baptist Church, was a 32nd Degree Mason and a Shriner. Survivors include two daughters, Jackie Cole of Jackson, and Grayce Simmons of Tybee Island; one sister, Johnnye Harris of Manchester; five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, Blanche C. Brown. Smith-Steele-Meadows Funeral Home of Manchester was in charge of arrangements. Martha Jossey Simonton Greenville - Martha Jossey Simonton, 95, died July 10 at Molena Nursing Home. Graveside services were held at Greenville City Cemetery July 11 with Rev. Marion Shivers, pastor of Gay United Methodist Church, officiating. Honorary pallbearers were former pupuls D.R. Ward, Pitts Culpepper, John Gaston, Penson Hill, Vernon Phillips, Billy Norris, Cy Gasses, and Donald Roberts. Miss Simonton was born April 30, 1904 in daughter of the late Thomas and Jimmie Skelton Simonton. She was a retired first: teacher, member of United Methodist was an avid gardener. taught first grade at Elementary School for 421 urviving is a Turtier of Gay. Contributions in Miss Simonton may be Greenville Cemetery Pitts Culpepper, P.O. Greenville, GA 30222. Cox Funeral Manchester was in arrangements. Reading Club Deadline July 1 Turn in completed book list by July 19 for awards in the Hogansville Public Library's Summer Reading Club in order to receive prizes at the "Recognition and Awards" pro- grams on July 22 at the library. Door prizes and refreshments are part of the fun. Both programs are at the Hogansville Public Library. The Primary Program is sched- uled at 10:30 a.m. And the Intermediate and Young Adult Program beings at 1:30 p.,. "Chilling Stories about Famous- Americans" were heard on July 8 at the Hogansville Public Library's Summer Reading Club. Fireworks and flag waving were the theme for the day. Our youth Librarian, Yvonne Blcdsoe, talked about and dis- played the flag of the United States. Each star is representa- tive of each of the fifty states. She pointed out the start that represents Georgia. If you did- n't know which one, Georgia is the fourth star on the top row, since it was the fourth state of the original thirteen to ratify the Constitution on January 2, 1788. Ms. Bledsoe read excerpts from several juvenile books about our flag. These included Our Flag by Carl Memling, Our Country's Flag by Nicholas Georgiady and Louis Romano, and from About our Country's Flag by Nicholas Georgiady and Louis Romano, and from About our Flag by Elinor Rees that tells the story about George Washington's visit to Betsy Ross who made our first flag for him to fly over the army. She told the story of how Thomas Jefferson labored nora stop for eighteen days. HardlIJ sleeping, he wrote and re-wrote and struggled to express the feelings of all the colonies about this fledging county. His hard work paid off in the wonderfully chilling words from the Declaration of Independence that we hold dear to this day. "..We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal... With certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness..." Jefferson loved to learn. Ms. Bledsoe shared a 1783 letter that Jefferson wrote to his daughter, Patsy, age 11, in which he outlined a chilling schedule for her to follow each day. From 8 o'clock in the morn- ing until bedtime, she was to practice her music, dancing, drawing, writing, and reading Library news ;, ! .ft Jane Cheatham Gottshall, French and English. And the most chilling fact about Thomas Jefferson is that he died on July 4, 1826, which was the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. Known to history as the third President of the United States, who authored the Declaration of Independence and for his ability as an inventor and archi tect, he felt the most important thing.'he'd ever done was to write the Declaration of Independence. Ms. Bledsoe used the books Thomas Jefferson: A Photo- Illustrated Biography by T. M. Use! and Thomas Jefferson: Auth6r of Independence by Anne Colver as sources for these stories. Ms. Bledsoe read Paul Revere and the Minutemen: A Narrative Poem by Carole Charles and illustrated by Bob Seible. This is the chilling account, written in rhyme with wonder- ful pictures, of the reasons for Paul Revere's ride and the sub- sequent confrontations between the British and the Minutemen, which in effect began the Revolutionary War. The last story was truly the most chilling. A young and an old soldier exchange feelings about the hard spent at Valley Forge. at Valley Forge: A 'P6m by, Carle Chi#les tically portra3 endured by the the Revolutionary Seible's illustrations realism of the story. The description of without shoes leaving t footprints in the snow the chilling picture rifices made by many freedom. Eagle pictures on of our meeting room much discussion national bird. Ms. explained that it was a symbol for our because of its strength. After more discu fireworks and why we brate Independence Day, time for a song. With the' to "This Land I,, Woody Guthrie from issue of Hi Children, he dren gave a spirited of this expressive Everyone received a and Read" book bag. "Pre-School ages three to Hogansville Public scheduled to resume 19. All preschoolers are ed to attend our Reading Club July. Hogansville Public Hours during Daylight Time are from 2:00 to Monday, and Friday, 11:00 a.m. p.m. a.m. to 12 noon on OIcIsmobile. Genuine Chevrolet" Start Something US Hw/. 27 New Fronklin Rooo 706.882.2576 . 1.800.7