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July 15, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
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OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JULY 15, 1999 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS ), {6rh luhltcatign Millard B. Gdmes, President USPS 620-O40 MJI Itn PUBLISItF'JAJ),RTI SING O IRFI'OR JOHN Kuma, ASSOCIATE PUBIJSHFJC/EDITOR IUUON (TED) SMrm MANAGING EDITORHNICAL DW, ECrOR WnJ3acr BUSINESS Iq_ANAGER J Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O, Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Ok.ia/ Legal OrD,1, C i O'  Hogamville Having New Eyes "The real voyage of discov- ery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes." - Marcel Proust When was the last time you felt the exhilarating rush of pure personal freedom? The kind of freedom the last day of school brought when you were a kid. The last time I felt a true sense of liberated exhilaration was the summer I married Mr. Clark, some 20 years ago now. We were young and about to start into a bunch of new and exciting things. Mr. (/lark had just graduat- ed from college and I was about to go back, after a rough cou- ple of years doing other things. We moved into a beautiful third floor apartment in a recently restored old house and we had the world by the tail (or so it seemed.) The sky was the limit as to how great things were going to be... But, we wanted to take a trip, a trip to Mexico, sort of a "last hurrah" before we buckled down and became adults; and, we didn't have the funds to finance such an event. Mr. Clark's "real job" as a freshty-grakmt computer professional hadn't started yet; and, my waitressing money barely paid the bills. So, we hatched a plan to net us the cash for our much-desired trip. Knowing that our relatives would have no idea what to get a silly pair of non-materialistic Hippy newlyweds (who already had been co-habitating for awhile) we decided to get mar- ried, assuming that cash wold be the perfect gift. We planned our wedding quickly, after reserving airline tickets to Cancun, of course; and were married three weeks later - outdoors, by a friend's mountain pond. I remember the excitement of those days - planning the wedding, arranging the flow- ers, fixing the food (it was low budget, do-it-yoursclf, young Hippie kind of event) I remem- ber the unbridles exhilaration of it all - the end of one entire period of life and the beginning of the next! The wedding was wonderful - everything I hoped it would be - and the trip was as freedom filled as we had envisioned. (You have to be young and exhilarated to have only bliss-filled memories of a week spent in Mexico, in August, staying in a straw hut by the beach in "hamacas mat- rimonialis,"a pair of hammocks hung side-by-side.) We returned, tan, relaxed and ready to face adult-life, Lodn Sinn- Clark which is pretty much what we did. It turned out that was our "last hurrah" in terms of any type of personal freedom and we have not been exhilarated since. But, as much as I'd like to spend just one more day as excited s the kids about to grad- uate, I wouldn't exchange one piece of my "adult" wisdom for it. For everything there is a time and a place. When we planned that wed- ding we didn't expect things to last. Our relatives probably did- n't either - hence the cash prizes, rather than lasting wed- ding gifts. 'Life surprises you, though, and we're still here - having made it through two kids, sev- eral houses, a hunch of cards, money stuff, a cross-country move, and a lot of career and personal change. You have"t accept that th/ngs rarely turn out like you plan; a lot of times they're even better. I never dreamed giving up those times of exhilarated personal freedom would net me the truly blessed (if not exhil- arating or freedom-filled) "adult" life that I have. Sometimes I hanker for a dose of pure personal freedom. But, you have to be careful in my time of life. You can get yourself in trouble - too zeal- ously craving that and lose some valuable things along the way. The best you can achieve, once you reach a certain point, may be a different version of "adult" . reality. The key becomes to gracefully accept that itain't gonna be that good again, then learn to look with different eyes. That child graduating can be a new beginning for morn or dait. Starting a new job may be the rush you need. Paying off a debt or putting money aside can be quite exhilarating; and, sometimes quitting a bad job can be just the thing. There's always vacations, Sunday mornings and those occasional afternoons that belong only to you... Who knows what kind of exhilaration tomorrow might bring? The key is to simply remem- ber to consciously and enthusi- astically savor the simplest things. THE HOGANSVn.I  NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grin Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-0. Subscription rates by mail: $15 in Meriwether, Talbot or Hams Counties: $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Gorg 30230. Foe suascamrmNs call (706) 846-3 ! 88 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816. POSTMASTEm Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville, GA 30230. STAW Publisher and Advertising Director ..................................................................... Mike Hale, Associate Publisher and Editor .......  .............. . ........................................... John Kuykendall Managing Editor and Technical Director ...................................... '....Marion (Ted) Smith Business Manager ....................................................................................... LeeAnn Wilben Associate Editors .......................... Billy Bryant/Talboaon, Michael Snider/Hams County Dan Stont/itogansville. Caroline Yeager/GreenviLle Assistant Advertising Manager ............... :; ....................................................... Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Lmda Lester Photography ................................................................................................... Michael Snider Features ............................................................................................................... Lain A. Pike Composing ................................................................................... Valinda lvery, Dori Green Legals ................................................................................................................ Valmda lvery Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Clem Young Pressroom ....................................................................... David Soggs, Wayne Grochowski C O'cg President ......................................................................................................... Millard Gnmes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ i.amra Grimes Corer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Gatmtt Legal Counsel and Assistant  ..................................................... James S. Grimes That's All It Takes Recently, I had to go and get my spiritual tanks topped off. There comes a time when we all have to "hit the pits" for a splash of life-givlng substance before we finish a race, or in my case, a year. That happens for me some- where around the end of May or first of June, which I have declared vacation week. Life in general takes a lot out of a person, and over this last year I not only needed the splash of gas, but a set of new tires, too. It isn't enough that I'm once again indulging my fantasies by buying another sports car, but I'm also getting my daughter married and remodeling most of my house all in the same sum- mer. Well, if you gotta do it you might as well do it all at the same time and get it over with. That's why I needed this vacation so badly. Normally it takes about six hours to reach the Georgia coast, but the traffic was light and my foot was a bit heavier than usual and we made it in a little over four. Driving in the heat and traf- fic doesn't always help sustain a relationship, so my wife was very glad when I reached the island and my features began to stop resembling those of "Taz", as in Tasmanian Devil. It helps if you already have reservations when you do this for Me sort of thing, but we didn't. It was hot, and so werre we when I pulled in to the first motel. Jekyll Island is usually lazy about this time of year, but for some reason everybody that needed to have a convention decided this was the time to do it and Jekyll was the place. I've never seen so many tour buses in such a small area since the Gray Line did a tour of the interstate highways around metro Atlanta last summer. Our usual haunt wasn't a consideration this year and that's why we went without reservations. Last time they put us under a room that leaked air conditioning coolant on our bal- cony. It's nice to have a short rain shower every evening to remind one that he is in the tropics, but all day long is ridiculous. I did- n't know those things could hold that much freon. Excuse me, I mean R134. Anyway, after more tries than I can recall right now to find lodging, we got a little tired and checked in at the Holiday Inn. You cm--.'t see the ocean from there and they don't fly the state flag, which I'm still upset about, but I was desperate so I followed the instructions on the coffee mug which sits near the back of my desk that says, "If all else fails, lower your standards." I go to the islands to enjoy peace and quiet. Now, I know most of you have been to the to Jim Dale Columnist Florida coast and wonder if I'm confusing peace and quiet with tourism and the development that follows it to the water The answer is no, because some parts of the Georgia coast, so far, are basically untouched by that kind of overkill you see on our neighboring state's shores If you are pretty good at out- running mosquitoes and horse- flies, and don't mind the wind blowing your hair in every direction then you can walk down a beach without having to stel5 over someone every few feet. And you watch dolphins fol- lowing the shrimp boats only a hundred or so yards off the shore. That's all it takes for me to get renewed. My wife can only take so much of this communing with nature before she's ready to go inside and read a book or take a nap. Of course, eating is also a renewal effort. This time I was careful. You see, I've lost thir- ty pounds and it's important that Get Renewed I don't gain it back; my won't fit again. So, included) tried to "cool the chow. I decided to be tire in my choices of eat, placing my F decor instead of the food I have to recommend a on St. Simons Island Mullet Bay. We ate on the covered that surrounds the is separated from the tropical plants that make feel like, well, you're in thel ics. Where else? The overhead ceiling and trophy fish hanging inside walls sort of of being at one of Hemmingway's hanl Key West. We split a grilled chicken sandwich. Do you know can make eating chicken s wiches a romantic So, as you can see my spirit renewed ready for another year. me enou under the checkered flag, still have energy enough t a few donuts." So those sports cars, receptions and 1: and another year. By the way, of them do you say are before I can retire and this all the time? Warm Springs Becomes Health Facility (Amther in a series) Some of Franklin Roosevelt's friends and mem- bers of the growing staff at Warm Springs suggested to him in 1927 that he concentrate on the therapeutic part-  Warm Springs operation, and abandon efforts to build a Georgia "Pinehurst", or upscale resort. Roosevelt felt he needed the money from the non-polio cus- tomers, and he didn't have a large enough medical staff to make Warm Springs into a rec- ognized health facility. He had hired Dr. Leroy W. Hubbard in 1926, who had just retired from the New York State Board of Health, to be the sur- geon in chief, and Helena Mahoney had the title of Director of Nurses. Both had had experience with polio patients, but she had a more dynamic personality than Hubbard and for the first few years she probably had more to do with the develop- ment of the after-care programs than did Dr. Hubbard or "Dr." Roosevelt. Dr. Hubbard had three years' experience as an ortho- pedic surgeon, dealing with after-care of polio patients; that was important. But Warm Springs still had difficulty get- ting the professional accept- ance that Roosevelt wanted. The American Orthopedic Association held its annual meeting in Atlanta the spring Roosevelt bought Warm Springs. He went to Atlanta and lob- bied with orthopedists and asso- ciation officials to get Warm Springs in some way supported by the association. They turned him down. Despite that setback, and because of growing friction between polios and vacationers, Roosevelt reluctantlydecided in 1927 to make Warm Springs a full time health spa, not a resort. The corporation that had been established with profit-making as a goal was replaced by the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, Inc. Roosevelt was president, as he had been of the initial corporation. The trustees of the founda- tion were all directors of the earlier corporation: Dr. Hubbard, George Foster Peabody, and the two business- men whose daughters' polio had introduced them to Warm Springs and Roosevelt, Henry Pope and James Whitehead. It was Roosevelt's belief that wealthy individuals like Peabody, Pope and Whitehead would support the Warm Springs venture as a favorite philanthropy. But in the next few years, Roosevelt himself was the major - though not the exclusive - supporter of his dream. It was his money, or the guarantee of it, that made it pos- sible for the gap between inad- equate income and the costs of the enterprise to be made up. The early effort of the ven- ture proved costly. Dr. Hubbard and Mahoney were joined by a physiotherapist, Helen Lauer, then another and soon a corps of "physics", as they were called. These were young female graduates in physical education from Nashville's Peabody College. Their job was to work with The Squire of Warm By-00 the patients in the pool, forcing them to move muscles they couldn't move themselves, teaching them to move muscles they only thought they couldn't move, developing strengths to compensate for muscles that would never regain function. This was the central activi- ty at Warm Springs in the first years, before there was a hos- pital for corrective surgery. The polios and the physics would get into the pools together. The polio would sit, lie or be strapped in some fashion, depending on the type of afflic- tion, to an underwater table, and the physic would begin coerc- ing limb movement. There were some dozen physics by 1928. Fred Botts had become regis- trar. Another polio, Arthur Carpenter, who came down from Connecticut for treatment in 1927, was soon to become business manager. There had been only 33 ,, " ,, polios- or compamons as they began to call themselves - at Warm Springs at the end of the 1926 season, by an unofficial count. In 1927, there were some 80 companions at an informal Thanksgiving dinner to end the season. Patients then were paying $42 a week for "room treatment, use of the transportation to and same," as Mahoney put it letter the inn or a was necessary, since the l distance was too far for all the polios, even the oneS! could walk. It was provided first old touring car, then in a the numbers increased. bodied friends or accompanied tions paid $28 a week for and board. Neither figure true costs of the that time. Roosevelt was checks or signing notes abandon. For example, in 1927 he wrote checks Curtis, then Meriwether Reserve $4,500, $5,000, $2 $6,8oo. That year all other butions from friends ning this place, ing everything up," Veeder (nee Hudson), a 1928, said years later. "The all went to Hyde Park." It was not just Roosevelt was was still "Dr." gesting therapies to and staff alike. He was involved in such sketchinga design for the] Ford pool, designing a chair that made it to move in and out of it. (Next week: Return to tics.) Buck Belue: Remembering Coach Bazemo00 Living legends are a rare breed, indeed. It's not often in life, we have the opportunity to hang around greatness, and observe their day to day behav- ior. Looking back on my days as an athlete, I "truly feel blessed. My path led to experi- ences with some of the great- est coaches to ever roam the sideline. Wright Brazemore is at the top of the list. Sure, I understand my days around Coach Bazemore, were lived during my impressionable years. But even now, as an adult, I feel the same way. Paul "Bear" Bryant also made a huge impression on me, during my recruitment, as a high school senior, and anoth- er, in the East-West Shrine College All-Star game. The man could make a room silent by simply walking in. He could also bring down the chandelier with one of his inspirational tirades. Memorable times, around a great football coach, no doubt. "Belue, I see you want to play baseball too." Coach Bryant asked me in his office on the Alabama campus, dur- ing my recruiting visit "Yes. sir, Coach," I said meekly. "Son, we've never hada foot- ball player on scholarship play baseball, and we sure as hell are not going to start with you," the Bear growled. Man, now that was funny, although I did not laugh at the time. But it was obvious to me, Bear Bryant enjoyed the inter- action with the young men that Buck Belue Columnist .... i crossed his path. He was spe- cial. Not one young man that played for Coach Bryant will ever forget the impact he had on their lives. Erk Russell was cut from the same breed. He touched people in a special way, on and off the field. Sure, Coach Russell knew football, inside and out...but it was his ability to motivate and communicate that completed his status in my book. coaches out there can one minute, and play with you the next. I have so memories of but I must admit, my is a no-brainer. November, Auburn, Alabama... the ': had just clinched the Championship, by whipp Tigers, one week after Scott burned the GatorS that 92 yard touchdown. As we celebrated lockeroom, Erk made around, with a hug and cigar for each Coach Wright Valdosta was a man for