"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
July 17, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
July 17, 2003
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVIIa HOME NEWS - JULY 17, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 62o-04o Millard B. Grimes, President MIKE HAI PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISItERDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOWN BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansvflle, Georgia 30230 My, My, How Time Does Fly! My, my how time flies! It's hard to believe, but it was ten years ago this week that I returned home (meaning Harris, Meriwether, Talbot and Troup) to rejoin this group of newspapers. So much has happened in the past ten years and they have gone by so quickly. Honestly, I didn't realize it had been so long until recent- ly when it was pointed out to me by our owner Millard Grimes. Over the next few weeks, my column will be dedicated to a series of articles, some reprints from ten years ago, as a reminder to myself and our readers what the past ten years have meant to all of us. The first column in this series begins this week with the original column written ten years ago announcing my return: After 15 years my news- paper career has come full- circle. It seem like only yes- terday that I walked through the doors at Trib Publications for the first time. The date was July 5, 1978. My career started with my hometown newspaper, The Harris County Journal. A young upstart and not very educated in the ways of the world, I was only with The Journal for six months before being transferred to a sister group of weeklies which served Marion, Schley, Stewart and Webster coun- ties. I spent the next seven years as editor of the Stewart- Webster Journal and Patriot- Citizen. Eventually, I was promot- ed to general manager and spent about four years man- aging the The Phenix Citizen, the Columbus Weekly Shopper, The Stewart- Webster Journal and The Patriot-Citizen. Trib purchased a newspa- per in Centreville, AL. and I was chosen to serve as gen- eral manager of that publica- tion. While in Centreville, I was offered a job by Valley Times-News in Lanett and on March 1, 1989 I began my career at Valley as sports edi- tor. Six months later I was promoted to managing editor and by the end of my first year, was promoted to assis- tant general manager. Obviously, my career in weekly newspapers had pre- pared me well for the daily challenge. For five years I served as assistant general manager and managing edi- tor for The Valley Times- News. Then I heard that Trib Publications was seeking for a new editor for The Harris County Journal. What a chal- lenge! I thought. So, here I am, back again. While many may think a weekly newspaper does not offer the challenge a daily would, nothing could be fur- ther from the truth. A week- ly is most often a one man operation. You are responsi- ble for writing the news, sell- ing the advertising, produc- tion of the newspaper and sometimes even working in the pressroom and delivery. Some may wonder why I decided to return to a week- ly newspaper. That's simple. I attended Harris County High and my friends and fam- fly still live in Harris County. For some years now, I have coached Little League base- ball and youth football in the county. I have watched these young men and women grow into young adults, and real- ize the potential they have as leaders. They will enhance what is already one of the greatest places in the world to live and raise and family. I would like to play a small part in helping Harris County, and the surrounding communities, to continue to grow and prosper. As editor of The Journal, it is my desire to help the newspaper serve the residents of the county well. As a resident of the coun- ty, I have the same concerns and hopes for the future that our readers share. By work- ing together, maybe we can accomplish the things that will make our county a bet- ter place for everyone. I am looking forward to sharing ideas with everyone to make our county and our newspaper better for every- one. As I said, ten years is a long time and Harris County and the surrounding areas have changed a great deal. So have our newspapers. While the newspapers have improved a tremendous amount, there is still much to be done. I hope I can spend the next ten years trying to make them, and the commu- nity, better for everyone. THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Gdmes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway. Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Tmup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all les taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Geoia 30230. FOR SUBSCRIVrIONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, 1.O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA .30230. STAff Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Asiate Publisherand Editor ............................................................ John Kuykeudall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Rich'son StaffWriters ................................................ Bryan Geter. Billy Bryan, Clint Claybrook Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Composing ....................................... V',.dinda Ivery, Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems Legals ............................................................... : ...................................... Jayne Goldston Circulation Manager ..................................................................................... Judy Crews Production Manager. ................ v ......................................................... Bobby Brazil Jr. Assistant Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pressnm ................................. Z ....... Damell McC_.auley, Joey Knight Larry Colleges t:ORPORATE UFICERS Flesidem ............................................................................................. Mill',mi B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. C'harlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Coun.l and Assi,,ant Secretary .............................................. James S. Grimes Making Up Means 'Give and Wr/tten in 1979 band and wife. she'll turn on you if I remain convinced love conquers all, even in this day and time of rampant divorces and the breakdown of the family. Take the recent example of the lovely Oregon couple, John and Greta Rideout. Greta called the cops on her husband one day and clain'md he raped her. John said everybody knew you couldn't rape your own wife. That would be like stealing your own car. A messy and much publi- cized trial resulted. Besides raping her, Greta said, anoth- er thing she didn't like about her husband was that he did- n't keep his fingernails neat and clean. John countered and said Greta had these weirdo sexual fantasies that didn't include him. Luckily for husbands everywhere, the jury said, "Not guilty." But that was not the end of the story. Almost before the jury could get out of its box, Greta and John announced they had resolved their differences and were returning home to live as hus- If John and Greta Rideout can patch things up again, anybody can. Including the Marietta couple that was divorced last week. I couldn't believe my eyes as I read news reports of what finally put their marriage asunder. It happened last October. On Halloween night. THERE STOOD the wife, who was separated from her husband at the time, minding her own business'in her kitchen. Into the room walked the muscular figure of the man she married. He's an avid weightlifter, so the story goes. He was dressed in the cos- tume of the television char- acter, the "Incredible Hulk," all green and scary looking. On television, the "Incredible Hulk" is a quiet unassuming, puny physicist who has this chemical imbalance in his body. When riled, the physicist swells to several times his normal size, and his face changes into something that would scare a dog off a meat wagon. Frightening his wife right out of her apron wasn't enough for the Cobb Clonker, by day a pharmacist. According to the news story, he also pounded his wife one to the head, rendering her unconscious as they say at police headquarters. He denied belting her and said he had simply dropped by her kitchen on his way to a Halloween party where he later won"oest costume" after eating the glass punch bowl. The divorce was granted last week. I called authorities in Cobb County for further details. I was told the man is presently free on a $3,000 peace bond following anoth- er assault on his wife. "What drives us crazy," a Cobb officer said, "is when you go into one of these things where the man has beaten his old lady and she wants him thrown in jail, sometimes to take him by force. 'These officers went i was all bloody and Two or three crying, and the man drunk. They tried to to jail, and he put up "Before woman and the were breaking things the officer's heads. knocked the brim one officer's Stetson." That's what I was When the going love can still overcome greatest obstacles. I there is definite ex-couple from He wants to be "Incredible Hulk." Fine. could dress up like Woman." Give and That's the answer. ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE L GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN BY MORELAND MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS TIME. BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL JI PRODIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC WIDE. 0000dvice on Living in this World There is a hymn we sing here at Antioch with the title "Where Would I Go". In this song there is a line that says, living in this old sinful world, hardly a comfort can afford. In these days of a strug- gling, slowing, sagging, and sad economy, how is one to live? What should the atti- tude and actions of the child of God be? These difficult days fueled by the events of September 11, have taken their toll on many Americans. Even in our chdCh there are those who are feeling the effects of the current eco- nomic slow down. During these days, what are we sup- posed to do? The first thing we must realize is that although the child of God is in the world, he is not of the world. Jesus said in John 17,"They are not of the world..." When a child of God begins to live like they are of the world and not just in the world, then problems begin. As we consider the thought of how to live in this world in these days, one man comes to mind: Abraham. Apart from the Lord Jesus, Abraham is probably one of the most prominent charac- ters of scripture. In the book of Genesis, the first eleven chapters cover the first 2000 years of human history, but the next fourteen chapters cover the life and times of one man and his family, the man named Abraham. Abraham is the only man in the Bible that is actually called the friend of God. This man Agraham tells us how we can live in this world below. MANY THINGS can be said about Abrahafit, but what Paul says in Romans 4:11 sums up the life of Abraham. Paul called Abraham the father of the faithful. What we learn from Abraham is how to walk by faith and not by sight. Abraham was indeed a man of faith. He was a man saved by faith, lived by faith, obeyed by faith and worked by faith. One man has given Abraham the title: Dean of the School of Faith. In short, to live in this world below, the child of God need not fret, because he is to live by faith. To live by faith is to not be affected by the things that are seen, but to trust the things that are not seen. That may seem like a silly "...In reality folks liue, eve_0000 .=day counting on things that are not seen." thing to some, but in reality folks live everyday counting on things that are not seen. For one, people have not seen their brain, but they count on it to remember the way to work, where they put their car keys and the like. Living by faith is not a blind leap, but a life founded on the promises of God. As the old hymn says, we are to trust and obey, for there is no other way. When the govern- ment, news analysts and economists look at all the indi- caters and make announcement that r Is the to panic. Although omy may be in a God is not in recession. are too many people in the world around rather than the Word before them. Paul church at Corinth, "For walk by faith and not statement that "Faith is believing in spite 4' ! dence, it is believing of the consequence." The writer to Hebrews said we are to to Jesus the author and isher of our faith. To live in this below, live looking to, ing on and learning Lord Jesus Christ. For child of God, it is God I ing our lives and not Street, Madison Ave, Rodeo Drive. looking could because he did his roots deep into To live in this world bY is to have our existence: but our expectations above. k M *BUSY WEEK - Front page items July 16, dance, the postmaster transferring and evidence Hogansville was still pany town," with three highly favorable ' des on U.S. Rubber Company. CINEMA - Movies showing at the Theatre included the Lugosi Meets a Brooklyn Gorilla,' with Mickey Rooney and 'Dangerous When Wet' with IN STORE - Baldwin's Market tised chopped beef for $.49 and the ing-sounding 'Cook Kill' at $.98 per quart. ad also noted, in a personal touch, '1 of one that charged 75 cents for four of lard. He must have wanted to go to and have a good time." Meanwhile, had five pounds of potatoes for 25 centS= eight ounces of cocktail nuts for 35 Henson Fumi 'Easy for U to Pay' credit plan, which tured the pledge *WANT AD STANDOUTS: An package deal of a five-room house, Plymouth, a garden tractor and for chickens. *TWO MINOR DETAILS: 'q'his is best month to freeze vegetables, Shackleford - if you have a freezer etables."