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Manchester, Georgia
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July 22, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
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July 22, 2004
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4-A - HOGANSVnZ~ HOME t - THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2004 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 l~llard B. Gdm~, President JOHN KUYKENDALL PtrBIJSHER/EDrrOR LALram ADWZRaaSLN G Dmxz~'roR O.AVnROOK ASSOCIATE EDITOR RoB ICa~ ASSISTANT EDITOR Phone (706) 84(>3188 Fax (706) 846-2206 1~ O. Box 426 HogansviUe, GeorRia 30230 Love and Compassion Help Children Grow If you are a country music fan, there are several new songs out there right now that are really good, but Lonestar has one in particular that every parent should have a copy of. I purchased the CD recently and wanted it for the song "Let's Be Us Again." It is a wonderful song. After I purchased the CD, I noticed it contained a song that speaks about allowing chil:' dren to enjoy life. What a great song. It pretty much says that we should allow them to cry, let them giggle and be chil- tlren. In other words, simply let them grow, develop and enjoy life. It really puts a lot into perspective when it comes to dealing with chil- dren. Most people do not real- ize that children develop at a very young age. It is during those years that we as par- ents help develop the man or woman they will grow up to be. Having raised two chil- dren, and looking back today, I realize that I was not the perfect parent. I made plen- ty of mistakes, but feel that I did~a pretty good job rais- ing my children. They are both grown now and I'm extremely proud of them. Of course, I can't take all the credit I did have some help from my wife. LOOKING BACK, there are plenty of things I would have done differently, of course. Growing older, devel- oping wisdom and simply l~g from the mistakes I did make has helped me to realize that it's all right to make mistakes; it's what you learn from the mistake that really matters. Brannon, my son, was the first born. The wife and I probably spoiled him more than Bethany, our daughter, because he was the f~st. There was not a day that went by when he was a ~mall child that he didn't receive a great deal of attention from both of us. We read to hii~ almost every night. As he grew older and began participating in youth sports, I spent hours at prac- tices and games. The wife was always supportive with working concession stands and doing other things. Our daughter liked tak- Lug dance classes: I suffered through several recitals. The point is, we took time for the things they liked and not only did we support them but participated as much as we could. One thing the both of them always knew in their hearts was that they were dearly loved by both of us. NOW, I HAVE a grand- child. I spoil him too much. Most grandparents probably do. I spend time with him when I can and I try to take interest in things he likes as much as possible. Heck, I canX tell you how many times he has beaten me in video games, visited Hollywood Connections and .all those other places that old men would never go except with their grandchild. My children think I do more for him than I did for them when they were grow- ing up. Of course, that's not true, but you would never make them believe that. Anyway, the point is, my grandson as well knows that his grandfather loves him very much. THAT IS THE second point of the song. It simply states that helping your child to grow and develop is not just enough, but you have to love them, as well. Sometimes loving them means havingto do things you don't want to do. Thus the term "hard love." Most par- ents find it difficult to pun- ish their children. My father never did. He would always tell me, "This is going to hurt me more than it does you." Now that I've raised children of my own, I know exactly what he meant by that. It hurt me each and every time I had to pun- ish one of my children. However, I knew that by pun- ishing them I was teaching them a lesson that would stay with them a lifetime. It is how you establish that had choic- es come with a price, disci- pline and respect for author- ity. Don't get me wrong. I'm not in favor of abusing a child. I'm simply saying that love and discipline are what mold your children. I did make mistakes with my children, but not loving them enough or not punish- ing them for doing wrong was not among them. As the song says, let them cry, giggle and grow and do it with love. THE HOGANSVILLg HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup. Harris or Meriwether Counties: $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230.Single cop), 50. FOR SVBSCP.WnONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulatkm Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426. Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Editor ............................................................................ John Kukyendall Advertising Director .................................................................................. Laurie Lewis Associate Editor ................................................................................... Oint Claybrook Assistant Editor ..................... ' ................................................................ Rob Richardson Staff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy'Bryant Composition .............................. Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems, Gari Yoongbloed Circulation Manager. .......................................................................... Tracy Lynn Wyatt Press Manager ................................................................................. Wayne Groch~vski Pressroom Assistants ..................................... Zaddie Dixon.Damell McCauley Mailroom Distribution ............................................................................... David Boggs COm, O~TE OF~ICE~S President ........................ :....] ............................................................... Millard B. Grinms Wine President .......... ; ................................................................ :......Chaxlotm S. Grin,,cs Executive Vice ~ldent and Secretary. ....................................... Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer ................................. ; ..................................................... Kathy Gri~ Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Grimes Life at the School in From Lewis Grizzard's collection "If Love Were Oil, l'd Be About a Quart Ixn~' Written in 1979 My eighth grade class in Moreland had totaled less than 30 and only about half of those were girls, and five or six of them you wouldn't take to a rat killing. But high school! There were girls everywhere. Despite the fact the female population at Newnan High was larger than what I was used to by a hundredfold, I was still hampered by two factors: One, I has just turned 14 and was still two long, ago- nizing years away from hav- ing my driver's license. Whereas Willard Haines and only a few other older boys in Moreland had cars, high school was filled with licensees from the eleventh and twelfth grades, and they were constantly shopping in the lower grades for dates, because girls their age were dating college boys by that time. Obtaining female com- panionship in the formative years is an eat-the-next-fish- smaUer-than-you sort of proposition. Two, and this is something I hadn't counted on, there was a sort of loose, unwritten rule that implored county riffraff to keep away from the well- coifed, well-dressed young ladies of the city establish- ment. That problem could be overcome; I noticed if one happened to be an athlete or was willing to settle for one of the uglier Newnan girls, who were just as desperate for attention as the county fel- lows. "I DECIDED to try the ath- letic route. Because I had taken my physical appear- ance from my mother's side of the family - I was quite thin- I decided not to risk my life playing football, as much as I figured that was the sport with the most potential for latching on to a Newnan girl. Instead, I went out for the jun- ior varsity basketball team. I made the squad and became an immediate starter. I thought perhaps my first move would be on a member of the girls junior varsity team; but it was at that point I learned something else about females of that era - if they played basketball, it meant they hadfft made it as a cheerleader and didn~ mind working up a sweat in public, both of which made me sus- pect of their potential, as far as future romantic possibili- ties were concerned. THE FIRST CHEER- LEADER to catch my eye dur- ing my freshman year of high school was a dazzling 14-year- old redhead from a well-to- do Newnan family. She whirled with the best of them, and she did seem to show some spark of interest when I hit her with my classic open- ing line, "Do you think pro- fessional wrestling is fake?" As a matter of fact, I fell quite hard and fast for this young beauty, and I thought I had scored further points with her when I allowed her to look on my paper during an ancient history exam, which tested our knowledge of the Punic Wars. She had no idea Rome and Carthage were squared off on the fields of combat. I was soon to learn, how- ever, that this new my affection didn't was a alist and more than share my ancient history already he was an eleventh with a car, who ball I looked ahead, could see were two years of being just skinny basketball from the sticks, er still bad to around. I thought of ing the to save me from panionless state, but most desperate hour lucky. It all started hayride. ...to be continued next ! BY SPF.CIAL WITH HIS WIDOW, ED COLUMNS BY THE GmZZ~R~WHO GREW ta, ~ BY MORELAND, MOST WIDELY READ BooKs AND TAPES ARZ STn,LA PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX A'I1ANI"A, GA 311151266 WIDE. Running Will Settle Absolutely There seems to be little doubt at this point that John Kerry and John Edwards will lead the Democratic Party this fall in their quest to unseat President Bush and the Republican Party from executive control in Washington. Today I am not sold on either party, and have not made up my mind how I will vote~ Republicans need to show more concern for aver- age working persons in this nation of ours and make an effort to shed the tag as being the '~aarty of the wealthy." THE STRONGER middle class we have in this country, the stronger the economy we will enjoy. No one wants to take from one segment and give to another, but all should be granted equal opportuni- ty. This part of me is Democratic. My thinking about the war in Iraq and the present situation there is much near- er President Bush's position than Democratic positions I have heard. You might say I'm more hawk than dove. LOOKING BACK, no doubt some mistakes have been made since the begin- ning of festivities in Iraq, but many of those, including Kerry and Edwards, voted to ~ milRm~ action in the beginning. President Bush and American intelligence had every reason to believe that Saddam Hussein was linked with Alqaida and weapons of mass destruction. Even today no one has proven to me this was not true. Democrats I have heard seem to have forgotten their stand on this situation earli- er and some have stooped to blaming President Bush for mass murder. They seem to have forgotten their position in the early stages of this Iraq conflict. I can understand the worry, grief and sorrow for loved ones stationed in Iraq. We feel for them and pray for their safe return home. IT SEEMS that most every young generation is called on to defend our American way of life. During World War II, before I was 20 years old, I earned four bat- fie stars in the Pacific. I cer- tainly was no hero, I did what millions of others did in those we did not tuck our! and run as many seem to advocate today. Several times end of World War American servicemen women have been called they have answered the when I today's Iraq ferent. When I was in knee but not start fights. I stflIl to this philosophy. I love to see this Iraq ended, but with no than an honorable The Democrats be saying, "Peace at price," and I sure along with that. What I would to see is a Republican who die class or a part~ up and fight for our given rights. 50 Years Ago... Inthe Hogansville Herald Pmd~eu~tothe Hogmsville tlome I~ws CNLLING PROPHESY-] his weekly column in the 22, 1954 Hogansville 4th District Sidney Camp wrote about p~ns for ~. ~ may be able to see you in to be in the district before the he wou~ be dead. ELECTRIFYING DENCE - The two highly-charged stories the front page. One was Mrs. Fred Redmond avoiding injury when struck the Redmond Store. The secohd stated "Phil Campbell of candidate for commissioner c ~,can~ ir~ ~ of. any aspirant lightning struck two next to a campa~n rally barbecue in his hon~. CINEMA TIME - The mo~e of the w~k m ~ Theatre was a show~ o~ "The Robe." frankly-forgettable flicks week were "The 1:~acing Blood," and'Paris Model." WANT AD WONDERS "Woman wanted. Several to mail postcards every Work home, spare lime."