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Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
July 25, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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July 25, 2002
 

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f / t Opini(00ns & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS "-'JULY 25, 2002 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62O-O4O A Grme Mili B. 0, MIKE HALE PUBLISHER]AD'T.RTISING DIR-TOR JOHN KUVKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISITOR ROB N ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE N BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Newspapers ,Are Very Different It's amazing how weekly and daily newspapers see sto- ries so differently and how hometown newspapers and radio and television stations differ from their larger com- petitors. I probably understand that better than most writers because over the years I've worked for both weeklies and a daily and understand how stories are handled by both. The recent visit by NASCAR driver Kurt Busch to Goody Products, Inc. was such an example. Goody Products brought Busch here to promote a new advertising campaign for ACE combs. The Newell Rubbermaid Company spon- sors Busch and the manufac- turer of ACE combs, is kicking off an advertising campaign that will feature Busch telling America to "Grab their ACE." The daily reporters on the scene wanted to talk with Busch about NASCAR; that was pretty much it. They were interested in how he felt his career was going, about the team concept of racing (since the incident in Formula One racing recent- ly when a team driver pulled over to allow one of his team members to win the race), and about racing safety. All of these make good reading for the NASCAR fan, which daily newspapers have a lot of. Weeklies have some NASCAR readers as weU. Don't get me wrong, but that's not what weekly newspaper readers look for in their "hometown" newspaper. THE DIFFERENCE in the way a local daily newspaper handled the story and the way our weekly newspaper handled the story was very vivi& The daily newspaper story was all about the things mentioned above, whileour stwasatx Busch being named an hon- orary citizen of the city, howthe warm reception of the , the community they serve. Actually, this topic was discussed by some of those attending the event without them realizing it. Bryan Gibson, C.J. Gibson and myself were all at the event and hung pretty close together because I rep- resent the local newspaper and Bryan and C.J. represent our local television station. It was funny how almost every- one at the event recognized us. Not all of those there were from Manchester, either. Some of them were from Harris County, Talbot County and other areas. While they recognized each of us and caJled us by name, it was easy to tell most people felt a little uncom- fortable with the folks from the larger television stations and newspapers. THE THING that stood out the most, though, was when it was photo opportuni: ty time and who was given the best opportunity to shoot it. Meriwether County Sheriff Steve Whiflock was taking photos with some of those gathered around Busch's car, I was shooting photos and so was a photog- rapher from one of the area's larger newspapers. The question was asked, "Which photographer those in the photo should look at?" The question was quickly answered when Steve was asked, "Which one will help get you elected?" Once the festivities moved inside, Manchester Mayor Dorsey Wilson pre- affetd him and, dcourse, the sented Busch with a key to reason for the evem. "\\;the city. During the presen- tion, he asked Busch, That is what the local read- er wants to read. In other words, the local angle of the story. Readers of weekly newspapers do not want to pick up their hometown newspaper and read about what's going on elsewhere, they only want to read about what is happening in their neighborhood, tow or county During the promotion by Goody Products, it also was pretty evident how being a community newspaper has it's advantages and what an important role they play in "Could you look at this gen- tleman right there? He's with OUt local newspaper." Obviously, while this was all done in good humor and a little jokingly, both Sheriff Whitlock and Mayor Wilson understand the important role the hometown newspa- per plays in the community. A hometown newspaper is more than just stories and photographs, it is supposed to be a reflection of the com- munity it serves. I hope ours always will be. THE HOGANSVlLLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchesr, Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subscription rates by mail: $1g in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all .sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Getxgia 30230. FoR stotnno" call (706) 846-3188 or write to Cirzulatioa Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426. Manches, Ge 31816. i R: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville, GA ?2. .STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director. .............................................................. Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor .............................................. ..................................... .Rob Richardson StaffWriters .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ............................ , ....................... ............ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ...................................................................................... JJnda Lesr Compusmg ........ ; ....................................................... .Dcwayn Rowers, Valinda Ivery Circulation Manager .................................................................................... lBdy Crews Lcgals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Gold.on Pressroom Manager ........................................................................ Wayne Grochowski Pressroom ........................................ David Boggs, Larry Colleges, Shannon Atldnson Coaro Oancs President ................................................................................... ; ........ Millard B. Grimes Vice President ..................................................................................  S. Grimes Secretary ........................... : .............................................................. Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garren Legal Counsel and Assistant Sectary .............................................. James S. Gdns Life Doesn't Permit I won't forget Friday, March 6, 1987, the day I final- ly was convinced the aging process had taken its toll upon me. I did't want to accept that. I turned 4O in October 1986, but I noted at the time I felt about the same as I did when I turned 18. My likes and dislikes had- n changed. I still liked corm- try music, and I still didn like Zng00hpeas. And I danced the night of my 4oth away, and my partner, younger than I was, compli- mented me on a number of my moves. "I may be worn," sings the Outlaw, Waylon Jennings, 'out I ain worn out." THEN, Friday, March 6, 1987. I had been invited to par- ticipate in a halftime show at the Southeastern Conference basketban tournament. I was to shoot free throws against a man named Ted St. Martin, the world's greatest freethrow shooter. You can look it up. Theopportunity to showoff my pure shooting eye in front of thousands of people was an exciting one. I bragged to my frieads, 'I was a legendary free throw shooter in high sclt" "Are you going to prac- rice?" I was aske& "Of course not," I replied. "I can sti get up on Christmas morning and hit eight out often without wanning up." I honestly believed that. I walked onto the court in Atlanta's OMNI as a hushed crowd watche& Mr. S. Martin handed me the bail I remembered my techn- nique. Hold the ball lightly with the fingers. Take a deep breath. Fix the eyes on the front of the rim of the basket. Bend the knees and release, following through with the flick of the wrist. I MISSED my first three shots. The ball didfft feel like I remembered a basketban feeling. The shots came off my hands like bricks rather than butterflies. I made my fourth shot, despite the fact that the bail hit several tons of metal My fifth shot was the dreaded "airbalU' It hit nothing but the floor. The crowd, turoing , chanted "Airball!! Airball!!" Disgrace. I would up hit- dn_g four of tea. Mr. St Martin didn As I leR the court, I am cer- tain I heard boos. m_ v i the Challenge to All Everyone that is a true born again Christian, trying to live their life in the will of God, is no stranger to the influences that Satan, through this world's system, exerts upon their life. Those influences come from all directions and take on many different forms. It matters not how old a person may be, every child of God feels the pressure from an ever decay- ing society. Whether we feel the pressure personally from an individual, publicly from a government that has turned theirS, or from a. community that is going to hell in a hand basket, the pres- sure to conform to the mold of this society is great. The standards of morality are falling, the importance of the church house in the life of families is declining, and the commitment to be a dedicat- ed Christian is quickly becoming a thing of the past. While the prostitute, the drug addict, the alcoholic, the homosexual and the crack houses are thriving, the child of God that stands for right, is becoming a minority. While the child of God feels the pressure from the world, we can hear the chal- lenge from the word of God to exert pressure and let the world feel the influence of a church on fire for God. You see, just as the church feels the pressure of the world, the world ought to feel the pres- sure of the church. In our schools, the ones who push the dope, carry the guns, make bomb threats and dis- respect authority ought to feel the pressure of godly young people who stand for what is right. In our commu- nities the p, alcoholics, perverts and the like ought to feel the pressure from Christians who have decided to take a stand for the truths found in the Bible. We as believers in Christ as Savior have a challenge from the lips of our Lord. Jesus tells his disciples in Matthew 5, "Ye are the salt of the earth." We all look around and can almost see our society dete- riorating. Many have won- dered what can be done. Tbereare those whohave said to close the crack houses, get rid of the pornography, or close the beer joints. The world in general will never get any better until Jesus comes, but one thing we know is this: if Christians would be what God has told them to be then in our4ittie r ofthe world, the dy can be slowed. I base that statement upon what Jesus said in Matthew 5. Salt does many things, but mainly, especial- ly in Bible days, salt was a preservative. When Christians are salty salt, then the decay in our society can be slowed. The Bible does not com- mand us to be salt, but rather Jesus states the fact that we are salt. The question today is, what kind of salt are we? What kind of influence do we have on those around us? Salt can never be not salt, but salt 50Years OIII Fve taken a "Hello, friends have said, "All hat, no cattle,' have observed. "But 20 years to explal "Twenty years interrupted, now." There's, ing that. Never let write a check cash. Truth. How sting. BY SPECIAL NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE G BY MORELAND, AND MOffr WIDELY READ wRrrER OF HIS TIME. PRODONS, P.O. ATL&NTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC STORI ' can can becom( that it loses its as salt. Christians be the salt of the Christians can contaminated that longer have any ness to influence munity for the glorY The answer to decay does not rest government, or l the problems. The for Christians to saints. If willing to be what er will decay lies on the of every The problem stated, given, and the been Christians in our Hogansvine will head out of the stand up for the found in the Word May God help us to t saints and exert a upon the society never been felt. Inthe The front page photo ofthe  Hogansville' sign noteS be a th heads for tal manufacturers( slor age" Otxle Trips Tuesday afternoon in the best games seen d local park this season, strong Dixie team the U.S. Royal Cords an exciting Pledge Sunday: Sunday is =pledge the that tklle the chur-will be underwrite the church et for the year. The ating budget e00ght thousa00 do00m. N'lome Town Urged: Members Chamption Home Contest are urged to ule a full proorsm of during the remainder sunvn and the earty General Chairman Hipp..." A "l"er me =end to Herald' Votir vey still offered optx)n, "none of how I vote."