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Manchester, Georgia
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July 27, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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July 27, 2000
 

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OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGhNSVUJJ HOME NEWS- JULY 27, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A rims tuhlkan Millard B. Gdmes, President PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KtaraWDAU 6LSSOCIATE PUBLISHERDITOR BRYAN GE'rER ASSOCIATE EDITOR JAYNE GOWN BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Let Women Wear the Ties I saw a woman on an airplane the other day who was wearing a tie. I don't think I had ever seen a woman wearing a tie before. I thought only men wore ties to make up for the fact we don't have to have babies.. The woman in the tie looked like one of those big-time busi- ness women who owns her own condo, a BMW and a fluffy cat. "Excuse me," I said to the woman. "I was just wondering why you are wearing a tie." "Why not?" the woman asked intended. Her eyes bugged out, her face turned red and the veins in her neck popped out in anger. She called me several unprintable names, a couple of which I have never heard before, leading me to believe women not only have equaled men in the ability to curse, but may have exceeded us. I thought the woman was going to have a stroke, so I sug- gested she loosen her tie. She did, and in a few minutes she seemed as calm as possible under the cir- : : to wear ties to get into restaurant. You walk ladyand shehas: ........ "You may enter, ...... ......... ..... maitre d' would day, there needs a tie." "...It is a known fact that wearing Sunshine Laws meback, cumstances. M, to Ely "Well," I said, "I thought only Upon some quiet reflection a tie eventua men wore ties." regarding this incident, I cameto leans "You obviously are one of the conclusion that women cer- What's Covered those Neanderthal redneck men tainly have a right to wear a tie /,SS." who think women have no place anywhere at anytime.- in your world," said the woman, In fact, I think it is only fair who was very irritated by my that all women be made to wear It appears some of our local governmental bodies have been violating the Sunshine laws. While it is probably not inten- tional, it could have some serious repercussions. In recent weeks, while speak- ing with some of the writers for our newspapers about stories from meetings, I realized that some of the boards have been vio- lating the Sunshine laws. The purpose of this column is to inform the boards of the Sunshine laws so there will be no more misunderstandings or mis- interpretations. ' Last week, one of our boards held a meeting but did not inform the media about the meeting. Luckily, one of our reporters found out about the meeting and did attend. However, he only found out a few minutes before the meeting was scheduled to begin. The legality of this meeting could have been challenged by the newspaper had management chose to do SO.' "  : ;.,: The. Sunshine. law is very explicit about legal and illegal meetings. It reads as follows: "Governing boards and agen- cies are required to post infor- mation as to the time, place and dates of regular meetings. If a meeting is to be held at other places or times, the agency must provide 24 hours advance notice both by posting notification at least as large as the legal organ or the newspaper with a circula- tion at least as large as the legal organ and to any media that requests it in writing. The notice must be given by telephone or facsimile at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting." IN OTHER WORDS, a gov- erning body must notify the legal organ at least 24 hours in advance of any special called meeting or a meeting change. Without this being done, the newspaper could challenge the legality of the meet- ing. If the meeting is determined to be held illegally, all action would become null and void. There also appears to be some confusion by some of the local governing bodies as to when they can and can't go into executive session or closed meeting. The laws governing this is pretty sim- ple as well, they are as follows: "A governmental agency is not required to close any meet- ing; however, it may vote in pub- lic to close a meeting to: inspection of physical facilities under its jurisdiction. Discuss future acquisition of real estate. However, notice that such a meeting is taking place must be given and minutes taken. When the deal is either completed or abandoned, those minutes must be disclosed. Privileged consultations with an attorney regarding pend- hag or potential legal action or claims. However, a meeting with an attorney to discuss the legali- ty of closing a meeting must be open. . ::  .: '; Discuss employment, peri- odic evaluations or disciplinary actions regarding a public offi- cer or employee. However, the presentation of evidence or argu- ment in disciplinary cases must be open. And any action taken must occur at an open meeting." comment. "Not at all, madam," I inter- rupted. "I certainly believe if a woman can do the same job as a man, she deserves the opportuni: ty to do so and she should get the same pay as a man. "The only thing I'm against women doing is voting and driving," I went on, in jest, of course. I FORGOT, HOWEVER, that the feminist movement is totally devoid of a sense of humor. I should have known the woman wouldn't take my little barb in the frivolous spirit in which it was ties and men be allowed to stop the silly practice. I quit wearing ties anywhere except to funerals of close friends several years ago when I decid- ed I had had enough of being uncomfortable. But I'm lucky. I don't have a real job like most men, so I can get away with not wearing a tie. TIES ARE detrimental to men's health. Men who have to wear ties all the time tend to be high-strung and nervous because they've got this piece of cloth tied tightly around their necks. It's ties, not cholesterol, that cause most heart attacks and strokes. Also, besides being terribly uncomfortable and unhealthy, it is a known fact that wearing a tie eventually leads to baldness. The tie hinders the circulation to the scalp and that's why men's hair falls out. :- You don't see many bald-head- ed women, do you? Of course not. That's because they don't wear ties. But it's high time they did. And it's high time men were relieved of this burden. Imagine if the tie tables were turned and it was women who had THE LARGEST confusion seems to come with what war- rants an executive session or closed meeting. The law only allows closed session for acqui- sition of real estate. That means purchasing real estate, not the disposal of properties. Note the words "pending or potential legal action." That means just what it says, the threat or a actual law- suit. These appear to be the two areas which'create the most con- fusion. Open and closed records appear to be confusing for some agencies as well. Court records, accident and police reports and minutes or governmental meet- ings are all considered open records. If a member of the media requests those records they are suppose to be givem However, the agency can ask for a request in writing. I HOPE this clarifies some of these laws. If any agency would like a copy of these Sunshine laws, this newspaper will be happy to provide a copy. Simply write us or call us and a copy will be pro- vided. BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LEWIS GRIZZARD UP IN NEARBY AND BECAME THE WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS GRIZZARD ALL AMERICA BUT TICULARLY THIS AREA OF WHICH HE WROTE AND WHERE A 85 FROM HOGANSVILLE IS HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD MUSEUM ESTABLISHED IN IN 1996, EDITING LAB IS ICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED OF BOOKS AND TAPES AR AVAILABLE FOR THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. 191266, ATLANTA GA STORES NATIONWIDI. The First FDR Birthday Balls Amid a great publicity blitz, the first Roosevelt birthday balls were held on Jan. 30, 1934. There were 6,000 of them! Roosevelt spoke on a nation- wide radio hookup, not as President so much, he said, but "more as the representativeon this occasion of the hundreds of thousands of crippled chil- dren in our country." He said Warm Springs could use "the generous gifts which are being made tonight [to] increase its usefulness nationally... We shall be able to take more people and I hope these people will be able to come to us on the recom- mendation of doctors from every state in the union... The fund to which you contribute tonight will undoubtedly permit us to extend the facilities of Warm Springs in a greater degree than before... No man ever had a finer birthday remembrance..." THE MOST PUBLICIZED of those 6,000 balls was held at the Waldorf Hotel in New York City. It was a $25-a-ticket affair. The President's 79-year old mother attended. But there were also balls and other parties where much smaller donations were made. An Associated Press story said celebrations covered a spectrum from Palm Beach society to menial workers at a state hospital for the mentally ill. There were two balls in Warm Springs, one for the townspeople at a casino, the other at Georgia Hall for the patients and staff. Children in wheelchairs went through the "steps" of a country square dance.  THE NATION seemed caught up in a crazy mood of can-you-top-this? The world"s longest telegram of congratu- lations was sent to the President from 40,000 Alabamians. A relay team of runners brought a short message to the White House from Baltimore. The final runner was a 57-year-old newspaper employee who worked the midnight-to-7 a.m. Shift, then went out in the zero- degree cold wave that was grip- ping the East that week, run- ning the 35 miles with four younger men. (Roosevelt himself celebrat- ed with a small group of old friends in the White House. The group had first come together in the 1920 vice presidential campaign, and partying togeth- er on Roosevelt's birthday was a tradition.) The money poured in. The total, after expenses of some $800,000, came to $1,016,443.59. A giant check was prepared in that amount and presented to the President for the Foundation. The question then became what to do with it. As Morgan explained later, if that money plus several hundred thousand dollars in large contributions raised by the Finance Committee in that period had been invested in 2.5% govern- ment securities, the Foundation could have been secure for the future as it had never been before. But, he went on (in a letter to a prospective large donor in 1935), the "There were two balls in Warm Springs, one for the townspeople at a casino, the other at Georgia Hall for the patients and staff." trustees felt that "would not be true to the Foundation's ideals and its reason for exis- tence..." Thcrefore, it recom- mentted another course to Roosevelt. That course the President announced to the nation on May 9, 1934, when he accepted the check. "Let me pause here to say," Roosevelt said at the reception, "that the communications which have come to us from all parts of the country since the Birthday Ball have made it more than ever apparent that there is a shortage of properly financed orthopedic beds in many, indeed most, sections of the country. They have also indi- cated to us that as a result of the new interest built up by... a Birthday Ball, at least these institutions i greater local assistance' was already thinking next stage of the polio which raised to spend not at Springs but in local and i research ink As to the million hand, he announced money would be s ways. A $100,000 fund established "to further the mer being done in the tile paralysis... Elsewhere at Warm Springs." A$650 therance of the done at... Warm Spring said he would leave the to the trustees but there would be change of doctors and pists in Warm S communities. The quarter of a million would be used for the plant at Warm Springs. (Next week: SearCl* Polio Cure) 'THE SQUIRE OF 'THE OFWARM: TLE WHITE HOUSE. TAINS REPRINTED IN PER DURING THE pAST PROCEEDS FROI SALE ALL GO TO TI SEVELT CENTEK THE HO;AbWn,LE Hob NvS is published weekly by the Star-Mercmy Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, C 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription ras by mail: $16in Troup, Heard or Meriwethcr Cotmfies; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, C_a 30230. lrOR K$CgU, rlONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications. E O. Box 426. Manchester. Georgia 31816. : Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogausville, GA 30230. STWF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kuykcndall Associate Edilor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Staff Wrhers ....................................................................... Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ................................................................................................. Loft Camp Director of Photography ......................................................................... Michael C. Snider Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Comlxzing ................................................... Wanda Keesee, Deborah Smith, Lauren King IJgah ............................................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Roeionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager ........................................................................................ oland Foiles Pressreom .............................................................................. David Boggs and Wan-ca Hill OmcEns Pridmt .................................................................................................... Millard B. Cain Vice Pmsklmt ........................................................................................  S. Grimes mary ............................................................................................... Laura Caim Corer .............................................................................................. ga Cim Cama Lqal Om ar Asrda Sa .................................................... Jaam S. nes Why Song Can Have Such An At the beginning of the ath- letic contests of our country, some one stands to sing the national anthem. The singer belts out the words, "O say can you see, by the dawn's early light..." To a lot of Americans, that song brings chills to their spine, tears to their eyes, pride to their heart and a lump to their throat. A song that reveals must of this nation's history, spir- it and pride. But not only does the Unites States have an anthem that describers her, do does the church of the living God. Probably the most recognized hymn in the world is "Amazing Grace." The, song "Amazing Grace" ought to do for the child of God like the national anthem does for the patriotic America. There are" those when that old hymn is sung in church that their heart's swell, the tears flow, and the mind tries to image what it must have been like to stand on Calvary's hill and see the Savior shed his life's blood for a lost world. Many may not understand why a song has such an affect on people. In order to find the true meaning of grace, one simply needs to go to the Bible. In 2 Samuel 9, God's Word records an event in the life of King David that is a beautiful illustration of Grace. The synopsis of the story is simple, but the meaning is pro- found. In short David seeks out a family member from King Saul's house that he may show the grace of God. The one he finds is a lame man named Mephibosheth. This young man has been lame on his feet since he was five yars old. David sends for this man, brings him to the palace and gives him a place at the kings table. This is a wonderful illustration of grace. According to the late Dr. Harold $ightler there are four thing s in this story that relates to us the grace of God. He says first of all that grace is God loving unlovely sinners. The Bible deft- nition of grace is unmerited favor. Truly the love of God is unde- served and unearned by those of us who inhabit the earth, but God "so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son that whoso- ever believeth in him should not perish." Next in this stow, we find grace is God lifting unable sin- ners. Mephibosheth was lame and unable to get to the king, so the King brought himself. What a man could not get to God,' came to where man brought unable humans sell'. David said in Psal brought me up also out of rible pit..." God not down for fallen humanitY, picked them up. Thirdly in this stow that ing undeserving restored pertained to his All that we have is Jesus and his sacrific e cross of Calvary. Lastly ners. Mephibosheth was permanent seat at ! To those save bythe graCe The next time you word Mephibosheth.