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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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July 31, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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July 31, 2003
 

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Opinions.. & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JULY 31, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62O-O4O MmE PUBLISHFADVERT1SING D1RE(YFOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISI tER/EI)ITOR Curer CtAYBROOK ASSOCLATF EDIT( }R ROB RlCHASDSON z0LxS I STA NT EDrroR JAYNE GOLDS'rON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 8463188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Thanks for Words Of Encouragement O-o-oops ! My apologies to my readers. I had stated week before last that I would be rerunning or writing a few columns about my tenth anniversary here at this newspaper Unfortunately, last week my soft drink vs. water column appeared in the newspaper. I must admit it was my fault. You see, most of columns are written in advance and then placed in the system for use by our graphic artists to be used in the newspaper. Last week, I inadvertently placed the wrong column in the folder to be used. Sorry, but we'll return to the tenth year anniversary columns this week. This week, we are jump- hag ahead a little. I returned to Trib Publications in June 1993. Two weeks ago, I wrote my returning column, this week will be a reprint (not ha its entirety) of a column writ- ten ha late October 1993. This column was about a letter received by The Harris County Journal from a read- ei that requested it not be pinted. Here is part of that column: After spending several years away from the Harris, Meriwether and Talbot area as General Manager and Managing Editor of a daily newspaper, what has made returning home so much fun for me is being involved in what's going on ha the area again. What has made it worthwhile is the people of this area. Our newspaper received a letter the other day from a lady that I didn't know, but wish I did. She requested her letter not be printed ha the paper, but said she was glad that I had returned to the area. "It is nice to have some- one as our editor who grew up here and has lived her all his life," she wrote, "It will be an asset to have an editor who knows what is important to the people of this area. Knowing the people and our history is clearly an advan- tage." It was a nice letter and hinted that I probably knew some things about the area that I shouldn't know. She was right about that as well. I have received so many good comments since my return and a number of let- ters of support and I would like to thank everyone that has done so. The words of encouragement have made me remember something very important. This news- paper is not my paper, but your paper. Some of my weekly read- ers have written me and asked why I have not point- ed out some things about the area that could be changed or maybe need improving in my weekly column. The answer to that is simple, when I returned home and to these newspapers, I made myself and my publisher Robert Tribble a promise, that I would not write a controver- sial column for at least six months. I've kept that prom- ise. NOW BACK TO the pres- ent. In the past few years I have not written many con- troversial columns. The rea- son is simple. My weekly col- umn today appears in the entire group of newspapers owned by Star-Mercury Publications, Inc. So, in order to write controversial columns, they would have to be about something that the entire readership can relate to. That would limit the col- umn to state, national and international topics and I'll let the daily newspapers con- tinue to do that. My columns are suppose to be about things that our entire readership can enjoy. However, I have decided that occasionally, when need- ed, I will be writing an edito- rial column for the newspa- pers individually. The edito- rial will address issues in the area served by that individ- ual newspaper. My regular column will still appear each week though and it will still be written with that personal touch for our hometown folks. Our newspapers also wel- comes the opinions of our readers. If you have some- thing you would like to say, you may do so ha the form of a letter to the editor. I encour- age everyone to do write. As I said earlier, what makes this area so great and is by far our greatest resource is the people that live and raise families here. So, don't be afraid to speak up. Keep those cards and let- ters coming. TIlE HOGANSViLLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, adivision of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway,, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FOR sUIISCPJPllOrCS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASTIt: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. t STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director. .............................................................. Mike Hale Ascciate Publisher and Editor ................ : ......................................... John Kuykendall Associate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Claybrook Business Manager Jayne Goldston Assist Editor  .............................................................. Rob R chlu'dmn ? ........................................................................... Staff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geter.Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager. .................................. .: ............................. Laurie Lewis Composing ............................................................ Dcwayne Flowe, Robert Weems Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulation Manager. .............................................................. B.,u'bara Arlene Steerman Press Manager. ................................................................................ Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................... Larry Colleges, 7addie Dixon,Darnell McCauley Maikoom Distribution .............................................................................. ;David Boggs CORPORATE OFFICIqCq President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President.....: ............................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer. ....................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Count[ 'and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Sad Death of a Great Young On a cloudy day, spring's first rain approaching, they came by the hundreds to mourn the death of Steve Vann. The chapel was packed with propel who had known him, who had loved him. Who still did. Perhaps now more than ever. The hallways out- side the chapel were also crowded. Those who could- n't find standing room inside waited in silence outside. Grief is rarely loud. He was just 17, a senior at Lakeside High School ha DeKalb County. He was a quarterback on the football team. He lived in an upper middle-class neighborhood. He had a lot of friends. He had parents who gave him their time and their attention and, of course, their love. Saturday morning, some- body found him dead in a creek. "There were all sorts of rumors going around," said a classmate at the funeral. "Somebody at first said he had been stabbed. I knew that wasn't true. If Steve had an enemy, I never heard about it." THE COUNTY CORO- NER was on television trying to explain it. Steve Vann died of exposure to cold. He was found in creek water that had been below freezing the night before. The temperatures the night before were also below freezing. Evidence of drugs were found in Steve Vann's body. There was no overdose, but there were drugs. . "I don't guess anybody will really ever know what happened," said one class- mate. "He went to a party Friday night, but Steve just wasn't the type to take any- thing. He might have smoked some grass, most everybody else does; but I can't see him drinking and taking pills." "Somebody could have slipped him something," added another. "I knew him as well as anybody in school, and he knew better." THE DEATH has been ruled an accident. The most popular conjecture is Steve Vann, because of the drugs, became disoriented, wan- dered into the creek and remained there - unconscious - until the cold killed him. Something like this shouldn't happen here, I was telling myself at the funeral. Look around you, I said. This isn't the ghetto. This is sub- urbia, good life America. Steve Vann was no mind- less punk. He was an athlete. He was the second-string quarter- back, but Lakeside is a state power with a huge student body from which to draw its talent. "He had the best arm on the team," somebody said. "It hurt him that he wasn't a starter, but he threw a touch- down pass in one of the last games. He must have thrown the ball 60 yards. Steve Vann's death was drug related. There is no way to hide it. A young man standing outside the chapel, said, between puffs on a cigarette, "If this don't make you think, nothing will." I could make this a ser- mon. Parents tell your chil- dren. Teachers shout it. Drugs kill. What ia had rather do id take you to Steve's funer- al. tic lesson. The casket was blue. There were top Of it. The mother hard. The father stunned. Old people their heads. Young stared in disbelief. An organ played man sang, "Will Unbroken?" and "I the Garden Alone" Lord's Prayer". And at the end, the walked to the spoke from his heart. "If any of you trouble," he told his friends, "if any of any help, come to me. "This," on, looking at the before him, God bless him that. WITH HOME NEWS IS ( ED OLUMNS BY THE LATg ] GRgARD, WHO GREW UP tN BY MORELAND, MOST WIDELY READ wRrEER OF HIS TIME. BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STI1L PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC STORES WIDE. Is It Free Speech or Just Filthy America is a great nation, and power. America is great ..... '' Many people see the founda- because America is good, and beastiality or tion of that greatness as lying if America ever ceases to be marital sex. or in different aspects of our good, America will cease to forms of country. To hear recent pop- be great!" That is a message destructive. Porno: ular politicians speak, that that needs to once again be destroys families, greatness is in diversity, heard from our pulpits, women, defiles minds, while others find that great- America is being inundated deters the proper ness in schools technology, with a constant flow of filth ship of the husband medical advances and the from pornographic the wickedness that is sold Pornography will like. There are others still cesspools. Someone has even in our local stores and people p whofindAmerica'sgreatness made the statement, "Not bleeds through our own cable destroy people in her Declaration of since Manhattan Island was TV is not free speech but cally, it will Independence, her sold for $24.00 has so much filthy smut. Pornography is nationally, and Constitution, and her Bill of dirt been available for so lit- not a harmless past time but people spiritually. Rights. It is true that these tie money as today." a terrible cancer that is numerous perverted things set America head and These proponents of spreading throughout our zations seeking shoulders apart from the rest pornography claim free country. It is not free speech very moral fabric of of the world, but I like what speech as their right to pro- because it is harmful. To country. For instance, French writer Alexis de mote their perverted pic- those that say let people do Angeles there is the Tocqueville, after visiting tures. If our forefathers saw- their own thing and we Guyon Society whose America in 1831, said, "I what is done in the name of shouldn't interfere may I ask says, "Sex by year sought for the greatness of freespeechIhonestlybelieve a question? If a restaurant else it's too late". the United States ha her corn- they would shutter ha horror, was selling contaminated 'experts' who have modious harbors, her ample The First Amendment does meat should something be gious affiliation can be, rivers, her fertile fields, and not guarantee totally free done to stop it or should that as to the destructive boundless forests-andit was speech. For you see a person business be allowed to con- of pornography. not there. I sought4or it ha cannot slander someone with- tinue? The point is that her rich mines, her vast world out being held accountable, America has been sold a bill pornography, Dr. commerce, her public School nor can you label someone of goods telling them that Merritt quoted system, and in her institu- without being prosecuted. A pornography isn't harmful. Burke as saying, ':The tions of higher learning-and person cannot yell"fire" in a -Proverb 14:34 says, thing necessary for it was not there. I looked for crowded building, nor can "Righteousness exalteth a triumph, is for it inher democratic Congress something be falsely adver- nation: but sin is a reproach do nothing." All and her matchless tised. Even the use of cer- to any people." land we must take a Constitution and it was not tain speech can be limited if Pornography is harmful against this cancer there. Not until I went into it is proven that the speech because it is a perversion of destroying the the churches of America and insights violence. Speech is the way God intended things America. To close heard her pulpits flame with free as long as it does not to be between a husband and said in that same righteousness did I under- bring harm to another, a wife. Whether it carries the "For sex is the beautY, stand the secret of her genius May I submit to you that label of hardcore of softeore, pornography is the In the Hogansville q)ISAPPOINTMENT - "A slender paw, with a seemingly magic ball, ors as LaGrange shut out the IoGal League team, 5 to 0, in the opening district play at Rome, Ga7 CINEMA-Two John Wayne among those showing at the Royal 50 years ago this week: "Three Texas and q'rouble Along the Way.' Also playing the Royal, which changed movies 'Houdini' with Tony Curtis and featuring Car/Grant and Deborah Kerr. qN STORE -' Gallant featured ladies handbag men's suits for $12.88, men's sports for $1.16 and nylon and Bemberg for $2.99. Meanwhile, Penny Profit had kins at 11 cents per package, three Borden's ice cream for 69 cents and beef for 39 centrs per pound. WANT AD STANDOUTS: apartment, $8 per week." SUBTLE WIT: "Now that the public is dding in air-conditioned cars ing in air-conditioned air-conditioned offices..." began an that suggested "air-conditioned hats."