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Manchester, Georgia
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August 3, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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August 3, 2000
 

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THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62OO4O Millard S. Gdmes, Pmeideflt MIKE HE PUBUSHEADvE']NG DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCTE PtmUSHER/EDrrOR BRYAN GET ASSOCIATE EvrroR JA BUSINESS IvmaNAG] mere Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hoemsvi Georgia 30230 Convention Stirs Memory As I watched the GOP con- vention Monday night as it was broadcast live from the "City of Brotherly Love," childhood mem- ories floated through my mind. As a boy growing up in west- ern Meriwether County on a farm, we didn't have a color tele- vision. As a matter of fact, no one in our community did. Our TV worked sometimes and sometimes it would go on strike. - you had to "strike" it for it to work. EVERY FOUR YEARS dur- ing the Democratic Presidential Convention, my mother's great cousins, Cousin Mary Lou Trammeil and Cousin Mable TrammeU, would come to our house at night - since they just lived a mile away - to watch the convention. Mary Lou was a rich lady who owned a 800 acre plantation at White Sulphur Springs, but she didn't own a television. She said she didn't believe in them. The little pt'lte lady never married and split the time living in Washington D.C. and Meriwether County. Cousin Mary Lou taught school in D.C. Cousin Mable, her younger sister, was a short lady, yet a lit- fie heavy, with a sweet personal- ity. She never married, either. Mary Lou lived to be 102 years old and Mable was in her nineties when she passed away. They were both staunch Democrates. THEY HAD a brother we called Uncle Bill who was right the opposite. He was a Republican. He visited with our family almost daffy. They all shared an large ante- bellum house. When Mary Lou called, she let it be known it was not a social visit but a political one. It was backin the early 1960's, but I still remember John F. Kennedy being nominated. I remember Jimmy Carter in the 1970's, Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan later on. I remember Bill Clinton and Bob Dole most recently. I vote not for the party but for the man. Monday night it listened with intensity since I'm not sure which candidate I will vote for in November. Colin Powell made a great speech Monday night as he said, "it is time totmild children and g:jas." He said jails are just a temporary fix. He said ff we stop crime on our streets, it must began with US. He said we need mentors, fos- ter parents and listeners if homes are broken. "CIKldren are gifts to us - It is ALL our responsibility, " he said. He said we need to teach our children to give back- let them be a part of the solution." He said George W. Bush wants quality education for all children. "We can't leave any child behind." IN TWO WEEKS, I'll watch the Democratic Conventioa Hopefully, then I can make a decision on whom I will vote for in November. Until then I, guess John Rocker is still in the Iead! Get out and Ne00Tuesday ...It's Your Duty Tlm HOC, A'RLg Hob[z NEws is published weekly by the Sti-Mercta'y Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscfiptioa rates by mail: $16in Tmup, Hea of Mefiwether Counties; $20 a year elscwh: Prices include all sales taxes. Second chin postage paid at Hogansville. Geoa 30230. FoR call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manage, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manches, Geoq 31816. POSZMAS'T: Send address changes to R O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. S Publisher and Advertisin 8 Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor .................. : ............................................. .J Kuykendall Associate Editor ................................................................................................. .Bryan Gctr Assistant Editor ....................................... : .................................................. .Rob Richardson Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldsn Staff Writers ...................................................................... .Michael C. Snida-, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ...................................................................... .Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ................................................................................................  Camp of Photogmy ........................................................................ .Michael C. Snide* Assistant Editor ..........................................................................................  Richards Composing ................................................... Wmda  Vcbomh Sm Lmrm rang Legals ............................................................................................................ Jaym Gol&ton Receptionist and Classifieds .................................................. . ......................... Cl Young Pmducm Mn ........................................................................................ Zmd res ......... .................................................................... Dmdd Boggs md Wmmm Hill Com, ct Ommm Presider .................................................................................................. A4illffid B. Csin Vice President ........................................................................................ Chmtotte S. Grimes Secretary .......................................................................................... Lmm Odmm C.d Treasurer ................................................................................ _....Ahy Cmm L Coumd md Ammm Sec ................................................... S. C. OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - AUG. 3, 2000 Prayers Helped Me @ (Written in mki-1993) While I was recuperating from my most recent operation, it wasn't always pleasant being around me. I wasn't always nice to Dedra. Or Jordan. Or Steve. Or James. Or Catfish. "Depression is normal," they told Dedra. Didn't make it any easier. I need to get her a T-shirt that says, "I survived Lewis Grizzard's third heart surgery." Survival. There is that word again. How did I manage it? It was the skill of the doctors, of course. It was the skill and the great care of all the medical per- sonnel involved in my case. It had to do with the wonderful technol- ogy of today. Oh, the magic they can weave in medicine. THEY RAISED me back from near-dead. I was a gone goose. My heart wouldn't beat, for crying out loud. I had thirty hours' worth of operations in thirty-six. The only way I stayed alive after that was because somebody once invented the heart-lung machine. And when I had come off that thing, Dr. Mark Connelly of the transplant team at Emory sug- gested those roller pumps, and I held on with those somehow. I nearly bled to death what was it, three times? There were those experimental drugs again. Because I was out of it the whole time, I would have given all the credit to the doctors ff nobody had told me any differ- ently after the crisis. They came to my bedside and said things I never thought I would hear such people of science say. One said, "A higher power was looking after you. I still don't know how you made it." Another said, "I now believe in miracles." ...... Dr. Randolph Martin said, "My friend, if you don't believe in the power of prayer now, you never will. I certainly do." OF COURSE I remembered then. In the last column before I entered Emory, I had asked read- ers to pray for me. But does anybody take any- thing like that seriously in 1993? They do. Yes, indeed, they do. They said they'd never seen anything like it at Emory. The switchboard, they told me, never stopped raging during my most critical times. And the messages were always the same: "Tell Lewis we,re praying for hire." My newspaper syndicate, the Atlanta papers, and the hospital received fifty thousand pieces of mail. "Get well," the cards said. 'Tee're praying for you." When the news broke that I was on the transplant list, some- body said the hospital got a call from a convent in Kentucky. A nun was dying of a brain tumor. The sisters offered me the dying nun's heart. A man is said to have called and offered his own heart. "I don,t have anything left to live for," he is said to have said. "Maybe Lewis does." Every day I have been out in public since my surgery, some body has come up to me and said something like "Glad to see you're doing better. My Sunday school class really prayed hard for you." A man wrote, "My prayer group met at my house, and we did nothing for two hours but pray for you." That has not stopped since I was out of the hospital. OVER AT LAKE Oconee, I was having dinner at a local restaurant. An older man came ................. ::iiii00i00iii00!!!iiiiiiii!i!ii!ili00i!!!i!i0000i!! to my table, took my hand, and said, "Young man, we're sure glad you're still with us. My wife and I never gave up on you or stopped praying for you. As long as there is somebody to pray, there is a chance that things will work out. Don't ever forget that." There were tears in the old man's eyes as he walked away from me. There were tears in mine, too. An entire family drove all the way from Louisiana to be at Emory to pray for me. Reverend Gilbert Steadham, whom I asked Dedra to get to pray at my funeral, was with me and the family at Emory. I know he must have kept the prayer lines busy. I even heard tzat former Atlanta mayor,Andy-'-oung said he prayed for me. And I try not to be very nice to politicians in my column. Once I became aware Of the efforts and the prayers of all who were involved, I began to wonder "how on earth will I ever let there people know how much I appre- ciate it? They had to have had something to do with the fact that I was still alive. Too many med- ical folk had said it wasn't all their work. First, I am trying to answer each card, each letter, with a sim- ple "Thank you." Second, I decided I would try to get a permit to hold a large meeting in the parking lot at Atlanta Stadium. What I was going to do was invite everybody who prayed forme to Colile. Then, one by one, I was their blessed necks  "From the very heart, I want you to n't have made it without' I couldn't get a Politicians. SO, what I did write my first a thank you note. I people read it I feel. better here: For be asked this question: are you feeling And it's an I just say, "Loved. feeling loved." BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE CARRYING COLUMNS BY LEWIS GRIZZARD UP IN NEARBY AND BECAME THE WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS GRIZZARD ALL AMERICA BUT TICULARLY THIS AREA OF WHICH AND 85 FROM HOGANSVILLE IS HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD MUSEUM IN 1996, AND EDITING LAB IS ICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED OF BOOKS AVAILABLE FOR THROUGH BAD 191266, Road To Polio Vaccine Diffic The first Birthday Ball was so successful that President RooseveR decided to "donate" his birthday to the cause every year. The following November, at morn- ing press conference in the Little White House, Roosevelt explained the decision. It was very informal, as usual. "Drape yourselves around," he began. "Sit on the sofa, Russell [Young, a reporter]. Fred [Storm, another reporter] does not have to sit down today... Well, I asked the Trustees [of the Foundation] to come here today because we have been working on this thing for a couple of weeks now, on the subject of a Birthday Ball... Henry L. Doherty suggested another Birthday Ball and we put it up to the Trustees and the Trustees made a recommendationL" That recommendation, in a let- ter to Roosevelt, which he read to the reporters, was for another ball in 1935, but this time the money would not be for Warm Springs. About 70% of it, he read, would be used to provide care and treat- ment in the community where it was raised, and 30% would be used for medical research to develop prevention and immunization for polio. Then he read a letter from him to Doherty saying he agreed. ROOSEVELT TOLD reporters off the record: "I think this will be a great thing because it means that a great many communities - and this is not for quotes at all - have no facilities, and now will be able to start their own." The January celebrations that followed in 1935, 1936, and 1937 were similar to the 1934 effort, but they had less than the desired results. Not as much money was raised in any year as had been in 1934. O'Connor and other suspect- ed this was partly due to Roosevelt's increasing unpopular- ity with the well-to-do who could afford the larger donations and the higher priced bails. SOME OTHERS seemed to feel that the polio fight was too partisan. They lumped together the President, the President's Commission and Warm Springs. An even less desirable result of the new effort was that a research project seeking a vaccine pro- duced one that was not only inef- fective for thatpurpose, but result- ed in a death; then another effort produced six deaths. The problem, as the scientists who later Produced successful vaccines saw it, was that the effort was not focused, as it should have "..But this time the money would not be for Warm Springs." been, on basic research into a way to prevent it. There were some successes, but the consensus view on the research done for the Birthday Balls Commission was that it was "a minus", as Dr. Thomas M. Rivers, the great virol- ogist and advisor to the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis later put it. (Of course, the money and the research eventually led to the Salk vaccine, and a of polio.) THE FOUNDATION was the 1937 emphasized of that include Warm S "among man fairness to m bilities, I cannot at a very active part in the broader work that will be out by hold any official Basil O'Connor dent. (Next week: Better raise money.) rHE SQUIRE OF qI  OFWARM: AT THE GIFT SHOF TAINS ALL REPRINTED IN PER DURING THE PROCEEDS FROM TH  SALE ALL GO TO SEVELT CENTER. Following Directions: It Makes S There have been countless times parents, especially dada, have struggled with the assem- bly of a child's new toy. On Christmas Eve many a frustrat- ing night has been spend trying to determine which piece goes where and with what fastener. Then, after a couple of hours of little success, the frustrated father picks up the instructions to see what themanufacturer has to say. Finally after following the directions, the toy is complete. Not following the directions in the assembly of a toy may not have serious consequences, but not following the directions in the training of a child can and will be disastrous. If it is wise to consult the man- ufacturer in the assembly of a toy, would it not be just as wise to con- stilt the manufacturer of our chil- dren? The other night my son Jason and I were invited by another fel- low to go see the Atlanta Braves play. We all had an enjoyable time and even experiences something that very few in the state of Georgia have experienced this summer, rain. As we waited for the rain to stop and play to resume, I noticed something disturbing. The young people that were there simply ran loose without any supervision at all. The behav- ior of one particular group caught my attention. Their behavior wasn't such to cause the field officials to eject them from the stadium, but their behavior was such that some par- ent ought to have taken action. But, no parents were to be found. Many times we hear after a child has gotten into serious trouble, "Where did I go wrong?" My ques- tion is, "Did you follow the direc- tions?" There are young people today who have come under serious attack. This attack has been lev- eled because of teen smoking, teen alcohol and drug abuse, teen sexual misconduct and of other things. actions are blame is not all to the young people. The responsibility instruction and dren lies with the cially the father. in Epheslans 6:4, "And, provoke not your wrath: but brin nurture and Lord," If we are change in the nations youth, directions. But as parents who care for the heritage blessed us with, let us up by following the God has given us.