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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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August 6, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
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August 6, 2004
 

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Opinions &" Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usps 620.o4o A ~rim~ ]~li~at~ B. G~, Pre=fldent JOHN KUYKENDALL PUBLIS~ITOR ADVERTISING DIRECTOR CUNT CLAYSROOK ASSOCIATE EDrrOR ]RoB RICH~SON ASSISTANT EDn~OR Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansvflle. Georgia 30230 A Glimpse at Prep And College Football It's almost football season again. The scrimmage high school games will begin in about two weeks and all the men here at the newspaper office are all getting really excited about it, as wet[ they should be. This is go'rag to be an exciting high school and college season. I've been trying to sneak a peak at the area high school" teams and my college favorites in an attempt to :determine where every team will be at season end. While we all know that opinions aren't worth much. I'm going to share my opin- ions with you about some of the teams. Starting with the Manchester High Blue Devils. Manchester has found themselves, ff you will. The Blue Devils have some pret- ty hard hitters on this year's squad and should prove to be a pretty good defensive team. They also have the offensive tools to move the football. The coaching staff is solid and think quick on their feet. I look for the Blue Devils to return to the days of glory this season. Look for the Blue Devils to make it to region playoffs and maybe even the state. Harris County High might just have a couple of tricks up their sleeves this season. While they are having to rebuild some on offense and defense, they are pretty solid up front and some tough run- ners in the backfield. ~ One thing that will help the Tigers is the coaching staff. Tommy Parks is work- ing to build a winning attitude at the school. The Tigers have their best shot in recent years to make the region playoffs. They should be good enough to fin- ish fourth in the region, but only time will tell. The Greenville High Patriots are rebuilding this season and will have a tough reed ahead. However, thegflo have an excellent head coach in Jeremy Williams and he wi~ Callaway High lost a few players last season, but the ~ Cavaliers got really good play from some of the younger players last season. While the Cavaliers might struggle against some teams, they have the potential to fin- ish in the top four in the region. Only time will tell for CMlaway, but expect them to win their share of football games this season. Central High showed some improvement last sea- son and are expected to be bet- ter this year. The Hawks have some talent, but mostly they have a lot of speed. The b~aches are banking on that speed to help the Hawks improve. There expec- tations will be right, While Central probably won't make the playoffs, they will finish the season with the best record ins few years. AS FOR the SEC, it's pret- ty cut and dried as far as I'm concerned. The Georgia Bulldogs and the LSU Tigers should, with- out some unforeseen tragedy, make it back to the SEC title game. That doesn't mean that they fall to some of the pred- ators out there. Look for Florida, Tennessee, Alabama and Auburn to have a say in just where Georgia and I~U end up at the end of the sea- son. Alabama wil} have a pret- ty good team this season and so will Auburn. They could be the sleepers that creep up on LSU. Georgia needs to pay close attention to Florida as well. The Gators are a better team and won't go down without a fight. whip the Patriots into shape ', Look for Georgia Tech to quickly. "\surprise some people this sea- The Patriots should have bon. Tech has built a pretty a winning season this year, but good offensive unit and will returning to the playoffs could be a stretch for them. FLINT RIVER ACADEMY is rough and ready. The Wildcats have a few weak spots, but not w/any. The Wildcats won't make many mistakes and will get after their opponents as they have always done. Look for the Wildcats to return to the playoffs again this season. be able to move the football. Defensively, they will attack the football. Tech has a chance this season to show they can win consistently. So, there you have it. My opinion of how the area high school and college teams will perform this season. Of course, don't bet your moneyonmy opinion, because I can be wrong. Of course, I could be right. Only time will tell. THE HOCASSVlLL~ HOME NEwS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, adivision of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roos~'lt Highway. Manchester, Gccagia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $24 a,year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansviile, Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FOR sa.msom,rlo~ call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426. Manchester, Georgia 31816. ~: Send address cNmges to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Editor ........ . ............................ , .................................... John Kukyendall Advertising Direct~ .................................................................................. Laurie Lewis AssocLate Editor .................................................................................. Clim Claybrook Assistant Edito ..................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff Writers....: .................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Composition .............................. Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems, Gaff Youngblood Circulation Manager.... ........................................................................ Tracy Lynn Wyatt Press Manager ................................................. 2 ............................... Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................................... Zaddie Dixon, Darnell McCa#ey Mailroom Distribution ............................................................................... David Boggs Com~aAlx Omc~a~s President ......................................................................... . ................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ................................. : ................................................ Ch',wlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grim~ Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Grimes PAGE 4-A - HOGANSVILLE HOME - THURSDAY, AUG. 5, 2004 Always Had a Way With Although I remained steadfast in my Methodist learnings, I spent a great deal of time at the Baptist church in my teen years. I always made it to their summer revivals, and often I would drop in at their Baptist training Union (BTU) meetings on the way home from Methodist Youth Fellowship (MYF), in case I still had a taste for refresh- ments. I also attended Vacation Bible School at both church- es, thereby providing myself with now one, but two weeks of free soft drinks and cook- ies, as well as further oppor- tunities to socialize with my friends. My best friend, Danny Thompson, was a Baptist, as a matter of fact, and we were inseparable in those days. Danny could run much faster than I could, but I knew the capitals of every state in the union, and so after he would thrash me in an afternoon of footracing, we would sit down under a large tree in his yard, and I would amaze him with my ability to give a capital for every state hecould name, including Montpelier for Vermont and Pierre for South Dakota. DANNY AND I were sit- ting next to each other at Baptist Bible School the first time I ever saw Paula. It was the summer between our fifth and sixth grade years. We were still only barely toler- ant of girls in those days, and when this tall, gangly child walked into our Bible School class, Danny asked me, "Who is that?" "Never seen her before in my life," I replied. "I wonder if she's going to be in our class?" Danny continued. "I hope not," I answered him. "She looks like she's been sick a lot to me." : THE TRUTH of the mat- ter was that she - Paula - was simply in that growth stage in which little girls suddenly sprout long arms and legs, and take a shape roughly akin to those tall Africans you occasionally see on televi- sion, who can high jump over a thatch hut by getting a run- aing start and then leaping off huge ant mounds. When she walked, she moved with a sort of forward tilt, as if she were fighting a strong headwind. She also had a long nose and a weird sort of hair style that likely had come from a Toni home permanent box~ She did, in fact, enter the sixth grade with us, and that is when I noticed a couple of other things about her that disturbed me. One, she talked entirely too much, and two, she was left-handed, and when she wrote, she hooked her hand around and sort of drug the pencil backwards. THE FIRST WORD I ever said to her were, "Where did you learn to write like that?" "What's wrong with the way I write?" was her response. A Big Generation Gap I Now Now that many of us are approaching what many call "our golden years," have you ever wondered what the younger generation thinks about our age group? Do our grandchildren look at us and consider us as part of a great "generation gap" as we once thought of our grandpar- ents? Somehow it seems hard for us to accept the fact this gap still exists, but closer examination reveals L~ap is still there, A conversation with your children, and even more likely with your grand- children, will let you know mighty quick, you don't always find your thinking on the same page with them. My mother grew up in Jackson County, nine miles from the nearest paved road. I was privileged to spend many summers at "the old home place" with my cousins. Boy did we have a good time. I have heard my uncle ask my aunt after he came home at sundown from a day's work in the field, "Alma, who was that who passed by about 4:30 this afternoon?" He expected an answer and she most always had an answer for him. It would be after World War II before this area would have electricity, running water, inside plumbing and paved roads. In rural Clarke County, where we lived, we had these conveniences and a nine-month public school much earlier than our cousins dicL ..... I can remember our grandfather telling us to "blow out the lamp" before you go to bed, referring to our electric switch. I WOULD listen intently as our grandfather would talk about older times. I thought he lived a great life as he talked. He would tell me about the shortage of salt due to the union blockade during the Civil War. He would talk about dig- ging the dirt in the smoke house where salt had dripped to the ground from the hams and other pork. He and his older brother would take this cHrt and ddd:~6ffll Wa" t~i- in the wash pot and boil it. They would retrieve this water and save for cooking the fam- ily food for a salty flavor. While our great-grandfa- ther was away fighting the enemy, our great grand- mother and s~lings too young to go off and fight were left to keep up the home front. When remnants of Sherman's infamous "March to the Sea" came through Jackson County everything of value as mules, horses, chickens and hams were hid- den from the renegade I happened to the top of my class in manship and subject. "You slant wrong way," I "Plus, the hand around the of lineandl pencil looks stupid." "Well," she "you have freckles all your face and overlap, I please." I've always had a with women. ...to be continued next BY SPECIAL WITH HIS DEDRA, El) COLUMN.' BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF I PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND BOOK AND MUSIC STORE2 WlD~ Yankee invaders. would call this Thieving Yankees. Once our family got word were en route to the Jackson County. Grandpa was a young and an early teen were assigned to take stock to the big pasture! hide them from the GRANDPA would back tO the housc~ry where ! them food in a lard and he would fill his with hoe cake. Our would get big as saucers Grandpa would tell slipping through the his brother ] ily stock. Those seemed be exciting days to us.- We no longer have about the Civil War include stories such as ging dirt in the house for salt, but sation with your dren will reveal a world never knew existed. 50 Years Ago.,. Intl Hogansville Herald Predeeeu~toele Ho~mm~b Home Net~ READY FOR SCHOOL -A front page story in the Aug. 5, 1954 Hogansville Hera/d told of the expected arrival of H.S.iChaffin of Guin, AL, who would be the the new principal of Hogansville Elementary. Apparently, educators salaries were quite modast even back then: it mentioned he and his wife and two children would be living in an apartment in someone else's house. QUICK REFLEXES - Hogansville folks were invit- el, for a price, to come fish all they wanted at Lake Bennett, a 125-acre lake that was being drained fot the first lime since 1925. =Everyone present can catctl all the fish they cen ~dl hook or bare/~r~s." MODERN MARVELS -It was even more of challenge to deal with August heat in 1954 today. The Hogansville Economy Auto ad offered a complex-lootdng "Penguin car cooler" that a clown hom for $14.95 ffor cool, i ng regardless of the weather."- In addition to inch Zero fan for $4.95, the store also had an Eskimo Ice Cream Freezer with the rather dubious claim, ~i~ and junior will/ore to turn the handle of this easy- operating freezer with the thought of delicious ice cream on their minds." d-lAVE YOU SEEN HIM YET? There was not one but two front page stories about the ardval of German exchange student Hans Scheel, under auspices of the Kiwanis Club. He "spoke briefly, his deep appr~K~tion to the dub members for his in being in ~lle and for tt'~ wonderful way lhey have been treating him." Less lhan a decade before, the U.S. had been at war with Germany. WANT AD WONDERS - "I Have quite a lot of full grown large crickets for sale at the pool room..." ,,SHOW TIME - Movies playing m the Royal Theatre included 'Johnny Guitar,' 'Fireman, Save My Child,' 'Forbidden,' 'Woman of the North Country,' 'F~/e' and 'How to Marry a Millionaire.'