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Manchester, Georgia
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August 7, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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August 7, 2003
 

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OF THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 R (rins hblkation Millard B. Grimes, President 1VJ[w HAU I>LIB LISHER/ADVERTISI NG DIRECTOR JOHN KtmKENDALL ASSOCIATE IBLISHER/EDITOR CLINT CLAY]BROOK ASSOCIATE EDITOR ROB IICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE C_-rON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188 Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansvflle, Georgia 30230 It's Pigskin Time! Well, it's almost that time once again. Time for the Friday night heroes to put on their battle gear and take to the grid iron. Yep, it's high school football time! This year should prove to an interesting one for our local high schools. There are lots of changes from last season and a great deal of anticipation for the fans. A number of ladies read my column each week, but this week might be an exception. Sorry ladies, but this week's topic,s one that has tobe talked about. Let's talk football, guys. Area high schools have seen a number of changes since last season and those changes are going to produce a football season that, for the lack of a better word, will be an interesting one. I'm going to give my read- ers a little heads up and some expectations for the upcom- ing season about each of the high schools in our coverage area. LET'S START WITH Callaway High. While Callaway High has seen some coaching changes and some player changes for the upcom- ing season, expect a pretty solid football team to take to the field the last Friday night of August. Callaway show- cased some pretty good offen- sive talent last season and this year won't be any different. The Cavaliers will have a good running game and a pretty fair passing game. With wide receivers like the son of Rep. Carl Von Epps, expect the Cavaliers to a quick hitting offensive team. Don't get suck- ered by the offense though. The defense is hard-hitting, fast to react, and willchallenge an offense. Look for the CAVS to be right in the thick of the playoff picture. AS FOR MANCHESTER High, fans will see something a little different this season. Mainly, a Greg Oglesby team that will put the football in the air. Oglesby has returned as head coach of the Blue Devils. He is respected and expecta- tions by the fans are high, and rightfully so after Oglesby led the team to a state champi- onship a few years ago. The Blue Devils are young and in a rebuilding year and many fans don't expect them to be as good as in years past. Well, forget it. While Manchester is young, they are talented. The Blue Devils will have a run- ning game with Armad Hodo, but they will also have a good passing game. Ogelsby has also brought back the bend, but don't break mentally for the defense. So, Blue Devil fans.., don't count them out as of yet. You might be pleasant- ly surprised. AS FOR THE HARRIS County Tigers, it's quite pos- sibly playoff time. The Tigers have not one, but two good quarterbacks. That's right, two and both good ones. Kiven Hamler will return this sea- son, and Kyle Harrison, who did not play last season, give the Tigers two choices. The Tigers have a pretty good ground game, and with the passing threat, can be danger- ous offensively. On the defen- sive side of the football, Coach Tommy Parks has introduced the Tigers to the "never quit, never give up, and never die" defensively style of play. Look for the Tigers to surprise some folks this season, and look for them in the playoffs. THE GREENVIIA Patriots won't be the same team this season. This is the second season for PAT Head Coach Jeremy Williams. With a good combination like Tanner Glisson and Chip Medders joining him on the sidelines, the coaching staff provides experience and vision. Williams and his team have brought a new attitude to the PATS and they will be a better team than in recent years. Look for the PATS to be a solid football team this sea- son and most definitely a team to be watched. CENTRAL OF Talbotton has seen changes since last season as well. There are new coaches, a new attitude and a number of new faces on the team. The Hawks are not one of the most experienced teams, but one of the most motivated rit}ht now. The Hawks have something to prove and are capable. The Hawks will be an improved football team. THAT JUST LF, AVES Georgia and Georgia Tech. What can you say? Mark Richt and the Bulldogs are strong once again and will be a con- tender. Georgia Tech, while not back to the old glory days, will be in the thick of things. It's going to be an exciting and ful-filled football season. So get ready, and make plans to be there on Friday nights, cheering on our hometown heroes. THE HOGANSVlLLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway. Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Tmup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid' at Hogansville, Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FOR suascRnrrtoNs call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director. .............................................................. Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ......................................................... .John Kuykendall Associate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Claybrook Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ..................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff Writers.... ..................................................................... Bryan Geter,Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Comlx)sing ............................................................ Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems Le-als ................................................... Jayne Goldston . t V".'n'M,,m'aier ........................... BarbaraArlene Steerman urculau " g ............................................................... Press Manager. ................................................................................ Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................... Larry Colleges. Zaddie Dixon,Damell McCanley Mailmom Distribution ............................................................................... David Boggs CORPORATE OWtCERS President .................. : .......................................................................... Millard B, Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. C 'harloue S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .............................................. dames S. Grimes ,inions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - AUG. 7, 2003 Humor Was Grizzard Family From Lewis Grizzard's collection "It Wasn't Easy, But I Sure Had Pn The last of a special breed of folk is dead. There were 12 of them born to my pater- nal grandparents, Mama and Daddy Grizzard, of rural Gwinnett County, Georgia. My father was the youngest. He's been gone 20 years. Aunt Nell was the old- est. She's been gone a long time, too. Three of my late uncles were unforgettable charac- ters. Walt and Wesley Grizzard were in the used car business. They had Grizzard Motors, and they were wily veterans of the trade. They were both big men with big voices, and very few cus- tomers escaped unsold when they stepped onto the lot. %Ve're the walking man's best friend," my Uncle Wesley used to say. MY UNCLE FRANK was a lawyer. My father took me to see him perform in the courtroom once.'I was maybe 12. Uncle Frank was defend- ing a man on a charge of mak- ing moonshine. As he addressed the jury, a woman seated behind the defendant broke into hyster- ical tears. Uncle Frank went into his client's military history, pleading with the jury to real- ize he had "fought on the bald hills of Korea." And the woman sobbed. It took 10 minutes for the jury to render a verdict of innocent. As we walked out of the courtroom, my father said to Uncle Frank, "That sure was pitiful about the man's wife." "Wife?" Uncle Frank asked back. 'VChat wife?" "Your client's wife," said my father. "It sure was piti- ful the way she cried." "That wasn't his wife," said Uncle Frank. "She was just an old girl I paid $50 to come here and squall." THE LAST OF THE 12 was my Aunt Rufie. She died last week in suburban Atlanta. She was 84. She and my fther were close. My parents divorced when I was six, and when I would visit my father in Atlanta, we would usually wind up at Aunt Rufie's house. Daddy would play her piano and sing. I loved that house because of the laugh- ter that was always in it. When my father fell on hard times during the last 10 years of his life, it was my Aunt Rufie who stood by him the strongest. "I could never turn my back on my baby brother," she often said to me when we talked of him after his death. I'm going to be a pall- bearer at Aunt Rufie's funer- al. I will see some cousins I haven't seen in years. Death brings survivors together, regardless of how far they might have drifted apart. The Grizzard men women, my uncles meant a lot to a child. I lived er and didn't see them t often, but when I did, it! always a grand The legacy they lef was the love of humor. wasn't a one of them I'm still stealing a great of their material. A man came up to I few years ago at a publict ering your dad and sisters. When down in Gwinnett they'd send for a just to That's my couldn't be BY SPECIAL WITH HIS HOME NEW,  ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE 1 GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN | BY MORELAND, MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS TIME. BooKS AND TAPES ARE STILLt PIUCTIONS, P.O. BOX AA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC STORES WIDE. The Importance of Spiritual It seems now more than ever before our society is becoming health conscious. With the emergence of health food stores, gyms, diet plans and the keen awareness of disease, many are trying to get the physical body in shape. There are many different motivations for wanting to "get in shape." Some want to because they feel bad, because they do not like the way they look, becaus their doctor told them to, or sim- ply because because they want to. These motives are fine, but for the Christian, there are two motives that should superceede all other motives.. 1 Cor. 6:19-20 says, "What? Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own? [20] For ye are brought with a price: there- fore glorify Godin your body, and in your spirit, which are God's." The Christians first motive for taking care of their body is because it is not their own. When a person gets saved, the Bible tells us that the Holy Spirit comes to reside in that person's life, Their body then becomes the temple of the Holy Spirit. The second motive for taking care of ourselves is that in our body we are to glorify God. THE 'LIFE a Christian fives in their body is to bring honor and glory to God. 1 Cor. 10:31 saya, "Whether there- fore ye eat, or drink or what- soever ye do, do all to the glory of God." No matterwhat the Christian does in the phys- ical body, it should bring honor and glory to God. We should take care of our bodies as best we can; how- ever, there is another verse of Scripture that must be con- sidered. 1 Tim. 4:8, "For bod- ily exercise profiteth little: but godliness is profitable "Even more impor- tant than our own physiC: :'tvell. being, is our spiri- tual well being." unto all things, having prom- ise of the life that now is. And of that which is to come." According to this verse even more important than our own physical well-being, is our spiritual well being. ' Of course all those who are working hard to ensure their physical health many are working hard to ensure their al health? The before a person gets they are "dead in and sin." When a person repents and places their faith in, as Savior, that person 1 again. life, eternal life, to son. Just a, baby grows, born {hrisan Peter 2:2 says babes, o the word, that ye thereby:" If this going to have strong es and if Christians are i to be effectively used they must grow in the of God. While there is an given to the health of temples made of be not forgotten that a spiritual side of ma must be looked after, as 50 Yea00 In the Hogansville Prtoth CHOP THOSE PINES - The story on the front of the Aug. 6, 1 Hogansville Herald extolled virtues of pulpwood. At that time than 30 freight carloads per were & West Point Railroad." *HOT TUNES-Rankings on 'Hillbilly Hit Parade' had 'Mexican, by J Reeves at number 1, These( Williams at number 2, and Cheatin' Heart' by Hank third place. -CINEMA- Some epics were playing this RoyalTheatre of Lost Men' with Allen ,y' 'The Girl Who Had Ev( 'Man in the Dark,' one of the D movies to come to .IN STORE - Market's ad contint tion not only for its prices but alsO unsettling banter. 'One Of cerymen came to see me last He didn't whip me, so I was see him," the ad noted. the Miracle Basement had ' 10 for $1, ladies sandals for and towels, five for $1. WANT ADSTANDOUTS: wallet was taken from me night on Corinth Road.." LONG BEFORE DISH NETWORK: The Auto advertised a 21-inch PhilcO for those who didn't want to for a 1 or 2 channel set."