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Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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August 8, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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August 8, 2002
 

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,.ll. Q Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVIIA HOME NEWS - AUG. 8, 2002 A 0;rim IIliratt Mtllard B. Grimes, President MI HAI PtmtZSrmR/ADnG DmrOR JOHN KAtL As,soc Ptmusrm_arroR RoB RIa4Am3SON AssrArcr EDrrOR JAYNE BusAs MANAGER Phone (706) 8463188. Fax (706) 846-2206 R O. Box426 HogansviUe, Georgia 30230 Community News Is What We Want (The following column about the role and value of week/y new was writ- ten by Joyce Beverly, pub- lisher of The News and Farmer in Louisville, Ga. ) Last year the Wall St. Journal in a front page story discussed the trends and changes taking place in news- paper circulation. The article focused on a newspaper in Dunn, N.C. that had a circulation penetration in its primary market of 112 percent, which means that the number of people who buy their newspaper out- numbers the number of homes in the area it serves. A few papers whose circula- tion exceeded 90% were also mentioned. Leslie Lambert sent me a copy of the article with a note that said, "This made me think of you." Since then, Duma, N.C.'s newspaper has been the sub- ject of intensive scrutiny by people in this industry. It has been written about, studied, profiled at national eonven- tions and the subject of innu- merable business lunches. THE NEWSPAPER'S owner believes in a basic practice of community jour- nalism: his paper represents the people he serves. His news is about them. When I read it, I thought, "Wow! Everything he's done we've either done or wanted to do...wait a minute, if we were audited we may have made this vn'ite-up..." But audits cost money I had rather spend on flower boxes and window treat- ments and anyway our adver- tisers know you read our paper' for the same reason folks in Dunn read theirs. We write about you. We take your picture. We attempt to spell your I name correctly. And we continually explore ways to do it better. We don't always get it right. We do make mistakes. We do at times offend, though that is never our objective, but I believe few would doubt that we genuinely care for the people who live in Jefferson and Glascock coun- ties. WE OBSERVE, but not from a vantage point that is so high that we are unin- volved. We are like the Enterprise-Journal, pub- lished in McComb, Miss., which on its nameplate claims to be "the one news- paper in the world interest- ed in this community." While circulation declines for most daily news- papers, sales for the 7,437 weekly newspapers in the United States reached an all- time high in the 90s, accord- hag to the Newspaper Association of America. This fact has the attention of our metro paper counterparts. Everybody who's anybody serious about a newspaper career is talking about this. Community journalism is, in a word, hot. (Edimr's note: We belle Ms. Beverly's comments on The News and Famt would alsoapplytoournetvspapen. They are in small mostly rural counties, but they are growing, and we expect this fall to reach a peak in ecel- of prinfing, sports and political coverage, and all- around excellence.) \\; \\; We welcome yodr le.00. Please mail them to: Hogansville Home News P. o. Box 426 HogansvO Georgia 3023O Please fax them to: 706-846-2206 lase be sure to include an address arM phone number (far vrification). TII: HidANSVILI.F HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Coupany. a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchcsler. Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subription rates by mail: $18 in Troup. Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. F(m suf, cmvrl( call (706) 846-3188 o write to Circulation Manager, St Mercury Publications. P. O. Box 426. Manchester, Georgia 31816. PI'iIASO;R: Send ",dd,, changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher  Edito ........................................................... John Kuykendall BuSiness Manager. ............................................................................... .Jayne Goldston Assistant Fitor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWriters .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager .................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ........................................................................................ Linda Lester Composing ................................................................. IX'wayne Flow, Valinda lvery. Circulation Manager. ................................................................................... Judy Crews Legals .......................................................................... Jayne Goidston Pressnwm Manager. ....................................................................... Wayne C_a'ochowski Presnml ........................................ David Boggs. Larry Colleges. Shannon Atkinso a'E Omcns President. ........................  ................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice Predent .................................................................................. Charloue S. Gdmes Secretary .......................................................................................... Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Gant Legal Counl and Assistant Secretary. ............................................. J S. Grimes Hamilton, Bermuda, is par- adise. The water is blue as the sky and the temperature is per- fect. Spring has colored the island with its glorious reds, pinks, yellows and whites and people sit on ocean overlooks and sip drinks made stout with rum. I should le thankful a bit of business has landed me here. I'm not, however. I usually can get along with just about everybody, even liberal Democrats and chiropractors, but I am having a difficult time dealing with Bermudians. YOU'VE HEARD about it in Jamaica, and maybe you've experienced it in the Bahamas. Add Bermuda to the list. Many of the locals, most of whom make their living off the tourist trade, have no use for tourism I'm supposed to play golf at the Mid Club. Very British. Lots of portraits of scowling men on the walls. I walked to the starter's office. "Hello," I began. "I'm sup- posed to play golf with..." "You're not playing golf in those shorts," the starter inter- rupted me. "What's wrong with my shorts?" I asked. "TOo short," saidthe starter. "Don't you tourists know any- thing?" To avoid an ugly scene, I went to the pro shop andbought shorts with the proper length. They were quite ugly and cost me 40 bucks. Back to the starter. A com- panion had joined me. 'Td like to have two carts," he said to Mr. Sunshine. "You don't tell me what you want to have," the starter snapped. "I tell you what I will allow you to have." We got even. Neither of us replaced our divots -- holes in the ground -- in which a small boy could get lost. Cab drivers. One berates our group because we try to get into his cab bearing cups. "You're not getting into my cab with those cups," he says with the distinct aroma of admonishment. "You might spill something on my seats." "Forget it, Heloise," I said. "We'll walk" WALKING in Bermuda in dangerous. They drive on the wrong side of the road for one thing, and if you are a Bermudian and you run over a tourist, you get a free ticket to th cricket matches or some other valuable preminnt The night doorman at the front of the Sonesta Beach Hotel "You don't say spits at me. "I say 'taxi"' Fm with the guy, and he have me put in the jug Bermudian for jail. He never did the charge would be. "taxi" when it I suppose. I'm leaving today. When my flight ly airborne, I am going to back and known gesture. The beauty here worth the bother. BY SPECIAL NEWS IS CARRYING coLUMNS BY THE LATE GRIZT, ARD, WHO BY MO, AND BECAMIg'. MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS TIME. BOOKS PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC WIDE. So What Do We Go to Church Several years ago, I read a story about a man and his wife who had just been to church and they were now on their way home. During the short drive home the husband and wife began to have a somewhat one-sided conver- sation and it went something like this. The wife looked over to her husband and asked if he saw who sister so and so was sitting with. The husband replied that he really didn't notice. Again, the wife leaned over and asked her husband if he noticed that the "Jones" were driving a brand new CadiUac. The husband, after just a moment of thought, answered that he did not see that either. ALMOST HOME, the wife, at the point of frustra- tion, asked another question of her husband. She asked if he paid any attention to the fact the preacher had on another brand new suit. Again, the husband answered he had not noticed. The wife, now fully frustrated and aggravated, asked in a huff, "Well, then just why did you go to church?" May we that found our- self in the house of God this past week ask the same ques- tfon: Just why did we go to the church? Sad, but true, there are many that go to church for the same reasons that the per- son in our story revealed. There are many who go just to see or to be seen. Why is it that we do go to God's house or may I ask, why should we go to church? We know that the Word of God commands every believer to be faithful to the public assembling of the saints of God (Hebrews 10:25). Our primary purpose for coming to the Lord's house is to worship our Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ. The word worship literally means to depress and it refers to lying oneself prostrate. It means to give the honor, the praise, and the glory that is due our Lord. But, many times when we attend church, we are caught up in everything except the Lord. I'M NOT necessarily speaking of things that are intrinsically evil, but good things that we have allowed to distract us from our real purpose of assembling. When a child of God enters the house of God, how can he be sure that he will properly worship the Savior? If a person would look in the 01d Testament book of Nehemiah and chapter nine, he would find three things that would help them to be focused on the Savior rather than other things. In Nehemiah, we find the city of Jerusalem in  and the man Nehemiah rebuilding the walls and repairing the gates. After just fifty-two days the walls and gates were fin- ished. Then the real work begins. The nation, having been in captivity for seventy years, needs their worship restored. Ezra the scribe comes on the scene and we find the nation of God wor- shipping again. The three things about these people with a renewed focus upon the God of Heaven are three things that will enable us to go to church for the right reason. I briefly mention things. These people no place in the house or in the life of a believer. Whena upon himself and his he will not be the Savior. Secondly, people had an action of ness. They separated selves from the them (separation does mean isolation) and fessed sin. IN of the traces of the world them. Finally, people could focus upon 1 God because they assembly of harmony. cannot focus on consumed with jealousy grudges. We cannot Jesus while focused on ers. The worship of offering of praise, glorY J reverence to Before we walk into1 doors of our church house1 next appointed time, ask ourself the question: am I here today? 50 Years Ago.., Inthe Hogansville a siege of sickness recently was carried to the hospital in hurry and needed a rare type blood for several Following her recovery and retum homo, Mrs. Gay had th say about the blood program: certainly is a wonderful thing have blood available when need it." *TROOP PROVES SOUTH BEST. COWS: How a Gaorg00 dawman-has, dairy cows produce milk as dantty in the hot South as Cool North is told in the issueof Country B. Avery Jr., who Point, in Troup County, has a of 57 highng Holsteins... A LOT OF WATER: of Hogansville has worked time to prevent becoming a reality in the and sinks all over the AQUARIAN SUP: For second week in a row, the ran a huge front page of...water. "It has been so since we had seen ish some respite..."