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August 19, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
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OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - AUGUST 19, 1999 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS MIIlard B. Gdmes, President MIKE HALE PUBIJ St tER]ADVERTIS IN G DtREC'rOR JoHn KUYKENDALL ASS(X21A'IT2 PUBIJStfER]EDITOR MARION (TED) Smm MANAGING EDITORfrECt INICAL DIRFAlX)R WmBERT BUS[NE.SS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 ttogansville, Georgia 30230 (l'cial lz'k'al Organ, Ci O, o/ Hoanm,ilh, Bows and Arrows "You are the bows from which your children, as living arrows are sent forth."- Kahlil Gibran For years, you think it will never end...you will always be tired; you will always be wrin- kled; you will never have a sin- gle minute to yourself; there will always be little ones tug- ging at your clothes. Then, one day - all of a sud- den, it so strangely seems - they're gone. All grown up, tall,. strong and complete - driving away to seek whatever life sends their way. "Where did all the time go?" you ask yourself, as the car that once seemed like such a mile- stone speeds away... "Weren't they tiny children only yester- day?" My son is a senior in high school this year. My daughter will be a senior next year. And, for the first time since before they were born, the light at the end of my child-rearing tunnel is bigger than the dark. In fact, my serious child- rearing years are about to end. I know my children are ready for their next steps; but am I? Part of having a senior in a tradition-laden place like this, is there are certain things one must do; and, a mere few weeks into it all, I've already figured out why. These obligatory sen- ior steps are designed to help us say, "Goodbye." The year book ad/picture page so many senior parents buy is a way to look back, re- live and permanently memori- alize that graduate's first 18 years. And, in gathering those pre- cious photos up, one sheds more than a few tears...the senior baby picture needed for the football program ends up being chosen the same day the sen- ior picture proofs arrive...I remember that fat baby boy so clearly - when did that tall, handsome young man take his place? In a nostalgia-driven panic, you resolve to savor and slow down - do more cooking, less working, spend more quality time - after all, by this time next year, he'll already be gone. But, even as you say those things, you know no matter what you do, too quickly time will march on, as your tomor- row become yesterdays. Trying to savior a child is like trying to catch the leaves budding out on the trs in the spring or the frost forming on your window on a cold winter night. No matter how fervently you promise yourself this time rou'll watch carefully, you shift rout attention for a moment Lorin Sinn- Clark Columnist and change sneaks up on you anyway. Suddenly the trees have leaves on them or the win- dow is covered with frost again. No matter how hard you focus on kids, they end up grown and gone too soon, anyway. I enjoy my grown-up kids. I'm proud of what they've become. I can tell they're wor- ried about me, since secure as the center of my life is the only version of my life they have known. But, I know we'll all three do.all right, once "goodbye" becomes familiar as "hello." There are a lot of tears left to shed, though, in this process of letting go. I do wish they could be lit- tle again, maybe just for one more day. I wish we could draw pictures and read stories and nap together, maybe just one time more. I wish I could smell their sweet, sweaty curls, again, just once and feel their warm, sweet, rapid breath on my face. I'd give anything to hold their plump tiny hands, again. If we could only go back in time for a minute or two, I'd be better at nearing this particu- lar finish line. My advice to the parents of little ones would never be to "savor" them at all. Instead, it would be to remember you are well blessed; the, wallow in the trenches of childhood as firmly and enthusiastically as you can. The parents I know who have the hardest time closing each door and opening the next, are the ones, who because of work, car payments and the needs for nice things, miss out on just "being there" with their kids. They have the most regrets. You miss too much if you miss school events. You need to volunteer to bake treats, you need to coach a team. You'll wish you'd taken those lazy naps or sat down and watched Barney or Sesame Street- for the thing most need- ed for a good, "goodbye," is the absence of regret. I welcome my kids' ever increasing freedom. I am learn- ing to enjoy mine. But, I do so dearly wish - if only for a day or two- that we could turn back time .... THE ltO;ANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $15 in Meriwether, Talbot or Harris Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR StJlSCltlFrioNS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. Px'rMASTFR: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, HogansviUe, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director ..................................................................... Mike Hale Aociate Publisher and Editor ................................................................. John Kuykendall Managing Editor and Technical Dtrector ........................................... Marion (Ted) Snuth Business Manager ....................................................................................... LeeAun Wilbert A,sociate Editors .......................... Billy Bryant/Talhotton, Michael Smder/Harris County Dan Stout/Hogansville, Caroline Yeager/GreenviUe Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Photography .................................................................................................. Michael Snider Features ............................................................................................................... Lani A. Pike Composing ................................................................................... Valinda lvery, Dori Green Legals ................................................................................................................ Valinda lvery Receptionist and Classifieds .................................................. : ..............  .......... :.Cleta Ybung Pressroom ....................................................................... David Boggs, Wayne Grochowski COReOWE OmCES President .............................................................................. : .......................... MiUard Grimes Vice President ......................................................................................... Charloue S. Grimes Secretary ...................................................................... .......................... Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer ............................................................................................... Kathy C, nmes Garrett LC:gal Counsel and Assistam Secretary .: ................................................... James S. Grimes Intent of Casino Legisl0000tion Being The story is told of a man who was sitting on his porch one day when his friend came by for a visit. There was a big dog lying on the porch and the visitor asked, "Will your dog bite?" The man replied, "No, my dog won't bite." After hearing that, the vis- itor stepped up on the porch and the dog took a big chunk out of his leg. He jumped up and down hollering and hold- ing his leg. "I thought you said your dog wouldn't bite," the visitor yelled, to which the man replied,"That ain't my dog." I tell you that story to make a simple point. The American public has been bitten by a dog that legislators did not think would bite. Read on. A decade ago legislation was passed in our U.S. Congress that opened the doors to casino gambling on Indian reservations. It was intended to strengthen tribal government, encourage trib- al economic development and increase tribal self-sufficien- cy. This was the intent of the legislation. Whether or not life for Indians is any better and whether or not casino rev- enues are having an impact on health, education, housing or other measurements of well being among the tribes is not known for sure at this point in time. In a series of articles done by the Saint Paul Pioneer Press, the newspaper found some rough edges concerning freedom restricting govern- mental practices, worries You Get It Bob Tribble Former Publisher over hefty campaign contri- butions, influential lobbying forces and fears for over dependence on gambling rev- enues. Overall, the Pioneer Press reported that tribal gambling was a growing suc- cess in human terms. The purpose of this column is not to attempt to address the rights or wrongs of casi- no gambling, or the lottery for that matter. I will leave that moral decision up to each of By Ray King yOU. The purpose of this, is though to point out see as a gross injustice American public, that the possible good of legislation is being abused. In other words public has been bitten by a, that legislators did not would bite. When the legislation passed a decade a was to allow casino on tribal res in existence. I don't think the ers intended for the go to places like County or Hancock and gobble up acres of land and bless it ! an Indian res, to build a casino. Surely was not the intent. There is a p legislation in the first and that is the fact that a tain race of American are given the right by our Congress to build casinos, even if only on ent reservations. But, then to allow this ticularrace, to purchase additional vations" across this gn which to construct bling casinos, is rice to other Americans direct slap in the face of and state laws. Some might say that if state can run a lottery why can't the Im nos? Folks, there is a big, difference here. Even I was not one of them. lottery was passed by a ity vote of our citizens. beyond that, the profits go benefit all races, not just I am glad Gov. strongly opposes this move by our Indians, and trust his ence will lead towards Congress quickly their "mistake." Roosevelt Offers America Inspiration (Another in a series) In 1932, American voters desired confidence more than they had in most previous elections. The Depression that had begun in 1929 was the rea- son for that. Franklin Roosevelt went beyond offer- ing confidence. He offered America inspiration. Far from hiding his histo- ry of infirmity, he used it as a confidence-builder. He did it in simple ways, like saying, as he did in one 1931 radio address, that his ailment was the sort that resulted in "the finest natural disposition." He was talking about "the aver- age cripple," not about him- serf, so it was not a boast. But it served, in a minor way to be sure, .to suggest that he would be a calm, unflustered leader in a time of frenzy. He could "keep his head when all about were losing theirs," to quote the sort of uplift poetry he liked. As the 1932 campaign began, there were again whis- pers about his health. Howe was told that some Republicans were going to charge that polio was a pro- gressive disease that eventu- ally affected the mind. Drs. Draper and Lovett prepared a rebuttal to that that was never used. Dr. Hubbard did write--or sign--a lengthy let- ter to the editor of the New York Sun, rebutting any and all charges. "Aside from the weakness of the muscles of his legs...he has been in perfect physical condition." He cited the life insurance policy "at the normal [premium] rate for his age," and added: "Insurance companies are cold blooded and have no sen- timent in their business, and at the time the policy was issued, it was well known that he would probably be a candi- date for the presidency." Roosevelt presented an even more vigorous picture to the nation than he had to New Yorkers in 1928. Primaries were not important then as they would become after World War II. Roosevelt made a few speeches and a very few trips out of New York before he won the nomination at the Chicago convention in July. He took the unprecedent- ed step of flying to the con- vention to accept the nomina- tion. That symbolism of a man on the move was maintained until the election. After a handful of speeches in July and August, Roosevelt embarked on an eight-week continent-spanning cam- paign, in which he made 83 speeches. One of the briefest speech- es he made was to his adoring companions at Warm Springs on October 23. He made a spe- cial trip there from Atlanta, sandwiching the visit between two Atlanta addresses on the 23rd and 24th. The patients and staff, led by Fred Botts in a battered silk top hat, greet- ed him with a small parade. They led him to the front of the hospital. Many young patients were seated in a cir- cle on the grounds. Others were on the porch of the hos- pital. Roosevelt did not leave his car. "Two more weeks to go," he said, to applause. "...First, let me say this: this old hat, a lot of you people have seen it before. It's the same hat. But I don't think it is going to last much longer after the 8th of November. [Laughter, applause] I have a supersti- tion about hats in campaigns, and I am going to wear it until midnight of the 8th of November. [Applause] ...Well, it's fine to see, and I am look- ing forward to coming down here for the usual Thanksgiving party at Warm Springs, and having a real old- fashioned Thanksgiving with my neighbors again. I thank you!" (Applause) He could have said any=. thing and won their applause. To them he was a great sym- The Squire of Warm Springs By Theo Uppman As Frances Perkins, who would become his Labor Secretary, put it, "His rela- tions with the other patients at Warm Springs...were inter- esting and charming to sde. He was one of themhe was a big brother--he had been through it--he was smiling he was courageoushe was feeling fine--he encouraged you to tryhe said you could do it. 'I did it, you can too,' was his attitude." Mary Veeder, the physio- therapist, who saw the reac- tion of the other patients day in and day out for years, said, "He inspired them all. If he'd never done anything but .this, he'd be a great humanitarian." Even in the midst of a cam- paign, Roosevelt knew this and apparently attached some importance to it. Why else the long campaign detour from Atlanta to Warm Springs and back? Even after he became President, he continued to accept his responsibility as symbol of conqueror of dis- ease. One day in the fall of 1935, while in Georgia for Thanksgiving, he came to visit some patients at a Sunday evening devotional. General Evans Carlson later described the scene in a letter to Missy LeHand. "We had placed a chair at the roadside for the President's use, but when he drove up he waved the chair aside. Descending from the car, he drew himself up, and with magnificent dignity and bol of triumph, however his superb will, he walked down political fortunes turned out. " the ramp through the door and forward to his seat amid patients. Never will I that walk, which was formed in utter silence. explanation was ever for what must have supreme effort. But I and I felt that others must have sensed, that it made for the purpose ing hope and inspiration to i assembled patients." Such displays of nation were inspiring healthy Americans as those who recognized a symbol of recovery another kind of paralysis. The fact was that at a of economic paralysis fear, a man who had con physical paralysis and one way or offering himself as a to conquer that other kind, Heusedjust in his acceptance specifically the word ysis" to describe Depression's effects. The word was not used in such a context 1932. And though was not the only one to it is nonetheless note that the edition Webster's New International in use gave only the context of the word sis," while the next appear gave the description applied Roosevelt made sis" a metaphor for depression. Roosevelt and his spe writers often used on this metaphor in the ahead. For example, in he complained that the "sick patients of 1 were cured to the point they could "throw crutches at the doctor." Dr. Roosevelt Springs pool had become Roose,elt to a Dr. New Deal he called self. ' (Next week: Health a pofitical issue.)