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Manchester, Georgia
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August 21, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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August 21, 2003
 

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()pinions &amp; Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - AUG. 21, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS a USPS 620-.040 MJXE PlJBIJSI iER/ADVFA,ITISING DIF.EC'IY)R JOHN KUYKFDALL A.'q.'DC IATE PUBLISIqEIDITOR CLINT CLAYBROOK ASSOCIATE EDrrOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAVNE GOLDSTON BUSIN'bS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188, Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia ,30230 R (rime ublkathm Millard B. Gdmes, President A Word or Two About Winning As the high school foot- ball season draws near, I would like to remind every- one that "winning is not . everything." Or is it? We all judge players, teams and coaches on their winning percentage. If a team has not won a game, then we have to consider that either the players are not very good or the coach isn't. That's not always true. Winning and losing does not determine how good play- ers are on the roster, nor how good the coaches are. It sim- ply means there are a num- ber of factors that can be working against a team. I've heard many fans taunt coaches Over the years at high school football games. Sometimes, it becomes so bad that I want to tell them to shut- up. We often forget that play- ers can perform extremely well and still lose. Coaches can call an almost perfect game and still lose. Losing is not the end of the world. I LOOK FOR efforts by individual players during a game, rather than a total team effort during a game. There. is nothing like seeing a play- er make a great play individ- ually. I try and not think about the score as much as I do the efforts of the players. Not just for the team I'm there to support, but the opposing team as well. I support coaches as well. Unless you've ever been on the sidelines before, I can tell you it's easier to sit in the stands and make a call than do it from the sidelines. There are a number of factors that determine what play a coach will call in any given situation. The first factor in calling a certain play is how well the team can run the play. Second, is how the key play- ers in that play can and will perform. But most of all, how that play may work against the opposing team. There are many others. When we're screaming at the coach how stupid he is form the sidelines, we often forget severalthings and the most important is that he or she has these young players in practice and knows how they will perform in certain situations. During practice, the players are put through every situation the coach can imagine in an attempt to mock what could happen in a game. Timing, blocking, patterns and so much more go into making the right call, but so does the individuals that have to make the play work. A good example of that would be this situation: Let's say that I'm playing a team that is extremely quick and solid on defense. I've tried to run the football unsuccessfully against them and know that I have to go to the pass to move the football. Unfortunately, even though my quarterback has a great arm and my receivers have excellent hands, I'm still out- gunned by the secondary. Easy fix, I pass the ball under- neath, throw dumpoffs, etc. to gain a few yards at a time. However, the problem is my quarterback is extremely slow and the only way I know to keep the linebackers out of his face is by allowing him to throw from the shotgun. Even though we've thrown the same passes time and time again in practice, the opposing team's speed has now entered the game and the timing between my receivers and the quarter- back is off because he is used to dropping back on the pass plays and releasing at a cer- tain point and time. Now, he has to determine when to throw the football. I'm in a totally different ball game. HOPEFULLY, this explains a little about the challenge of the coaching staff and the individual play- ers. The game of football is not as cut and dried as peo-. ple think it is. It requires a number of things going right to win, Including keep key players healthy. SO, win you visit the foot- ball stadium on Friday nights this season, why not trying to look away from the score- board and to the individual efforts of the players and the coaches. You may be sur- prised to learn that you will enjoy the game more, even if your favorite team is losing. Let's also remember that playing sports is suppose to be fun, a learning experience and a way to develop skills. It's not really suppose to be about winning or losing. So, can someone tell me why it is that we place so much emphasis on winning? THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris'or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FoR suE,cnn'rlo call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTER: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director ................................. ,b ............................ Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor .......................................................... John Kuykendall Associate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Claybrook Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ..................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan &eter.Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager .................................. . ................................ Laurie Lewis Composing ............................................................ Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems Legals ............................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulation Manager ............................................................... Barbara Arlene Stccrman Press Manager ................................................................................. Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................... Larry Colleges, Zaddie Dixon,Damell McCauley Mailroom Distribution ............................................................................... David Boggs CORPORATE OFFICERS President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President ............................ , ..................................................... Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer. ................................................................................ Kathy Grimes Garreu Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes The Night I Had It All - Part From Lewis Grizzard's collection "It Wasn't Easy, But I Sure Had Fun On my graduation night, Mama, Daddy and I all sat in the living room waiting for my stepfather, H.B. The sit- uation was completely awk- ward. Daddy tried to tell jokes. Mother and I laughed nervously. It would really be a lot simpler, I began think- ing, if he would just bow out gracefully and there would be no confrontation with H.B. He didn't though. I had painted H.B. as a terrible ogre to him. I guess he wanted, if nothing else, to meet the man. I felt guilty for what all I had said about H.B and for the way I had treated him. There was the time he gave me the money to go to the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville with some of my friends when Mother had insisted he not do it. There was the day I turned 16 and went to get my driver's license. I had been marking off the days for a year. He drove me 30 miles to LaGrange to take the dri- ver's test, and I had to show my learner's permit before I could take it. I hadn't known that. I didn't have my learn- er's permit with me. It was Saturday. I had a date that night, my first where I drove the car. I was devastated by the news that I couldn't get my license. H.B. drove me back to Moreland, then drove my back to La Grange with my learner's permit. I got my license. He let me drive home. I kept my date. My life would have been temporarily ruined if I hadn't. And he'd finally gotten off my back about the chores. He let me drink a beer with him occasionally. And eating the English peas at the father-son dinner hadn't been the awful an experience, now that I thought about it. H.B. DROVE in the drive- way. I prepared for the worst. I am certain Mother did, too. Daddy rose from his chair and walked toward H.B. as he opened the front door. "I'm Lewis Grizzard," he said to H.B. H.B. was startled for a moment, but he regained his composure and the two men shook hands. Mine were trembling. "He's here for the gradu- ation," Mother said, almost defensively. "Well, good," H.B. said. I couldn't believe he said that. "I hope I'm not interfer- ing," Daddy said. This was too good to be true. But there remained the problem of the seats. I had only two. I finally spoke up. "Daddy, we've only got two seats in the auditorium." "I'll just stand in the back" he said. I hadn't thought of that. I felt a little better. "No," said H.B. "I'll be glad to stand up. You and Christine are his parents." For the first time, I saw my Daddy speechless. He finally spat out, "That's very kind, but you don't have to do..." H.B. said, "I insist." THE THREE OF THEM, my mother, my daddy and my stepfather, drove to the grad- uation together in H.B.'s car. I drove my mother's. There was a party for the graduates at the Elks Club in Newnan after the ceremonies. Daddy and Mother sat together while they passed out the diplomas. H. B. stood in the back. I changed a lot that night. I think more than anything else, I realized beyond any doubt that I had been fortu- nate to have a motheI stood by me who made her who had put no matter how much ed it - into mine. I found Daddy principal of the high when I came off the job with our son," he ing. "His ciate it so much." H.B. stood behind with Mother and said ing. I want to Mother said Moreland for about an andthath cious to H.B. for his seat. The graduation wonderful. I got home at| the next morning, hours, and then left a summer job in Driving away Moreland, I sensed never would be a night as fulfilling as the pad just passed. For /ours, I had it all. BY SPECIAL WITH ms WIDOW, HOME NEWS IS CARRYING ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL PRODUCTIONS, p.o. BOX GA 31118-1266 WIDE. Criticizing Alone Won't Be NOw that we have had time to digest .the informa- tion released two weeks ago that approximately 40% of our Tire 1 public schools need improvement, how can we expect this to affeot ur local schools? We are a predominately rural area except for Muscogee County and parts of Harris County. Whereas Harris County is actually more rural than urban, the fact that much of Harris County is a "bedroom com- munity" for Muscogee County qualifies Harris with advantages of an .urban coun- ty. This is most evident in the Title 1 Report of Adequate Yearly Progress released August 5, 2003. We have known for sev- eral years there is a direct correlation between the fam- ily income, one or two parent homes, and certain other social aspects and the grades a student makes in school. We all know, the lower grades a student, or class- room of students make, the less likely the student will pass the CRCT and Georgia High School Graduation tests. There are many causes or reasons for low grades and low test scores that are com- pletely out of the classroom teacher's hands. The more patience and understanding a teacher has, the greater suc- cess the teacher oan expect from the student both on tests and learning ability. Some 25 years ago while serving on the Meriwether County Board of EdUcation, Sam Morris, a dear friend and superintendent of schools, suggested using a reportedly excellent English teacher, Sara Goldenberg, in a low scoring class. WHEN I strenuously objected to the idea on the grounds our college bound students had earned the right to be exposed to a Sara Goldenberg, Sam. Morris looked me in the eye and said, "Don't you think that every- one deserves a Sara Goldenberg?" I had to agree with my friend, ad if we had enough qualified Sara Goldenbergs to go around, okay. If not, the college preparatory group should come first, not because of their station in life, but because Mrs. Goldenberg could give them a foundation grades must have a talent, maybe ent than those who exceptional students. "We need school patrons to help our school, not crifi- IT IS MY and understan&p our test scores acceptable point. many we must be patient check our future test Curriculum, school ities, student family economic statuS, ulty, and community are other ly important in the quality of child gets in a school. that would be more benefi- cial as they progressed up the education ladder. This is the primary rea- son I have strongly opposed any plan that would discharge teachers whose students did not show necessary improve- ment in three years. In short, so much is completely out of the teachers hands. I am strong ifi my belief that teach_ ers who teach low scoring it takes a village, community To hold a school or a: ulty responsible is They must accept their s of responsibility, but so 1 we all. A better education  not necessarily have a tag attached. We: patrons to helI criticize. Good attitudes will to better schools! 50 Years Ago... In the Hogansville Predecessor *VIOLENT HAPPENINGS - Headlines of the Aug. 20, 1 <, Hogansville Herald painted a grim picture for certain 'Billy Pike Struck by Lightning Last Sunday' and 'Jesse Is Crushed Under Load of Lumber.' *BUT COLD ON THE SIXTH DAY-An ad for 'Delicious Glazed Doughnuts' mentioned they were available hot on Saturday. "CINEMA- Movie wise,t he buzz around town had Royal Theatre's showing,showing of 'Gentlemen with Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe. Also on the agenda t week was 'The System,' with 'gangland's terror rule semi-starring Frank Lovejoy and Joan Weldon. Matinee sion tothe Royal was only 40 cents, with kids getting in dime. . *RETAIL OFFERINGS , - Be k-Gallant ran a full- back-to-00choo00 ad ,sting boys qu,00ed ,ned iackets ladies fall suits for $14 95 and boys dungarees for $1.6 those yearning for a celebrity-endorsed foot item, the Profit store had Donald Duck Mayonaise for 29 cents AN ERA OF APPARENT HONESTY: A classified ad it or not, read "Lost:,$20 bill, in the vicinity of City Drug Co. have information, call..." MORE, MORE MORE: The Hogansville Western Aut oi touting the new Emerson 21-inCh TV pointed out that ier tuning and reaches out farther."