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Manchester, Georgia
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August 24, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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August 24, 2000
 

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OPI THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs Mill,and B. Gdmlm, Presid4mt Mucz HAlZ PUBLISHER/ADVEaaTStN G DmEcnm JOHN KmKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHhR]EDITOR BRYAN GE'rlgR /TE EDITOR JAr GOLBSTON BUSXNFAS MAnAC, Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 R O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Clinton's Smear; Fear and Deer Whars up with Bill Clinton? Hasn't he been told that he can't seek a third term? If you heard his opening state- ments Monday night of the Democratic National Convention, it sounded more like a plea for another nomination speech than a farewell address. For over 40 minutes Clinton sounded like he was accepting another nomination. It was sur- prising how little he mentioned A1 Gore. He only mentioned Gore a few times during the speech. Clinton did a good job of upstag- ing Gore and stealing the spot- light. Gore might have to be pre- pared to deal with further upstag- ing by Clinton often in the com- ing months. After all, Clinton appears to be looking for a way to make another mark on histo- ry. It's Really Scary! NIONS & IDEAS PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - AUGUST 24, 2000 Mother Was A G-0000,nmer The other day I had an oppor- tunity to watch a couple of hor- ror flicks on Direct TV. Horror flicks are not among my favote,J .?mUy Qrefer 0me. dy,4m,o gtiiln film, My favorites are Karate movies. I really love any movies starred in by Jackie Chan or Jean - Claude Van Damme. The only reason I tuned into a couple of the flicks after read- ing a Christian magazine that implied our children's minds are being twisted by the horror shows they are viewing. To say the films were grue- some would be an understate- ment. One of the films showed people being dismembered and was pretty graphic. In the other, there wasn't as much violence, hut the scenes it did show were very graphic. After watching the films, I would have to agree with the mag- azine that horror films such as these could have a lasting effect on viewers. After all, I'm 43 years old and it had an effect on me. Maybe it is time for Hollywood to rethink the type of horror films they produce. I know the films are hot at the box office and make a lot of money for them, but I must admit the messages these movies are sending to our young people are not very good ones. Deer, Oh Dear! If you will all remember, I wrote a column not too long ago about deer and our roadways. I was of the belief something should be done to protect motorists. Since that time, the newspa- per has reported several other "Clinton did good job oaf upstaging Gore..." accidents involving deer. I've also received a number of letters from our readers. Of those writing, most were hunters. The results were not what you may first think. Most Mother began saving for my college education with the first paycheck she ever earned. She bought bonds. She put cash in shoe boxes and hid them in the back of her closet. Having enough money to send me to college when the time came consumed my mother. Besides the bonds and the shoebox cash, she kept a coin bank, bought day- old bread, sat in the dark to save on the electric bill, never had her hair done, quit smoking, and never put more than a dollar in the collection plate at church. She used some simple logic for not tithing the Biblical tenth: "If the Lord wanted me to tithe that much, he wouldn't have made college so expensive." Mother had no problems with my intention to study journalism. She wouldn't have cared ff I had studied chicken proctology at the School of Agriculture, just as long as I was enrolled. AS A MATTER of fact, my mother did have something to do with my interest in putting words on paper. My mother was on con- stant grammar patrol when I was growing up. Going to school with children from poor, rural backgrounds, as I did, I often fell in with a bad- grammar crowd. What follows is a glossary of the way a lot of words were mis- pronounced around me constant- ly: "His'n." (his) "Her'n." (hers) "Their'n." (theirs) "That there'n." (That one) "You got air a sack?" (Do you have a sack?) "I ain't got nairn." (No, I'm afraid I don't.) Mother also disliked another common grammatical error of the times. Many of my friends would say, in referring to their parents, "Daddy, he went to town last night;" or "Mamma, she went with him, and they didn't bring us air a thang." "There is no reason to say 'Daddy, he,' " my mother would remind me. "Daddy is identifica- tion enough." "Ain't" of course, was a hang- ing offense. You never got away with double negatives or the pop- ular answer to "Have you done your homework? .... Yes, I done done it." My mother did allow, howev- er, certain words and, phrases common to Southern speech that might not be able to stand a harsh review, in the strictest sense, of whether or not they were proper. My mother, for instance, had no problem with the use of the term "fixing" in place of "going to" or "it is my intention to," as in "I'm fixing to do my home- work." I still say "fixing," and any- body who doesn't like it can stay in Boston and freeze. MY MOTHER also had no problem with certain Southern expletives, such as: "Got-aw-might y"(God Almighty) "Dang-nab-it" (Of all the rot- ten luck) "Dad-gum-it" (Same as above) "Shut yo' mouth," (You're kid- ding me - and please note it's not "Hush yo' mouth," which a lot of people from up North think) "Lawd, have mercy" (About the same as "Shut yo' mouth") Lewis Grizzard Columnist "I often fell in with a bad-gram- mar crowd..." , i I MADE EXCELLENT grades throughout school. Again, if I had- n't, my mother would have inflect- ed both a verbal and physical beat- ing upon me. My constant fear was "What if my mother saves up all that money for my college and I can't get in because I made a C in ancient history? But because I didn't want to disap- point my mother, I studied and paid a fair amount of attention in class and made an A incient history anyway. I applied to only one school, the University of Georgia. My high school counselor, one Mr. "Cheeks" Chandler, as he was affectionately known, told me Georgia's journalism school was one of the best in the country, right up there with the journal- ism schools at the University of Missouri and Northwestern. I remember the day the let- ter came. It said on the front of the envelope, "This is your offi- cial University of Georgia accep- tance." I gave Mr. Killingsworth, my employer at the bank, notice in of the hunters actually agreed with me. They were critical of Qty Deeagement tech- niques tO some degree and stat= ed fewer deer were being taken each year. I received a couple of letters from deer hunters who thought I was full of hot air. Several other citizens (not hunters) wrote in and agreed with me as well. I am in the process of prepar- ing copies of the letters and a drafted letter from myself to address the problem. I will share all ofthis information with a few of our state representatives and make a couple of suggestions on how the deer population can be reduced withgut hurting hunting that muclx While many hunters wrote and stated I didn't appear to know much about dber hunting, that is not true. I grew up in Harris County and began hunting deer at a young age. I still own a pretty big lot of land there. For years, my father and I hunted that land and did a pret- ty good job of managing it. Unfortunately, I know that is not true with every hunter. However, there are techniques that can be used to manage your land and not affect yourhunting that much. They are simple and proven. However, those techniques, can't be used today due to the state restrictions. They will be able to look over them and judge for themselves if the management techniques are effective and non-destructive to the deer population. Tim Hoc;AnaLt HOME Nk'WS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subseriplion rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. For suescRn,noss call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Geoia 31816. Pes'IMAsrw: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. S Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kuykendall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Assistant Editor .......................................................................................... .Rob Richardson Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ................. : ..................................................... Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ............................... : ........................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ................................................................................................. Loft Camp Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Composing ................................................... Wanda Keesee, Deborah Smith, 1 .uren King Legals ............................................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Produ:tion Manager ............................................................................ ; ........... .Roland Foi|es Pressroom .............................................................................. David Boggs and Warren Hill Com,omaz 13nncm President ............  ....................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ....................................................................................... . ....... Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Oarrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. Grimes the middle of August. I his office and Killingsworth, I career in banking is This is my two-week He gazed up at tional chart to still at the bottom of pose, he could handle this so-who-cares attitude. Fie say, "Who cares?," but I, it on his face. What "Good luck, now get .work." BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE HOME CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LEWIS GRIZZARD UP IN NEARBY AND BECAME THE WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS GRIZZARD ALL *AMERICA BUT TICULARLY THIS AREA OF AND WHERE A 8S FROM HOGANSVILLE IS HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD MUSEUM IN 1996, AND A EDITING LAB IS ICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED OF GEOR6 BOOKS AND TAPES ARIg AVAILABLE FOR THROUGH BAD ] PRODUCTIONS, P.O. 191266, ATLANTA, GA 1266ANDAT BOOK ANDI STORES NATIONWIDE. " S Warm Spnng Play,00,a Role in though many of the young phys- iotherapists of 1927 stayed through the 1940s. Dr. Hubbard was replaced by Dr. Michale Hoke, an Atlanta orthopedic surgeon. "He made it an orthopedic cen- ter," Carpenter believed. As the demands grew, Hoke got an assistant, Dr. C.E. Irwin, another orthopedic surgeon - and a brilliant one - who was then at Emory University Medical School in Atlanta. He succeeded Hoke later in the 1930s. By the end of the decade, the medical staff con- sisted of a chief surgeon (Irwin), his assistant (Dr. Stuart Raper), a "general physician" (J.A. Johnson), Alice Plastridge as superintendent of physical thera- py, plus a number of other profes- sional people, including a corsetiere. CARPENTER HAD never been able to work well with O'Connor, who remained treasur- er of Warm Springs Foundation. Carpenter left, to be replaced by Louis Haughey. Botts, uncomfort- (Another in a series) on the priority list like all hospi- tals." - When late in the war one of the new doctors at the hospital at Warm Springs thought he might be drafted, Roosevelt had both his physician, Admiral Ross McIntire, and his military aide, General Edwin "Pa" Watson, intervene. The doctor was reclassified. Roosevelt also put pressure on O'Connor to provide facilities at Warm Springs for servicemen, and a Navy unit was set up there. THE HOSPITAL - technically the Medical Building - had been built in 1939. It was a modern, three-story fireproof 55-bed (later more) orthopedic surgical facili- ty. A school and occupational-ther- apy building also went up in 1939, chapel with "pews" for wheel- chairs, a theater of similar design, two new dormitories for ambula- tory patients, a brace shop. It was quite a campus. (During the war, a new indoor treatment pool was completed. After' the war, other new struc- tures went up, including Roosevelt Hall, a rehabilitation center and auditorium.) The Warm Springs facility's capacity grew gradually. There were 267 patients in residence dur- ing 1934, over 400 in 1941, over 500 in 1942, 700 in 1946. That's not at one time. There were never more than 122 patients there at one time during Roosevelt's lifetime. There were staff changes. A new generation of healers came- Routinely, letters or calls to the White House from influential peo- ple about polio victims were referred to Basil O'Connor or Keith Morgan or some other National Foundation official. And usually the response was to refer the inquirer to the National Foundation chapter in his local community. There are an estimat- ed 3,000 letters to Roosevelt from victims or on behalf of them in the Roosevelt Library for the 1933-45 period. Most ask not for direct aid, but rather for a word of encour- agement or advice. Roosevelt replied personally to around 10 a month on the average until the war started. Thereafter, he personally replied to very few, but Grace Tully answered many in his behalf. However, the war did not divert his attention from Warm Springs. In ways, it focused his attention there. In February 1941, he got a letter from Sumner Welles at the State Department suggest- ing that the son of the President of Paraguay be brought to Warm Springs for treatment of his polio. He said this might keep Paraguay from becoming an ally of the Axis Powers. "S.W. -Excellent.-ED.R.," Roosevelt replied. The young man came to Warm Springs. Fred Botts wrote Roosevelt that he was having trouble getting orthopedic appliances, because of the wartime shortage. Roosevelt sent a memo to his aide James Rowe to "get Warm Springs put able with the alization, tried to resign, talked out of it b. about the good old dayS. Carpenter in 1939, had left the Warm Foundation. The3 Carpenter got the Roosevelt objected to inevitable progress. Henry Toombs friend and the des in Warm Springs, Roosevelt always old pools to the hill in 1942. He was partly due to the I for privacy, partly due to that Roosevelt liked to the early days swimming the old pool, around it (Next week: at Warm Springs) 'THE SQUIRE OF ATTHEGIFrl TLE WHITE HOUSE. TAINS ALL OF THE REPRINTED IN PER DURING THE pAS SALE ALL GO TO SEVELT CENTER. with any homecoming, the house was right at packed. As I looked around the building, I became painfully aware that many were missing from our church family. Those folks had not gotten mad and left, but rather they had gone on to be with the Lord. The time to tell them thank you for their faithful service had passed and now it's too late to tell them thank you for what meant Because one knows fit to take us to our we need to return to an of gratitude. On before the Sunday's activities, we had a for the building and began with the preparing breakfast work time. By the over with, some bers had come out to apostle Paul teaches thankful for those especially our church tells us in Philippians my God upon everY brance of you. Often times we hear the senior citizens of our communities and churches speak of the good old days. Many times they are refer- ring to the simple times in which they lived as compared to today. As those good old days are con- templated, we can find many good things in our world today. We walk in churches today that have com- fortable padded pews, adjustable air controls; public address sys- tems, and even indoor plumbing. Although there are many things that makes these days good as well, there are also things that make these days pale in compar- ison to those days gone by. Some of the things that have changed for the worse are: the times faro- ilies spent together around the dinner table are now spent on the run or in front of the TV, the honor of a man that worked has faded into an abused welfare system, and the treasure of biblical homes are being traded for a cheap sub- stitute. But another thing we find less of today is an expression of gratitude. This past week our church celebrated Homecoming honor- ing the 59th anniversary of Antioch Baptist Church. During the preparations for homecom- ing and during the morning ser- vices, I was clearly reminded about one area that is all to often taken for granted. That area is people: our friends and family. As Consider the Attitude of Gratitude