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Manchester, Georgia
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August 28, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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August 28, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVIIAZ HOME NEWS - AUG. 28, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 ), (6rim tuhliatimt Millard B. Grimes, President JOHN KUYKENDALL PU BLISHDITOR luRm LEWIs ADVERTISING DIRFX.DR CLAROOK AFx)C I ATE EDITOR ROB ICHARDSON .ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE CvOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Goargia 30230 Keep a Smile On Your Face Sometimes life just jumps up and grabs you, gives you a good shake and snaps you back into reality. It doesn't matter who you are, how well off you are, or how good of a person you are.. you're going to have prob- lems. While we as individu- als, and our lives are so dif- ferent, the truth is we all have worries, concerns and things in our lives that are hard to deal with. It can be finances, family problems, stress at work or a million other things, but when it comes to day-to- day life, it's simply not easy. Trying to deal with situa- tions in your life can be dif- ficult. Basically it is because you are too close to the prob- lem. We all react the same way to stressful situations. We first can't believe it's hap- pening, so there is panic and anxiety. Once the reality that something bad has happened to us, we then try and find a quick fix to the problem. That never works. Often we make a very good logical decision, but can't see it through because we realize it may cause us additional stress or hurt someone else. Rather than doing what we know we should, we try to please others and contin- ue our life as best we can. That works until the problem becomes so huge we can no longer deal with it. We either just give up hope or refuse to deal with it any longer. SOME PEOPLE seek pro- fessional help to deal with problems and are prescribed medications to help deal with bouts of depression and anx- iety. The medication helps them feel better, but it does not solve their problem.., it's still there. We all know the only way to overcome a problem is sim- ply to meet it head on. Yes, it probably will cause us more stress and no'doubt hurt the feelings of someone we'd rather not hurt, but in order to solve the problem we must do what it takes to solve it. Life, while it can be diffi- cult, can also be very reward- hag. Sometimes, we let our problems consume us and forget that no matter how bad a situation may be that there is always light at the end of the tunnel. We all deal with problems in a different way, some of us pray and ask for God's help while others seek the help of friends and family. No mat- ter what your preference, you should find someone to console in and share the things that are troubling you. Sometimes, just talking with someone about a situation in our life can not only make us feel better, but also give us a new perspective and some- times even a solution we had never considered. Everyone needs that one special person they can talk with about anything. Sometimes that can be your spouse, anotherTamily mem- ber or just a friend. It does- n't matter really, as long as you can talk with them about it, know that it will remain between the two of you and that the person is genuinely concerned about your wel- fare. However, it is important to remember that just because you seek advice from others, the only thing that matters is that you do the right thing for everyone involved and what is going to make you happy. WE'VE ALL HEARD the cliche, "Life is too short to be unhappy." That is a very true statement. If there is one thing everyone should be, it's happy. I guess if there is a point to this column it is a simple one, and this is it... "Life is not easy, it is very difficult. It changes day-to- day and those changes can bring about stress, anxiety and depression. We can either give in to it or decide that we will overcome it. We should remember that there are thre e things in life that are.the most important (and in this order) God, fam- ily and friends. Without those three things, we can't be happy. We will be' alone and miserable. No matter what comes our way we should remem- ber that there is nothing that can come against us that someone else has not had to face. We should be deter- mined that if everyone else can overcome it, so can we. My advice is this... As you walk through life, keep a smile in your face, a song in your heart, you loved ones and friends near and remain close to Jesus Christ through prayer. If we do those things, while life may not be easy, it will certainly be good." TIlE HI'N;ANSVILI.E HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Hams or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. PerkvJical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FoR SUBSCRII[IONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 318i6. POSTMasTER: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAT Publisher and Editor.....: ................................................ : ..................... John Kukyendall Advertising Director ................................................ Laurie Lewis Associate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Claybrook Business Manager ...................................................................... Jayne Goldston Assis 'rant Editor ....................................... Rob RiChardson Staff" Writers. "'iiiiiiiiiiii'.ii ............ ii'" Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Composing ................................................ i ........... Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems Legals ..................................................................................................... Jayne Gold.on Circulation Manager. .............................................................. BarbaraArlene Steerman Press Manager ................................................................................. Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................... Larry Colleges, Zaddie Dixon,Darnell McCauley Mailroom Distribution ............................................................................... David Boggs CORPORATE Ornt:s President ............. ..i ............................................................................ Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice Preident and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Being Father Tames Wild From Lewis Gr/zzard's collection "It Wasn't Easy, But I Sure Had Fun A friend of mine became a father fSr the first time last week. He's even older than I am. Yesterday, we were sit- ting on the front porch of the fraternity house drinking beer. Today, he's got a son. I remember what the old folks used to say: "Lord, where does the time go?" I didn't understand them then. I do now. So we talked about his kid. "He's got more. hair now than I do," said my friend, whose bald spot showed up four or five years ago. "How big was he when he was born?" I asked. "Eight pounds, 11 ounces. He's going to be a big one." "Did you get to hold him right after he was born?" "Yeah, I had to scrub up, and then I got to hold him. That's when I really realized I had a son. That's when the bonding really takes place between father and son." WE NEVER TALKED about it, but I always assumed my friend had his heart set on a boy child. He's an ex-jock who still is competitive as ever on a tennis court, the golf course or in his den throwing darts. He had a wild streak in him when he was younger, and a lot of lovely ladies stood by with broken hearts and watched him go. He was the best dancer who ever shagged to "Stubborn Kind of Fellow" back in school. He drove a red 1950 Chevy convertible and voted for Barry Goldwater. After school, he flew air- planes, went to war, went into business and built a home the size of a small town. A man like that wants a son. His wife wanted him in the room with her when she bore him his child. "I guess you were pretty happy when you saw it was a boy," I said to him. "It wasn't like that," he said, "My thoughts were more with my wife than with any- thing else. She was a troop- er." 'Tou mean she was in a lot of pain?" "Let me put it to you this way - if it was up to me and you to have babies, there wouldn't be very many around." I WAS IMPRESSED with his concern for his wife tak- ing precedence over any- thing else. Knowing knowing me, knowing much a son would him, and knowing the al insensitivity of most I sensed a friend another phase of One where a to peace with the wind'to move him a and he knows, that in wife and child the only treasures that ly matter anyway. I used to laugh at Now, I'm jealous of it. Lord, go? BY SPECIAL WITH HIS HOME NEWS ED COLUMNS BY THE LATEI GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN: BY MORELAND, MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS TIME. BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STII, PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX GA 31118-1266 WIDE. School: a Parent's Responsibilit The other night some folks in our church gave my family and myself some tick- ets to the Atlanta Falcon's opening preseason game at the Georgia Dome. Upon entering the stadium and see- ing all the things that go along with football season, it became clear that the time of year was upon us. It is time once again for school. It seems like only yester- day that I was attending grad- uation at Callaway Stadium. For some parents this is a dreadful time, still while oth- ers see it as an opportunity to finally get the kids out of the house again. No matter how you view the start of school, may I today challenge you with a view that has become obsolete on the part of a vast number of parents. The view to which I refer is responsibility. Certainly, it is true that students have many respon- sibilities with the beginning of school; the responsibility to learn, the responsibility to conduct themselves in an orderly fashion, the respon- sibility respect, others. Obviously, many more things could be mentioned, but our attention today is drawn not to the responsibility of the pdpil, but to the responsibili- ty of the parents. EVEN THOUGH the child has left the presence of the parents for several hours, that does not relieve the par- ents of their responsibility for their children's actions and education. No matter where or how your child is educat- ed, ultimately, the responsi- bility for the education of chil- dren lies with the parents. Too many children are pawned off on the school system for their secular education and too many children are pawned off on Sunday school teachers for their spiritual education. While a parent may delegate the task of instruction to another, the parent is still held responsi- ble for both the child's secu- lar and spiritual education. The Bible tells us in Deuteronomy 6:7, "And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up." IN THIS DAY and hour in which we live many school systems and teachers being looked down upon. I do real- ize however, there are some teachers and schools that are horribly substandard. While some are below standard, there are still teachers who care about the children and young people who are entrusted to them. There are three teachers "The lessons learned at.the sup- per table are as valuable and real today as they were those many years ago. "" in our church and they do have the right idea about edu- cating our children. Since there are three here, it is safe to assume that there are more, but parents must real- ize that teachers cannot do it alone. The parents must get involved, and help, and stand by their children's teacher. I remember when I was in school that my dad told me that if I got in trouble in school and he found out, I would be in trouble at home, no ques- tions asked. Our teachers would have less trouble at school if there were more dis- cipline at home. Finally, may I suggest that for a better school ents not only need the teachers, but need to get involved their children. By this I mean to find out what the are being taught, what kind have, when they have and even look over the work before it I CAN my school per table had been my mom (a would sit down with homework and before I 1 she often did) would make me turn TV or, ing ball and correct the l takes. Although we spent long hours at the table round and round work, I do not regret involvement of my my schoolwork. Although I was valedictorian or even .salutatorian, the learned at the supper are as valuable as they were those years ago. My their actions hard, take pride in what I and most of all, they me they cared. 50 Yea00 Ago... In the Hogansville Herald 'BILL JONES HAS NARROW ESCAPE' - Jones, genial and popular service and maintenance for the H0gansville exchange of the Southern Telephone Company, narrowly ecaped death Thursday as he was installing a new telephone the office of the Hines Chevrolet Company.' RETAIL DETAILS: Shoppers perusing the Aug. 1953 Hogansville Herald could buy Huba-Huba Belk-Gallant for 69 cents. The store also fall coats for $14.95-$34.50 and boys sports "CINEMA. Movies at Hogansville's Royal included 'Peter Pan,' "a new achievement in motion ture entertainment.,, As an altemative to the flick, patrons, Particularly lonely men, could w:rd to 'Untamed Women,, and their 'veird, rituals..." Other offerings in this era of set included Susan Hayward and Robert Mitchum Witch Doctor." "SEEMs LIKE JUST YESTERDAY WHEN MY CHECK STARTED GETTING SM/LLER -An cle noted th ........ ,= ocial Security is 18 years old..." "CLAssIFIED AD WONDERS: "Several turkey he0s and one gobbler; $50." "LOCK THE DOORS! The Herald continued a of anti-uni0n cartoons as the U.S. Rubber Coml began dealing with organizers This week's showed a couple labeled 'worker' having dinner at restaurant while 'lies' and 'hate' figures interrupt 'We have a grand idea."