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Manchester, Georgia
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August 31, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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August 31, 2000
 

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OPINIONS & IDEAS PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILL, HOME NEWS - AUGUST 31, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-04O A Gnme ublicatiou Millard B. Gdmes, Pnmident MI ICM PUB LISHE, R/AD VERTIS1NG DIRECl'0R JOHN KUVKErALL AssociaTE PtmSHEJEDrrOR BRYAN GrER ASSOCIATE EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 84(>2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Let's Remember What Football Is When it comes to high school football, this area provides some of the best action in the state. Local high school stadiums are usually packed every Friday night when the local team takes to the field. Those fans are there to show their support and love for the local team. While not many things bring communities together anymore, high school football certainly does that. Men, women, boys and girls all visit on Friday nights to watch the hometown team play. They will sit in the stands with friends and neighbors and cheer the team to victory or defeat. ONE THING THE PEOPLE of this area take serious is their football. But it's not only this area,:it everywhere football is played in the good old United States of America. One thing I've learned over the years is not to take the Friday night games too seriously. Having played and coached the sport, I realize it is just a game and life will go on. Somc people however, think if the hometown team doesn't win, life as they know it is over. Bill Shanldy, a football coach, once said it best, "Some people think football is a matter of life and death. I don't like that atti- tude. I can assure them it is more serious than that." Man has never taken losing well. As a matter of fact, histor- ical records show that the emperor of Rome won every event in which he entered dur- ing the Olympics held in A.D. 67. In fact, when Emperor Nero on one occasion fell from his char- iot during a race, the other con- testants politely (and prudently) waited until he had remounted and sped on before resuming the race. And don't forget the words of Henry "Red" Sanders (misat- tributed often to Vinee Lombardi), "Sure, winning isn't everything. It's the only thing." How unfortunate that human nature forces us to think that way. When I look at a game between "Try to look for the great plays made by individ- What's Mainly Learned in A friend whose son wants to grow up and be a writer asked me what courses the young man should concentrate on in high school. To answer, I had to look back to my own high school days. Certainly biology hasn't meant diddly to me as a writer. I could dissect a frog with the best of them in high school, but the need hasn't come up since. NEITHER HAS algebra or geometry, and I knew they would- n't at the time. I basically learned everything I need to know about mathematics in the third grade when they taught me to multiply. 2Vqo times four is eight, which is how many columns I need to write today so I can take a cou- ple of weeks off and work on my upcoming novel. Loarning about ancient histo- ry hasn't benefitted me. Who cares when Rome was sacked? It should have had a better offen- sive line. And geography. There's a lot of sand in Saudi Arabia. I could have learned that later in life sim- ply by watching U.S. Marines wishing for a cold beer as they wait for President Bush to decide whether or not he's going to get some of them killed. History, when I was inter- viewed for this job, nobody asked me anything about Rutherford B. Hayes. They did teach me grammar and punctuation, but that's why we have editors. What I finally decided was the most important course I took in 16 years of schooling was typing. I have used this skill practically every day of my professional life. Mr. Sheets, the basketball coach, taught me tying in my junior year of high school. Tying teachers usually don't get a lot of credit for molding our youth, but in this case I am certainly behold- en to Mr. Sheets. I'M NOT CERTAIN how many words I now have to my credit, but I type each of them. If you can't type, you're going to be in a helluva mess if you want to be a writer. In the first place, you Can't get a job with a newspaper if you can't type. They're going to sit you down at a computer and ask you to produce, and I don't care how much you know about computers, if you can't negotiate the key- board, nothing readable is going to appear on the screen in front of you. Some authors, I am told, write out their books in longhand. That's because they never learned to type. If they had, they wouldn't be scribbling on a sheet of paper for months at a time, which can cause severe pain in the hands Lewis Columnist "Who cares when Rome was sacked? It should have had a better offensive line." and fingers. That's why Edgar Allan Poe wrote all the weird stuff. His hands and fingers were always hurting. The pain became so intense he began to setalking ravens. SO I TOLD my friend to tell his son to enroll in a typing class as soon as possible. "But what about foreign lan- guages?" he asked. tle Japanese," I said. our publishing industry could happen." BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LEWIS GRIZZARD UP IN NEARBY AND BECAME THE WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS GRIZZARD I ALL AMERICA BUT TICULARLY THIS AREA OF WHICH AND WHERE 85 FROM HOGANSVILLE IS HIS HONOR. THE 1 GRIZZARD MUSEUM ESTABLISHED IN IN 1996, EDITING LAB IS ICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED OF GEORG BOOKS AND TAPES ARe AVAILABLE FOR THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, Pg 191266, ATLANTA, STORES NATIONWIDE. ual players FDRDesigned WarmSpringsHo rather than the scoreboard." two teams, I don't see what most people see. I don't see two teams at all, but 22 athletes playing a sport they love. I don't see the game, I see the individual efforts of each player. I don't see win- ners and losers, I see hard work and determination paying off. THIS FRIDAY NIGHT, when you visit the stadium to watch the home team, try looking for great plays by individuals rather than the scoreboard. I believe you will be surprised how much more fun it will be. Please try and think of the hometown players and the oppos- ing team's players as all being young men. Let's treat them as such. While the game is about competition, it is also about build- ing character, a team effort and many other lessons the players will use in their adult life. Let's give all the players what they deserve by displaying good sportsmanship. Mr. Millard Grimes, President and CEO of this news- paper says it best," Let's be kind to one another." Have fun at the game. Opinion Page of The Hogansville Home News are the expressions and ideas of each writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the management. Tim HOGANSVlIJ HOM NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. U SPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR svnscimqlor call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASTF: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. S'rAw Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................. John Kuykendall As,ciate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Business Manager ....................................................................................... .Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ...................................................................... .Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ................................................................................................. Loft Camp Assistant Editor .., ....................................................................................... Rob Richardson Composing ................................................... Wanda Keesee, Deborah Smith, Lauren King Legals ............................................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager. ....... :. ..................... i ......................................................... Roland Foiles Pressroom .............................................................................. David Bogg." Com, oitr On President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................... i ................................................................... Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. Grimes Franklin Roosevelt had a spe- cial attachment for the old poolsinc, at Warm Springs because he had a hand in designing its bath- house. Toombs sent him his plans, and got back a detailed memo and sketch calling for changes. Later when Toombs designed the residence hall, Roosevelt asked for detailed ges. ',Take out linen closets betw'een wards and restore passageway ... Put hand basin in bath room... Put door from West Ward into Chart Room ... Dark Room can be smaller... X- ra room smaller and bath larger ... Toilet next to Waiting Room should enter from Waiting Room and not from Dr. Hubbard's office ... No connection from lower kitchen and upper... Nurse' bed- room taken out of Photograph room and connect to toilet .. In Indoor stair. Why not put outside stair in middle of porch and let it come into middle hallway of base- ment..." All this was hastily scrawled on official stationary in the Governor's Mansion in Albany. Roosevelt's interest in "archi- tecture remained keen, but he bad less impact on Warm Springs buildings after he became President. For one things, Toombs and Arthur Carpenter conspired against him. When Georgia Halls's preliminary plans were drawn, Roosevelt asked to see them. The architect and the business manager sent him instead a sim- ple sketch, "having agreed between ourselves that if we showed him the detail drawings he would surely be full of ideas and probably upset our plans, which were already far along," Toombs wrote later. "We had noted that whenever ED.R. saw a draw- ing, he always reached for a pen- cil." ROOSEVELT "reached for a pencil" a lot. He and Henry Pope conceived the master plan for Warm Springs development in 1926 and 1927. Roosevelt wrote Toombs in the latter year that he favored "[no}" formal location of buildings... In other words a sort of haphazard spacing of the build- ings in proper relation to the trees and the three different hill slopes." He had already by then designed his own first home in Warm Springs, with Toombs doing the drawings and superrising the construction. It was a very simple frame house, based on a typical "Southern Greek Revival" home Roosevelt had seen in a nearby town. He suggested to Toombs that its interior'take the typical "dog trot central hall" and widen it so :: my for others to follow. self followed it. i "He had already by then designed his own first home in Warm Springs, with Toombs doing the draw- ings and supervis- ing the construc- tion." that it could serve as a dining- room-living-room combination. The house cost just over $7,200. Roosqvelt hoped he was setting a pattern of simplicity and econo- IN 1932, he had another house to be called "The Little House", of history. The cost it and a garage. The, influence others. Carpenter had Toombs $12,000 house for him 1934. Of course, that waS s round home, Pierson's Toombs-design cost $45,6000 in i935. (Next Week: The House). 'THE SQUIRE OF OF WARM SPRINGS TLE WHITE HOUSE. TAINS ALL OF THE PER DURING THE pAST PROCEEDS FROM THI I SALE ALL GO TO SEVELT CENTER. Differentiating Discipline and A Any one who has seen the news in recent days had to be hor- rified at the report of the thir- teen-year-old boy who was beat- en to death in the name of disci- pline. There is no one who believes the Bible teaches that spanking is a legitimate form of discipline more than this preach- er does, however, no one believes that child abuse is an abomina- tion in the sight of God more than this preacher either. The Bible says in Proverbs 29:15 "The rod and reproof give wisdom: but a child left to himself bringeth his mother to shams." But just as the Bible teaches such discipline, Jesus taught us in Matthew 18:6. "But whoso shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it is better for him that a mill- stone were hanged around his neck, and that he be drowned in the depth of the sea." Jesus teach- es discipline, but he also con- derrms abuse. THE PROBLEM is that a lot of parents do not know how to dis- cipline using the 'rod'. Many times a parent will reach over and slap the child across the mouth when they say something inappropri- ate, or they will just lean over and slap the top of the leg when they feel like the child has done some- thing out of line. Both of these actions I feel are wrong and are, in my opinion, a mild form of abuse. When administering spanking as a form of discipline, there are several things that must be kept in mind. The foremost thing is: discipline must be admin- istered with an attitude of love and not anger. It is never appro- priate or wise to spank a child while angry. We must remember that discipline is a way to show our children that we love them. The writer of Hebrews tells us in chapter twelve and verses five through seven,' And ye have for- gotten the exhortation which speaketh unto you as unto chil- dren, My son, despise not thou the chastening of the Lord, nor faint when thou art rebuked of him: [6] For whom the Lord loveth he chas- teneth, and scourgeth every son whom he receiveth. [7] If ye endure chastening, God dealt with you as with sons; for what son is he whom the father chas- teneth not?" ANOTHER THING that must be kept in mind is that spanking doesn't have to be the first form of discipline that is used to cor- rect a problem. The verse previ: "When adminis- tering spanking as a form of discipline, there are several things that must be kept in mind. The foremost thing is: discipline must be administered with an attitude of love and not anger." ously cited from Proverbs also refers to reproof. The word reproof refers to rebuke or cor- rection as a means of discipline. When a child does do something out of line, a parents does not have to spank right off. It seems that when a parent spanks: the parents is anger or j real discipline that is nurture and train a are abused while the the Bible as also there are many need the biblical form ing who are not getting world it is becoming ly difficult to train up ents need the ance that only the HolY give. Spanking is abuse is abominable. ciplining of our children, follow the examples of Father as he chastens dren. He first showing them the sin, l suffering, but t once causes his love to l ed. Then when the time discipline in a is warranted, then He ters it. IT IS TRUE that today sometimes need but it is even more children of today that loves them and up in of the Lord. (EphesianS