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Manchester, Georgia
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September 4, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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September 4, 2003
 

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Opinions &amp; Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVII JY, HOME NEWS - SEvr. 4, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A (6rtnm, zbliatt,n Millard B. Grimes, President JOHN KUYKENDAIJ PUBLISt tER/Et)IT(m LAUmE LEWIS ADVF, RTISING DIRE(YFOI< CIJNT CLAYBROOK As. JCtATF EDrroR ROB RICSON A.%':, l STANT EI)ITOI, JAX'NE GOLOSaXN BUSINFSS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188 - Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 I logansville, Georgia 302.) Remembering The Old Days Ouch! Gas prices are soar- ing again all over the nation. I hate to tell you folks; but we're lucky here. In the last month, we've seen gas prices jump by almost 20 cents per gallon in some places. With Labor Day behind us, we should see the prices begin to come down. If you think it's bad here, you might try travelling to other places. This past weekend I trav- elled to Pensacola, Florida. You wouldn't believe how I watched the gas prices rise the further I travelled south. In Columbus, the prices were about like here. Prices averaged about $1.51 per gal- lon. When I crossed the Alabama line, those prices jumped about five to six cents per gallon. By the time I reached Florida, prices aver- aged about $1.63 per gallon, or about ten cents more per gallon than around here. As I said, the prices should begin to fall a little after the Labor Day holiday, but don't expect them to drop that much., The reason the prices continue,to stay high is sim- ply that ventories are down, or at least that is what most of the gas station attendants I spoke with told me. According to a news story I read in a newspaper some- where, the nations gas inven- tories are down about 5.9 per- cent over last year's stock at this same time. That makes gas a more valuable com- modity. On the average, Americans pump about 390 million gallons of gas into cars each and every day through- out the nation. That's an awful lot of gas. We all sometimes forget that state and federal taxes are now added to the price of gasoline. In Georgia that add- on is about .31 cents per gal- lon. Alabama adds on about .49 cents per gallon. Florida adds a whopping .52 cents per gallon. So, between the tax add on and the lower inventory, we've seen gas prices soar quickly. I'M NOT really complain- ing about the gas prices. It wouldn't do any good anyway. The simple fact is, if I don't want to pay the price I guess I'll just drive less. Really, when compared to prics of other things, the cost of gas really isn't that much. Let's compare a few items. On the average, we pay about $3 per gallon for milk. That's not really bad, either. For those of us that like to drink coke, we spend on the average about $3 to $4 per gal- lon for it. Think about we. We'll walk iqto our favorite store and pay about $1.50 per gal- lon for water and not give it a second thought. Now, do we want to talk about alcoholic beverages? Some of those would cost us up towards $50 per gallon or more. My point is, there are things we do each day of our lives that cost us more per gallon than gasoline, but we don't complain about what it cost us. We just fork over the money.., that is if we want to buy it. THE ONLY REASON I think about gas prices so much is because as a news- paper person I have to do a good bit of driving each week. For people like myself that have to drive a great deal, it can get costly. As you can see however, we spend far more .money on other items that we like to pur- chase. It still doesn't make it palatable to have to pay such high prices. The fact is, I can remem- ber when gas was less than .30 cents per gallon. I guess that's what makes prices of over $1.50 per gallon seem to be so high. Of course, back then a Coke was about .25 cents; an ice cream was about the same price. Today, those same items or $1 or higher. It's sad to begin to get old. I used to hear my Mom and Dad talk about'the good old days: I told myself when I got older I would never do that. Well, guess what? Here I am talking about the good old days. I used to bug my Dad for a quarter so I could go to the store. My kids asked for dol- lar bills. My grandson now asks for a five spot. With the cost of every- thing soaring, even at the risk of sounding like my room and dad, I kind of miss the good old days. All I can do is remember though, because we're paying less for items today than we'll pay tomor- row. Tt: HOGANSVlI.LE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury ublishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt ltighway, Manchester. Gex)rgia 31816, USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical IXrstage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FoR SUBF,JCRIPTIONS call (706) 840-3188 or write to Circulation Mmiager, Slat" Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester. Gecwgia 31816. POGTMASTERI Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFE Publisher and Editor. ........................................................................... John Kukyendall Advcising Director .................................................................................. Laurie Lewis As,ciate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Claybrook Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ..................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff Writers ....................................................... v ................. Bryan GeterBilly Bryant Composing .......................... .: ................................ l)cwayne Flowers. Rebel1 Weems [gals ...................................................................................................... Jayne (;oldston Circulation Manager. .............................................................. Barbara Arlene Steenuan Press Manager. ................................................................................ Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................... LaiTy Colleges, Zaddie Dixon.Damell McCauley Mailroom Distribution ......................................... Day d Boggs COm'ORAI OFFtt:ERS Ih'esident ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grilncs Vice President .................................................................................. Charknte S. Grimes Executive Vice Presidenl and Secretary ........................................ l,aura Grimes Cofer I'reasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrctt Legal Ctmnl and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes On Choosing the 'Write' From Lewis Grizzard's book, "It Wasn't Easy, But I Sure Had Fun" Uncle Grover couldn't read. But each day when he and Aunt Jessie left the mill to drive home for lunch, a quarter mile away, they would stop by the post office, which was next to the knit- ting mill. There they would stop to pick up their mailed morning edition of the Atlanta Constitution and bring it home with them at lunch. Atlanta was a lot far- ther from Moreland back then than it is now. When I was ten, it was at least five thousand miles to Atlanta, because I knew my chances of ever getting there were quite slim. Today, it's a thirty five minutes by inter- state. My grandmother's yard looks a lot smaller to me when I see it now, too, so you know what time does to a lot of things. Shrinks them. By the time I was ten, my brain was well on its way to being consumed by baseball. A lot of boys are like that, of course, but I may have gone to extremes heretofore unachieved. I never actually ate a baseball, or any other piece of baseball equipment, but I did sleep with the base- ball my grandfather gave me for my birthday, and proba- bly the only reason I didn't eat it was I knew my grand- father certainly was not a man of means and might have had a difficult time replacing it with any sense of dispatch. There was a marvelous baseball team in Atlanta when I was ten. They were Atlanta Crackers. For years, I thought they were named the Crackers because they had to do with, well, crack- ers. Later, I Would learn that the term came from the fact that Georgians were bad to carry around whips in the days of Jim Crow and slav- ery. And whips go "crack", and, thus, the name of the ball team. But at ten, in 1956, my world was an almost totally isolated one, and I finally decided the name bad some- thing to do with saltines, but I didn't have time to figure out exactly why or how. Uncle Grover bought the first television set in Moreland. When word got out, people came from as far away as Grantville, Luthersville, and Corinth to get a glimpse of Uncle Grover's and Aunt Jessie's amazing box. It had about an eight-inch screen, if I recall correctly, and you had to sit real close if you wanted to see any detail, such as whether or not someone on the screen actually had a head. The adults would watch John Cameron Swayze on the national news, and Vernon Niles. Aunt Jessie usually held the paper, while Uncle Grover drove the car. She would never make it into her house with the paper, howev- er. I would meet her as she stepped out of the car, and she would hand over that pre- cious folding of newsprint. I ALSO became quite fond of the Atlanta Journal because the sports included Furman column. It was funny. It biting. It was a daily ure. I made up my mind when I became a writer, I would rather for the Journal than Constitution. You have work out the details of career early. The odd thing I look back, after makin decision as to what to do my life, it really difficult achieving it. it's because I was Maybe it's because my sion was just so right. I really know. I do know most everything pened to me newspaper business has natural and that must something. BY SPECIAL WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, HOME NEWS IS CARRYING El) COLUMNS BY GRIZZARD, WHO GREW MORELAND, AND WIDELY READ WRITER BOOI PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA AND BOOK WIDE. MTV Three-Way Kiss a New We shouldn't be sur- prised. Really we shouldn't be shocked. The other morning while getting ready for the day, the news was on, then all of a sud- den there it was, plastered all over the screen. I changed to another news channel, it happened again, andagain, and again. I even changed toa SlOrts channel, and lo and behold, there it was. You may be wondering what in the world I am refer- ring to. I am referring to what the news media has labeled, "The Kiss". On some awards night on MTV, three so called female superstars of the rock world kissed. If you happened to be one of the unfortunate ones to see it, you know that it was more than a friendly peck, It amazes me why parents sit and wonder what is wrong with their children and teenagers, when those very parents allow them to view such filth on TV. It also amazes me how the news media can laugh it off as some publicity stunt, while the morals of our nation run down into the sewer. However, as I said earlier, we should not be surprised. All we have to do is read even casually in the Word of God and we find that such things would characterize the days in which we live. The Bible plainly states that in these days there would be a falling away from the faith and that men (humans) would be without natural affection. Ladies and gentleman, may I submit to you that our coun- try is rotting from the inside out. IN RECENT WEEKS we have been confronted with the fact that the Christian standards upon which our country was founded are gradually being thrown out with yesterday's dishwater. From the appointment of a homosexual to a high denominational position, to the fight over the Ten Commandments, and now to "the kiss", I wonder what will be next. We must understand that even though time march- es on and people, and prac- tices, and circumstances change, moral absslutes never change. What is right and what is wrong is wrong. What is sin is sin. It is no wonder that our country is falling into the gut- ter morally when our justice system deems that we do not need the Ten Commandments where justice is to be meted out. It is no wonder there is such a display of lesbianism :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::  ..... '( :, : ? ii "Ladies and gen- tleman, may I sub- mit to you that our country is rotting from the inside out." on TV when we see locked the very laws God has laid down for us in a back room some- where. You may think that I am picking on three separate incidents from the latest news stories. UNDERSTAND these incidents may be separate in practice, but they are the same in principle. The under- lying principle behind the appointment of a homosexu- al bishop, the removal of the Ten Commandments, and the lesbian displayed kiss on TV are all the result of our nation kicking God out and doing that which is right in our own eyes. If one would book of Judges in the it would not take long to ' that God judged his for doing in their own eyes. We today that folks do not anything wrong with displays on TV. The isn't do we think it is but what does it? ...... We as Christians mayt be able to stop all that out of Hollywood, but we sure keep it We can keeF teenagers from viewing it the television. We can teach our., people that our country n't become so longer need to be told shalt not kill. We can our young people that haven't become that we no longer need told thou shalt not adultery. tha so God fearing that we longer need to be told, shalt have no other before me. Maybe if would teach the Commandments more home, we wouldn't have wouldn't have to watch such as MTV. I don't you tell me. 50 Years Ago... In the Hogansville Herald Predecessor to the Hogansvme Home NeW "HELPFUL INSTRUCTIONS - A Chevrolet ad in the Sept. 3, 1953 Hogansville Herald want" ed to make sure potential buyers weren't toO itimida!ed about driving. 'q'urn the key to start e engine and you're ready to go," explained iext. NO IMITATION COWPOKES- An ad for Jabaley's. Hogansville's oldest department store - offered "Real western cowboy pants." qNTERESTING CHOICE OF WORDS- The Royal Theatre ad touted Marilyn Monroe in a "big double feature." Also causing a stir was 'Arena,' "the first 3-D westem! The 65-cent ticle et included tax and 3-D glasses. t" "AUTO SELECTIONS- Hines Motors adver" tsetl a variety of used vehicles, including a ' Chevrolet for $395 and a '48 Frazier four-doo for $695. GO AWAY! GO AWAY! The Herald con" tinued to stand in the comer of U.S. Rubber aS its' series of anti-union cartoons appeared. Tills week's entry was 'q'he Discord Family Wants in." TEMPTING CLASSIFEDS: 'Wanted: worg mare that has colt or has colt by side."