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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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September 5, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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September 5, 2002
 

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/ ()pinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS -SEPT. 5, 2002 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS __ Yes, It s Only Sheepskin MI HAI PUBLISHER]ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKFnDAI ASSOCIATE PUBLISt3/EDITOR RoB l?aN ASSLSTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOM:)SIN BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 A 6rtmu lJublL,'an Immm:l a. GIU, Pmdlat " Parents Should I Teaeh Driving L While there are so many things parents should worry about with their teens, most often driving is one that we don't worry about as much as we should. Vehicle crashes continue to be the leading cause of teen deaths. We all talk with our teens . that drugs can kill, that tobac- co can gi.V,9 e.4.r, and crash forces of more than two evet [, we-. fs based on the speed of the vehicle at the time of the col- lision. The result of those major forces is often death." HERE ARE a few sug- gestions that will help pr e- pare your teen for driving: * Provide the appropriate number of hours of teen driv- er supervision as directed in the qLenage and Adult Driver Responsibility Act (TADRA). Set passenger limits. The changes of crash, injuries and death increase with the number of passen- gers in a vehicle. * Warn new drivers about the dangers of speed and its effect on the driver's ability to control the vehicle. * Remind teens to avoid ::cell phone use and changing the radio or CD player while the vehicle is moving. Remind teens that alco- hol and drug intoxication are not only against the law, but are a deadly combination. PURCHASING THAT first car for a teen can add to the chances of car crashes as well. While boys, more than girls, usually like a car with a V-6 or V-8 engine, you many want to consider purchasing something smaller. If not, then lay down some guidelines for driving that car or truck. When my son turned 16, I bought him a V-8, but I told him that if anyone told me he was driving over the speed limit, or if he ever got a speed- ing ticket, I would take the keys away. He drove V-8s throughout high school and college, but never once was issued a citation. Preparing teens to drive , just takes good common sense and preventive meas- ures. When it comes to driv- ing for teens the old cliche, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" is cer- tainly true. For more information about safe driving rules for teens and the facts about the Georgia TADRA taw, call 1- 888-420-0767 or 404-656-6996 or visit the GOHS web site at wwwgohs.state.ga.us. often forget that driving can be just as deadly. The Governor's Office of Highway Safety (GOHS) has for years urged parents to take time to ensure that new teen drivers are educated with the proper driving skills before allowing them to drive independently without super- vision from an experienced driver. In Meriwether, Harris and Talbot Counties there have been at least six fatali- ties involving teen driver that I can remember over a peri- od of about 12 months. It is devastating to a parent to lose their child in a car crash. Unfortmlmtely, no matter how much we prepare our , teens for driving,.it dtmsnot "mean they won'tbe killed in a car accident, but at least they will have the necessary skills to drive safely. Over I,I00 young people, ages 16-20, died in motor vehi- cle crashes in Georgia from 1996-2000. many young driv- ers involved speed and driv. er inexperience. These fac- tors prevent serious reasons for parents to set guidelines and educate young drivers before turning over the keys. i DURING THE 2002-2003 school year, GOHS will once again offer opportunities for educators, Parent Teacher Associations and youth organizations withing : schools to collaborate with community traffic safety advocates, medical providers and law enforcement to pro- vide roadway safety educa- i tion programs. In additioq, t : GOHS will distribute educa- , tion materials and support strong enforcement to reduce the number of teen deaths and increase seat belt use. GOHS Director Yvounel McBride continues to empha- size the importance of seat belt use among young driv- ers and their passenger According to McBride, seat belt dse is a proven life- safer. "Unbelted vehicle occu- pants can fly forward with Tug HOGAVlU.g HOME Ns is published weekly by the Star-Metrur> Publishing Compaay, a division tffCnimes Publications. at 3051 [(xevelt Highwa); Manchester. Geoegia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subdption rates by mail: $18 in Tamp, Harris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elwhere. Prices include all roles ttut. Periodical poslage Imid at Hogansville. Georgia ?d32.a). Fog  call (706) 846-3 ! 88 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publ P. O. Box 426. Manchester. Georgia 3t816. : Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansvitle. GA 30230. STAW Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hate A';ciate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Ku) kendall Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Agsi,qant Editor ..................................................................................... Rob Richards( Staff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryam Laune Levqs Agistant AdveNising Manager .................................................................. " ": Adiag Sales ....................................................................................... Linda Lester Cng ................................................................ Dewayne Fkm,e, Valinda hv D, Citctdation Manag .................................................................................... Judy rcw. Legals. ................................................................................................. Jayne Gdslt Pl,sroum M ....................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pms. ...................................... .David Boggs, Larry Colleges. Shannon'Atkinson Z Omctm m ............................................................................................. Mill'aM B. Grimes Vk'e President ................................................................................. CharloUe S. Gnmes Secretary ......................................................................................... Laura Grirnc Corer Tmasm ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Cotmsl and AssistmR Sacretary .............................................. Jathes S. Grimes Everyone worries about how much it costs to go to col- lege. I read a figure that said the cost of one year of schooling at prestigious institutions such as Yale and Harvard and other places, where the football teams never go to a bowl game, was $20,000. One female student inter- viewed on the Yale campus said, 'I think it's worth it." A Porsche is worth it at $S0,000, too, if Daddy's check is coming in each montk It's been 20 years since I was in college, but I still feel I am qualified to offer a few sug- gestions to parents as to how to cut down the price of edu- caring their spoiled Little dar- lings. If you can fm2mce $20,000 a year on what you make in annual sahry down at the plant, and your kid wants to go to Har,,ard because it's the best place to go if you want to meet, and perhaps later marry, a Kennedy, suggest alternatives. "How about good or State U?" you might ask Your kid's eyes will roll back in his or her head, the clas- sic teenage expression that means you have been com- pletely out of touch with what's happening since the year Rome was sacked Then say, "Okay, I can afford Harvard and you don want to go to State U, but I can get you on the third shift at the plant." That should work YOU wouldn want your kid to meet and marry a Kennedy anyway. Those people probably wear ties at dinner. SPEAKING of work, here's another way to cut down on what it costs to put your child through college. Suggest heor she get a part- time job to help pay for some of the expenses. This sugges- tion likely will send your child into a fainting spell "But how." your daughter will ask, when she is revived, "can I work and still have time to be on the Homecoming float committee at the sorority house. Explain how you had to sell magazines door-to-door to put yourself through college, and if she doesn't get a job, there won be enough for sorority dues. Your daughter will hate you, but only until her own chil- dren reach college age. Here some other ideas of .w to cut the high cost of col- lege: 1. Never send your children off to school with a convertible sports car you will have to repaired. A college-age vidual with a wear the writing tic before 2. Don allow ' do anything or her sell used cars, is a television evangelist 3. As soon as your leaves for college, new address and get ed phone number so yoe be getting any letters calls begging for moneY. BY SPECIAL WITHHISgqDO; N%'WS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LATE GRIZZARD, g%lO GREW UP IN BY MORELAND, MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS TIME. BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC STORES WIDE.' Just Hitting the Nail on the We have been told that our public school system and its high school seniors in the 174 public school systems rank as 50th in the nation in fig- ures recently released according to state and nation- al SAT scores. Many of us were astound- ed at Governor Barnes' announced solution to this problem of low scoring stu- dents from grades K-12. If students scored low, teachers would be put on a type of pro- bation. If scores did not show improvement, eventually teachers would be fired. Already too many first and second year teachers accept their first teaching jobs in rural areas like Talbotton, Greenville and Woodbury until a teaching position comes open in sur- rounding towns. FROM THE POINT of state pay, rural and city sys- tems are the same. Supplements in nearby medi- um and large systems are often and usually much high- er than rural supplements. Immediately, this gives urban or city systems an advantage over rural sys- tems. These city systems take advantage of a larger tax base and more sales tax funds to provide these systems more funds to operate. This is another advantage city sys- tems have: more money to operate schools. Even Governor Barnes seems to have recently backed away from his early thoughts to "fire" teachers whose students failed to show improvements on test scores. I have always thought Governor Barnes' statement on the subject of remedies for low test scores was ill ground and have a great bear- ing on students' test scores. Even where industry has come to poverty-stricken areas, it has been found the potential workers do not have the educational level required of many of the bet- ing historical sites are met through school trips. It is not good fair to the child to many parents. throe, parents know about these that could their children a wider of knowledge. Furthermore, most ents in rural counties are busy making a living to I their children a roof over their heads. Discipline tor that must be room to make advised and assinine, ter paying jobs. was suspected for some time. The economic factors relat- ing to the students' parents and even their grandparents have more to do with produc- ing high test scoring students than even the faculty in all public schools. BOTH TALBOT and Meriwether County have made great strides in recent years through their respectable Chambers of Commerce and industrial boards. Bringing industry into the county will serve to eventu- ally improve family back- Meriwether County a learning atmosphere. and ........ Pdvdff are have many attempting to correct this short term problem through improvement in adult educa- tion programs in both day and night classes. It is a proven fact that rural systems are not fund- ed on the same level as urban systems. This and the eco- nomic advantage urban stu- dents enjoy are too great for the State Department of Education to ignore. MANY CULTURAL advantages urban school sys- tems enjoy like museums, concerts, lectures and visit- not have time to their children. Not all, many of these students never been exposed ly organization and pline. SEVERAL YEARS when Dr. serving on the School Board I heard hi $ "You might not teach dents anything with pline, but you sure will teach them anything I believe the In the Hogansville GRAB A BROOM: Fred Redrr3nd of proclaimed the wek Sept. =Clean Up Week" The move is sponsored Council and encouraged by Better Home Town Contest of Georgia Power Company." *JUST THE FACTS: local schools received this from Ben T. Huiet, Commissioner of Labor, tion concerning the of children under 18 years Young people who are not yet' years of age should secure permits from the office or county school superintende, CLUBBING: E. Trippe, president of Hogansville Garden announced this week that Hogansville Garden Club ed to the Ector Daniel Room of the Presbyterian Church a brass andirons in August." BUT BEFORE YOU FOR LUNCH: "Screw worms, livestock pest in Georgia, from flies that lay their eggs wounds where they develop flesh-eating maggots."