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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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September 18, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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September 18, 2003
 

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Ot00inions & Ideas PAGE 4 - I IOGANSVILLE ItOME NEWS - SEPT. 18, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 ,, (rtme. luhlkatimt Millard B. Grimes, President ,][OLIN KUYKENI)AI J, |11 IH JSI IEIffEDIT()R LAURIE ]-:WlS AI)VERTISIN(; DIRI;;(WOI{ CLINT CIAYBR(H )K /,S(X ?1ATI.; EI)ITOI ROB RICHARDSON A:c'qsq'A NT EDrrrm JAYNE GOLDSTON B u st N F2',;S /VIANA(;ER Phone (706) 846-3188 Fax (706) 41,,-2206 P. O. Box 426 1 togansville, Georgia 30230 From the Mouths of Babes and Older Kids It's amazing what chil- dren can say sometimes. The thing about young children is that they are brutally honest and don't see any harm in the things they say. My five year -old grand- son will come up with some things sometimes that are simply side splitting. One day at the pool, a rather large lady showed up. I was afraid he ws going to say something andbven cau- tioned him about doing so. The lady jumped into the pool and splashed him. He looked over at me and said, "Paw Paw, that lady wouldn't make as big of a splash if she would lose some weight." Here's a few others that I picked up from somewhere else: A new nelghbor asked the little girl next door if she had any brothers & sisters. She replied, "No, I'm the lone- ly child." A mother was telling her little girl what her own child- hood was like: "We used to skate outside on a pond. I had a swing made from a tire; it hung from a tree in our front yard. We rode our pony. We picked wild raspberries in the woods." The little girl was wide- eyed, taking this in. At last she said, "I sure wish I'd got- ten to know you sooner!" My grandson was vis- iting one day when he asked, "Grandpa, do you know how you and God are alike?" I mentally polished my halo while I asked, "No, how are we alike?" "You're both old," he replied. A little girl was dili- gently pounding away on her father's word processor. She told him she was writing a story. "What's it about?" he asked. "I don't know," she replied. "I can't read." A ten-year-old, under the tutelage of her grand- mother, was becoming quite knowledgeable about the Bible. Then one day she floored her grandmother by asking, "Which Virgin was the mother of Jesus: the Virgin Mary or the King James Virgin?" ISN'T IT FUNNY how kids can simply say the fun- niest things? The other thing I love about children is their ability to simply tell things the way they seem them. One day my grandson and I were in MeDonalds and a gentleman was giving the girl behind the counter a piece of his mind. He apparently was upset about his meal or some- thing. My grandson gave his pants leg a tug, looked up at the man and said, "You should be nice. My Paw Paw says you should be nice." The man immediately calmed down. I thought how funny it was that if I had done that, the man would have probably wanted to punch me out. But, because my young grandson did it, it simply embarrassed him. This brought another thought.., wouldn't it be great if we were all like little chil- dren. We could tell people exactly what we think with- out fear of making them angry. We would walk through life with rose colored glasses and see things in an entirely different light. Christ also believes that. The Bible tells us, "We must become as little children." Of course the Lord is not speak- ing of their way of saying funny things, but of how we must trust and believe as lit- tle children. While children have the ability to say and do funny things, they also trust com- pletely in Mom, Dad, Granddad, Grandmother and friends. RECENTLY, I'VE BEEN going through some things in my life that can distract you from what is really impor- tant. Sometimes the big pic- ture in life allows us to lose sight of the little things that are really important. " My grandson made me a flower recently. The pedals of the flower are made from his hand prints. The leaves on the.stem are made from his foot prints. It was a great present and I love it dearly. However, what is most important about it is that it catapulted me back into real- ity. While life has been diffi- cult lately, I had lost sight of what is really important in life. How often have you thought about how happy you were as a child? Life was carefree and you lived each day to its fullest. You look for things to make the day fun. Today, we work and live to survive. I think we should all become as little children and live to be happy. I think if we make ourselves happy, life will be better for all of us. THE HOGANSVil.LE HOME NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company. a dlvisitm of Grimes Publications, at 3051 RcK)sevett ttighway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Peritxlical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230.Single copy 5o. FOR SUICRil,rlOS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circnlation Manager. Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Grgia 31816. POSTMAS'IER: Send address changes fo E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF ublisher and JJitor ............................................................................ Iohn Kukyendall ,dvenising Director .................................................................................. Lmde Lewis Asociate Editor ................................................................................... (,'lint Claybrook Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston AsSistanl FAitor ..................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff Writers ........ Bryan Geter Bill)' Bryant ompos ng .......... iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'"'ii'iiiiiiiiiTiiiiiiiiiiii"Dewayne Howers Rnen Wc,.,ns Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulatkm Manager. ......... : .................................................... Barbara Arlene Steennan Press Manager ................................................................................. Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistant ..................... Larry Colleges, Zaddie Dixon,Damell McCauley Vlailroom Distribution ............................................................................... David Boggs Commxr: OI,'Ht'IRS csidcnt ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ I.aura Grimes C(,fer Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Leg',d Counl and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Nothing Like Seeing Your N From Lewis Grizzard's collection "It Wasn't Easy, But I Sure Had bm Uncle (;rover and Aunl ,Jessie took the weekly Newnan Times l lerahl. When they brought it home at Thursday noon, 1 opened it even before the Constitution. Besides, the Cracker game had been on television the night before, so I'd seen little Ernie Oravetz lead the Chaltanot)ga Lookouts to an easy 9-4 vic- tory. I will never forget gazing upon my name appearing in a newspaper for the first time. In fact, my name appeared in the newspaper for the first time three times. The headline read: Moreland's Lewis Grizzard No-Hits Macedonia 14-0 Then came my byline: By Lewis Grizzard Then came the lead of my story, "Brilliant Moreland right-hander Lewis Grizzard..." I had also mentioned my heroic exploits to the lady who wrote the column aboul who had iced tea and water- melon with whom, in hopes i she might also make mention of my no-hit game. But she said she ran out of space because there was so much to tell about the women's Bible class taking a trip to an all-night gospel singing in Grantville that featured leRoy Abernathy and Shorty Bradford (known as "the Happy Two"), as well as the Sunshine Boys, the Blackman Brothers Quartet, and a little blind girl who sang "Just As I Am." There wasn't a dry eye in the house after that line- up. Despite that, I still broke into organized baseball and sportswriting in a big way, and I would wonder after- ward if there was a possibil- ity I might play for the Crackers when I grew up and also cover the games and get paid by the Constitution. My dream of pitching profes- sionally, however, came to an abrupt end my senior year in high school. The bused those of us out in the county to Newnan High School. IT WAS my final game as a Newnan High School base- ball player. We were playing mighty Griffin. We led 3-2 in the bottom of the sixth when I faced the Griffin catcher, who with two outs and the bases loaded, looked about 25 years old. I had whiffed the Griffin catcher in two previous plate appearances with slow curveballs, two strikes. My coach called time and came to the mound. "Grizzard," he said, "don't throw this guy another one of those slow curveballs. He's seen too many of them already." What did he know? The slow curve was my out pitch. The slow curve to me was what a piano had been to Mozart, a rifle to Davy Crockett, a tank to George Patton. The Griffin catcher dug in, and I delivered that tanta- lizing dipsy-do of mine. Are you familiar with the term "hanging Mine not only hung, it ally stopped directly over! plate and waited for Griffin catcher to hit it. After the game, which had lost 6-3, I fielder, "Did you have chance to catch that ball! Griffin catcher hit?" He said, "No, but I I manage to get a brief at it as it was leavin et." SO, no offers of a sional contract or a baseball scholarship forthcoming, but I still my dream of bein writer. At least you sweat as much up box as you did down field actually playing game. BY SPECIAL WITH HIS DEDRA, ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE I GRIZZARD, WHO GREW BY MORELAND, AND BECAMe' MOST WIDELY READ PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BooK AND MUSIC STORES WIDE. What's True: Science, History or What should we hold to as absolute truth? Should our children be led to believe the Bible is right so long as it agrees with their science and history textbooks? Is evolution a valid scien- tific conclusion but creation only a feeble explanation offered by ignorant Christians? In our world today we often hear of so called intel- lectuals, scholars and experts who try to explain away the Bible as something tha! could not possibly be true. There are those who may go so far to acknowledge the Bible as a religious guide but not trustworthy in other more scholarly areas. I will be the first to admit that the Bible is not a science book, howev- er, I do contend that the sci- ence found in the Bible is absolutely and perfectly accurate. The Bible is not a history book as such, but the history found therein is absolutely and positively correct. The Bible is a history book in that it gives us His story. We must understand that the Word of God should he our absolute authority. Even in the "intellectual" world of science, the Bible is the final authority. From the word of Cod we can find several instances where the Bible stated true scientific fact while the pop- ular scientific opinion of the day stated something else. We all have studied in school that Columbus believed he could reach the east by sailing west. There were some that actu- ally believed he would go so far and fall off the edge of the Earth because it was flat. LONG BEFORE the mod- ern scientific community actually discovered the Earth was round, the Bible record- ed in Isaiah 40:22, "It is he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth..." Would you believe it if someone came up to you and said the Earth rested upon the back of a giant turtle? In ancient mythology some actually believed that the Earth was resting upon the shoulders of a strong man. We know today that is a silly myth, but long before scien- tists discovered the earth was suspended in space, the Bible had already said in Job 26:7, "He stretcheth out the north over the empty place, and hangeth the earth upon noth- ing." Have you ever looked up in a clear cold night sky and gazed at the stars? Scientists from long ago did just that and believed they could num- ber them. It is recorded in scientif- ic history that men gave all kinds of estimates as to their number. Those numbers var- ied from about 1000 and up. If they had only read the Bible, they would find as we know today that the stars are without number. Jeremiah 33:22 says, "As the hosts of Heaven cannot be num- bered..." I mentioned all that just to say this: the Bible is his- torically and scientifically accurate. When our children come home from school, parents should take enough interest in their children to sit down and find out what they are being taught. Our children must come to realize that they can always trust what the Word of God says. If the Bible and the science book dis- agree, teach them the Bible is correct and the book is wrong. Instead judging the Bible by the s ence book, judge the book by the Bible. IF WE hold to any Word of God as accurate, must accept of God as accurate. It for man to pick and what he is to believe the Bible. It is all right cannot believe any of I Submit to and the proofs of its cy, is indeed without error or contradiction. not claim to but I believe it. To these may think that foolish, let J ask you this q understand how all, motbile works, or brain functions? not, but you do believe automobile will take where you need to your brain will keep the of your body doing should. The point is that because we may not stand all of something, n't make one cising faith in somethingi if comes down to the book, the Bible, I will every time! Why don't 50 Years Ago.., In the Hogansville Herald Predecessor tothe Hogansvifle Home I GREEN WAVE ROLLING - biggest news in the Sept. 17, 1 Hogansville Herald was the opening the Green Wave Football Hogansville would host the Jackson Devils in a much-anticipated home op er. NEW.PLACE FOR AN: OUT- It was big news ithe Legion dining to the public. In addition newspaper ran three aic, Jes about throughout the paper. Sea, fd were one of the big features. WOWl NEW TECHNOLOGY- Royal Theatre ran a big ad.touting 'Three-Dimensional" 'Fort Ti' Other offerings at the cinema that included Betty Grable in 'The Takes a Wife' and 'Night prices were 65 cents and evening ets sold for 75 cents. Kids could anytime for 35 cents. 1953 BARGAINS- Penny advertised two pounds of green peas 25 cents and baby beef steak for per pound. Guy's had "beautiful new dresses" for $7.98 and $9.95. WANT AD WONDERS-, ad sought fortune-seeking who could earn the sum of $4 or more call a LaGrange phone number.