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Manchester, Georgia
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September 23, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
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September 23, 1999
 

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OPINION l PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - SEPTEMBER 16, 1999 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS . (rintr uhliatimt Millard B. Grimes, President USPS 620-040 Mu HALE PUBI.ISI tER]ADVFRTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKENDALL flL.;SOC I ATE PUBLISHER/EDITOR MAroON (TED) SMITH MANAGING EDtTORr['ECHNICAL DIRECTOR LFJFkN'N WlLBERT B USINI'kSS M,NA(;ER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O, Box 426 1 ]ngansville, Georgia 30230 ()ffi'ud l cg d (h?eat (" 3. l/foa sv Ih' An Old Friend "We had a seven point lead and there wasn't that much time left on the clock. They scored and should have just settled for a tie, but went for the two-point conversion. When that little bowl- ing ball fullback caught the screen pass it made me the last man between him and the goal line.I got my hands on him but he dragged me into the end zone. Wish I knew who that guy was." About that time there was a knock on my door and a yell. "Dale, are you in there? Let's go to supper." I said,'Nould you like to meet the bowling bail?" My friend from Manchester, and now fellow freshman at West Georgia College, said, "Yes, I def- initely would." I called out, "Come on in, the door's open." It swung wide and there stood all five feet eight inches of Noel Houston: I said, "Noel meet the last guy to lay a hand on you before Hogansville went to the state championship with Washington Wilkes." We got to supper late that evening, after Noel and my buddy from Manchester had old home week and made a lasting friendship. My friendship with Noel started long before he became the first string fullback. We grew up in the same neigh- borhood. I remember going to play at his uncle's and aunt's house on Askew Avenue, where he grew up. He lived there until he went off to the Navy in about 1967. Our neighborhood gang also included Don Conway, Butch Hight and Butch's cousin, Danny Garrison.There was also Linda Payne and Jane Todd, who occa- sionally graced our presence when we let girls play. The gang remained friends throughout high school, and for Noel and me, into college. My mother con- stantly haggled me to practice Noel's study habits at West Georgia; he made the Dean's List every quarter except the last one he attended. I don't know why Noel suddenly decided to leave school and join the Navy. I received several letters from him while he was in training and we saw each other when he was home on leave, but after he got out and I graduated we went our separate ways. I have some fond memories of my college years, and Noel fig- ures prominently into them. We pulled a couple of pranks, which I may have already told you about, but are worth repeating. Noel, in spite of his overly seri- ous and reserved nature, was a jokester at heart. Once he and I decided to fool a very naive fel- low dorm-mate at West Georgia College. For reasons I can't remember now, we were stuck in Carrollton over a weekend. If there was ever a place to be bored out of your skull, it was at West Jim Dale Columnist Georgia over a weekend. Suitcase school was an under- statement for that place in the '60s. The locals were more hos- tile to us college kids than the Indians were to Custer, so we stayed on campus looking for Ways to entertain ourselves. Bentley was nearly to the dorm when Noel and I concoct- ed our-plan. When Bentley opened the door to the third floor he was just in time to hear threat- erring remarks directed towards me from a very irate Noel; and then a knife appeared, and then blood on my T-shirt, and then I fell to the floor in great pain. Noel threw the knife down and ran down the hallway toward the "opposite door from where Bentley stood. Before we could catch him to tell him the knife was rubber and the blood Was McDonald's ketchup,' Bentley had apprehended a campus policeman. An unsuspecting dorm occupant- had picked me" ' up to take me to his roorfi for first aid and two more had wrestled Noel to the floor. Needless to say we had some explaining to do. The second situation involved TerreU Parham's noto- rious "birthday parties." The HogansviUeaaGrange crowd at West Georgia never missed a birthday ceremony for its mem- bers, which I won't elaborate on here. Everyingle one of us was wary on our birthdays of what might happen before the sun went down, and I might add, after, too. It was getting a little dark and I made it through the day without incident. That evening as Noel and I walked back from supper I mentioned to him that I thought that maybe they had forgotten my birthday. When we reached the walkwayto the dorm I considered myself safe. Then I opened the door to see about five of my "friends" waiting to escort me to my room for my 20th birthday celebration. The last word from Terrell was, "Good job bringing him home, Houston." I guess many of you are aware that Noel recently suc- cumbed to a heart attack. I can only remember him being completely healthy and alive. But, if I know Noel, and I do, he is probably sitting up there grinning, with that quiet smile that always makes one wonder if he knows something he isn't telling. Tin; H(t; xs tt.t.t: Htxtr: NEs is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing ('ompany. a division of Grimes Publications. -'1' 3051 Rtx)sevelt Highway, Manchester, Gc,,rgia 31316. USPS b21)-(M0. Subscription rates by mail: $15 in Meriwether, Talbot or Harris Counties: $21) a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage pard at Hogansvflle, Georgia 30230. Fou st ascmPt tos call 1706 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P O. Box 426. Manchester. Georgia 31816 POS'I'M .s'rt:R: Send address changes to E O. Box 426. Hogansvi|le. GA )230. S'rFF Publisher and Advertising Director ..................................................................... Mike Hale Associmc Publisher mid [itor ................................................................. John Kuykendall Managing Editor and Technic',fl Director ........................................... Marion ,Ted} Smith Business Manager ....................................................................................... LeeAnn Wilbert Asst.'iate Fxiitors .......................... Billy Bo'ant/ralbotton. Michael Sniderttiams County Bryan Geter/Hogansville. Caroline Yeager/Greenville. Lee N. Howell Staff Writer .......................................................................................................... J. Dan Stout Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Ph(aography ................................................................................................. Michael Snider Composing ................................................................................... Valinda Ivery, Don Green Leg'Ms ............................................................................................................... Valinda lvery Receptionist and Classlticds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Pressnxmi .................................................................. David Boggs, Wayne Grochowski C()R|'()R VI'F: ()FFI('ERN President ......................................................................................................... Millard Grimes Vice President ...................................................................................... Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura Grunes Corer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garretl Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ..................................................... James S. Grimes Might Be Time to Return to the Draft "Be all that you can be" has been a popular jingle used by the U.S. Army as a slogan to attract new enlistments for the past eighteen years. Now, officials are consid- ering whether or not it is the right slogan for today's 18 to 24-year olds. With a new century approaching, the military's largest branch is looking for ways to fill its depleted ranks. This year's enlistment goal of 74,500 new recruits is expected to fall at least 7,000 short in the worst recruiting year since 1979. Not that slogans necessar- ily make advertising effec- tive, Advertising Age Magazine ranked "Be all that you can be" the number two jingle of the century, behind McDonald's, "You deserve a break today." Roland Rust, professor of advertising at Vanderbilt University, said the Army slo- You Get It gan rivals Nike's "Just Do It" for staying power. However, he added "You have to ask whether Generation X is wanting to be all it can be." The Army plans to spend at least $92 million on an ad campaign next year in an effort to enlist 80,000 new sol- diers. If this number is enlisted the cost per new soldier for advertising will be $1,180 each. Other new approaches will be sending younger soldiers to work in recruiting offices and giving new recruits leave after basic training to talk with their friends back home about their Army experience. While the Army may keep their famous slogan "Be all you can be," future ads may appeal to the patriotic spirit of our young people, as well as the opportunity for self- improvement. Former Publisher Let's talk for a minute about patriotic spirit. Without a doubt, serving in the mili- tary will make one more patri- otic. That is one reason the draft made sense to me. Those of able body and mind should have no problem giving two years of their life to serve this country. Many people have given much more than that. Personally, I feel the draft gave the Army a better pool of soldiers. You got the farm lads, the big city guys, the doctors, By Ray King ! .' lawyers, chiefs or just plain old bottle Everyone had to serve so field of talent was as new soldiers, more ed and mature. Some Army officials a "partial draft," that is, will probably be ed to sustain the future taw. Others say a return to a draft is unlikely. They say the public won't support it short of a major war. There are some rather thorny issues out there eerning the draft. Issues like draftin to concerns of fairness. due to reforms in the type recruits the military takes, a segment of society would be automatically excluded the draft unless the were lifted. The United States ended the draft in 1973 and the all volunteer force at end of the Vietnam War. Since then an entire eration has been raised with- out mandatory service. Abe Lincoln once said, "When you have got an ele" phant by the hind legs and is trying to run away, it is best t*.t him run." Maybe the Army has aOi elephant by the hind legs trying to maintain an all unteer force. Maybe they should turn the elephant loose and go back to a fair and reasonable that will keep our Army viable and well stocked with quali- fied men and women. Some say the military roots are deep as a voluntary force. I'm not sure that is correct. Seems the military root go back to the two big Wars, Korea arC-Vietnam, those periods in when a draft supplied qualified and patriotic men and women who fou and served "voluntarily" keep our nation free. The Roosevelts and Southern Ways Eleanor Roosevelt began asking questions about the plight of black Georgians in the card riding from the train sta- tion to the Hart cottage the first night the Roosevelts arrived in Warm Springs. She never stopped, accord- ing to local memories. Fifty years later-30 years after Roosevelt's death-some elderly local white ladies recalled Eleanor's visits to the area with something less than affection. The wife of a leading Manchester merchant of the 1920s and 1930s summed it up most succinctly. "We didn't like her a bit," she said softly in an interview. She paused and gazed down the residential street as if she were gazing back through time. She sighed and said with feel- ing but not bitterness, "She ruined every maid we ever had." What Roosevelt did do from the beginning was challenge his Georgia friends', views on a somewhat related issue-that of anti-Catholicism. In a circumspect and neigh- borly way, of course. In the spring of 192S, on his second visit to Warm Springs, Roosevelt becam e a temporary newspaper columnist. Tom Loyless wrote for the Macon Telegraph. He was ill, and hard-pressed in his efforts to make improve- ments on the Meriwether Inn that spring. He asked Roosevelt to pitch hit for him. Roosevelt wrote nine columns. One was titled, "We Lack a Sense of Humor If We Forget That Not So Very Long Ago We Were Immigrants Ourselves." If was a gentle rebuke to nativist notions. He wrote that "a certain agricuRural county in a Northern state with which I am very familiar" had prided itself on its English, Scotch and Dutch bloodlines. He said the county became quite backward until south German and then northern Italian "peasants" moved in and led the way to prosperity. "Don't forget that some of the most backward and ignorant sections of the United States in the Northern and Southern states are populated almost exclusively with the so-called 'pure American stock.'" Roosevelt also took it upon himself to campaign among his Georgia neighbors for AI Smith for President-in particular-and the civil rights of Catholics in general. Roosevelt liked to tell this stow about his campaign. "One morning, when I was sound asleep, it was around day- light, about five o'[clock, some- body banged on the shutters. .So I got into a little wheelchair and went over and opened the shutters and there was an old gentleman from over in Shiloh Valley. "He said, 'Mr. Roosevelt. .we are all upset about you.. .We people over in Shiloh Valley, we are sort of old-fash- ioned and we believe the writ- ten word) "And I said, 'Yes, and what happened?' "'Well, the preacher on Sunday, after church, he gave us a lot of handbills...(and) if what those handbills say is true, we don't see how you can be supporting this fellow Smith.' "I said, 'Why not?'" The man from Shiloh Valley showed Roosevelt the handbill, which said that since the Roman Catholic Church only recognized Catholic marriages and baptism, if Smith became The Squire of Warm Springs By Theo President, all Protestant mar- riages would become adulter- ous relationships and all chil- dren born to them would become illegitimate. "I said, 'I think I am 1 am legally married to my wife even if Smith has been governor of New York for eight years...I have got five pretty husky kids and I have every reason to believe they are legitimate." Smith lost several southern states, but did carry Georgia, including Meriwether County. The day when a farmer could sneak up to Roosevelt's shuttered bedroom window in the hours before dawn would soon come to an end. So would the day when he could drive his hand-controlled Ford around on educational trips for conversations with his neighbors. But for the three years after he began driving and before he was elected Governor, he had such freedom. Even after he was elected Governor, he found spare hours to pay such visits. A farmer with land to sell in the years 1929 to 1932 might not have been surprised to see the new Model A drive into his front yard, with Roosevelt at the wheel, tieless, collar open, shirt sleeves rolled above his elbows, unaccompanied by any police guards. Roosevelt would ask him about the land, perhaps haggle a bit. His main concern on suc occasions, and there were seV- eral, was not to purchase land' He usually turned the of that over to agents-a local lawyer or the manager of the farm he bought in 1927. His main concern was, Mrs. Killian put it, to get to know his neighbors. He may not have every white man in the countY, but he got to know many them, and he got to know everY type, economically and social" ly speaking. Until 1932, he seemed get- uinely at ease with them, and they seemed genuinely at ease with him. He became a celebrity nationally and locally in 1928, after winning the New Yorl Governorship. One-thousand people were at the train station in Wars Springs to greet him when he arrived two days after the dec" tion. No such welcome had ever been seen at any visit or horn e coming there before. The town's population was under 1,000; the county's was 22,000 (about what it is in 1999). Though he met a fe Georgians he had not met before (local political leaders, including Sheriff J.B. Jarrell, gave a party for him), he noticed that his celebrity and his security needs began to intrude. Motel A visits now includ" ed bodyguards Gus GeneneriCh or Earl Miller along for proteC" tion. Solo trips were exceptionS" Otis Moore, who worked o.0 Roosevelt's farm in that pert od (he would later manage it) recalled several occasiot:S when Roosevelt did drive ug alone and explained, "I slipped away from 'em, Oat."