"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
September 23, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
September 23, 2004
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




p Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS uSPS e20-o4o Jom~ K~ALL PUBIJSHER/EDrrOR LAURm LEWIS ADVZRTm~G Drive'tim CLAYBROOK ASSOCmTt~ EDrrOR ROB Rl~ ASSaSrANT EDrroR ~ou Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansvi~, Georgia 30230 A Traveling Out of the i Country? Be Aware! Last week I took a trip to Mexico to visit with my son- in-law's family and help cel- ebrate my grandson's birth- day. It was a great trip and I really enjoyed it. Returning home however, was an expe- rience I won't soon forget. Let me start off by telling you a tittle about the trip. Airport security is tight now and I had to be at tim air- port two hours before my flight was scheduled to leave. That is a little aggravating, having to take off your shoes, empty your pockets and go through security is trouble- some, but a necessary evil. I understand that and agree with the tight security. So, I have no beef with any of the security measures taken. Anyway, after making it through security and a short wait, the plane was airborne and on its way to Houston. Once in Houston I decid- ed to take a walk outside since I had about a two hour lay over. Here we go, all the secu- rity measures again. Of course, I was understanding. Finally, the plane is on its way to Mexico. The plane touched down right on time. I visited Torreon and it is beautiful country. The moun- tains are huge and vivid in color. T0rreon itself is a very large cityand very industri- alized. The cityhas a Walmart, McDonalds, and all the other conveniences of America. It also has the outside shops and all the things that makes it Mexico. Simply put, a won- derful place. My son-in-law's family was wonderful. You could not ask for better hospitality. We were also there right around Independence Day for Mexico. I've heard so much about Mexican cele- brations and have always wanted to see one first band. The Mexican people love to dance and are very good at it, that is one thing I did learn. I really hated to leave after only four days. There through immigration and people were a little dis- traugh~ I realized then, for the first time, just how our rights as a US citizen have changed due to terrorism. Even though I had a valid drivers license, a social secu- rity card and a birth certifi- cate, it was not worth a dime unless the computer told the Immigration Department that I was in fact a US citizen. Then an announcement came across the intercom sys- tem informing everyone that ff they made derogatory com- ments, they would be detained and possibly jailed. In my book, that went a little too far. As I understand it, we still live in a free 'country with rights. One of those rights is freedom of speecl~ It is aright our ancestors fought and died for. After all, as a newspaper person, I feel it is one of the most important rights. Without freedom of speech wecan not express ourselves and we can not speak out against things that are impor- tant to us or affect our lives. I was upset a bit by that announcement and I assure you I let everyone around me know that I didn~ like it. I WILLBE the first to say that sometimes people can be crnel and say things they shouldn't, but that does not mean we take the right away from them. It is up to theindi- vidual to determine ff what they have to say is imlxa'tant enough to say it. If they say something stupid, then peo- ple around them know it, but they should be allowed to say ~re so .many things I did ndt~ whatever they choose, when- ve a chance to see or do. ",~ ever they choose. Regrettably, I had to board ,, Threatening to throw the plane though and head for /Wmeone in jail for saying home. sdmething you don't like pret- THAT IS WHEN things started to go a little crazy. Upon arriving in Houston, we were taken off the plane, loaded onto a bus and taken to ~tion and Customs. It was a mad house. Immigration was having computer problems and citi- zens re-entering the country were lined up like cattle wait- ing for approval to make their way through the airport and onto the next plane, or home, or wherever they were head- ed. It took a long time to go ty much borders on commu- nism to me. We already canl pray in our schools or gov- ernmental facilities. That is my freedom of expression and religion I believe. So, I'm one of those hard headed people that believe in my constitutional rights. Unfortunately, when they are challenged, l'm going to speak out, and I did. Luckily, I was not jailed and here I am writing my col- umn for another week. By the way, Which is freedom of speech I believe. THE HOG~ ~ NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mc~ury Publishing Company, a division ~Gdmes ~ at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620.040. Subscription rates by marl: $20 in Troup. Harris or Meriwet.her Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FoR ~ call (706) 846-31~ or write to Circulation Manage, Star R O. Box 426. Publications, Manchester, Georgia 3181 ~ Pvsruasrsa: Send address chenges toP. O. BOx 426, Hogamvi~ GA 3023O. SrA~ Publisher and Editlx ........................................................................ :..Jolm Kukyendall Ad~g Director ................................................................................. ~ lewis Editor ................................................................................... Clint Chybrook Assistant Editor ..................................................................................... Rob Rictmrds(m Staff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Getcr. Billy Bryant ~oa .............................. Dewayne Rowers. Robcrt Wcems, ~ Youngblood Circulation Manager.. ......................................................................... Trac~ ~ Wyau Press Manager ................................................................................. Wayne Pressroom Assistants ..................................... Zaddie Dixon,Damell McCauicy IV~lnxan Distribution ............................................................................... David Boggs COaPOaA~Z Oma~z~ President. ............................................................................................ Millard B. Grimes Vice Presidcnt .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ....................................... .Laura Grimes Cofer Trc-~m~r ...................................................................................... Kalhy Csirr~s Gamin 12gal Counsel and Assistant S~mm~ry ............................................. ~ S. Grimes a~ ~t PAGE 4-A - HOGANSVIIJJ~ HOME N~'>s -~HURSDAY, SEPT. 23, 2004 Lewis Goes to College, Still Loves My first two years at the University of Georgia passed quickly. I pledged Sigma Pi fraternity in the fall of my freshman year. I was initiat- ed in the middle of winter quarter, and they showed me the secret handshake. There was a coed here and there, but again nobody who could make me forget Paula in Atlanta. Her modeling career was moving rapidly. She wore new makeup and new clothes, and there was an air of sophistication to her now. She also had become a blonde. I liked the new color of her hair. I would catch myself twirling it between my fingers as I had my moth- er's. "Why do you always do my hair that way?" she would ask me, "Feels good in my fin- gers," I would lie. I WASN't ABOUT to tell her I toyed with her hair because I used to do my mother's hair the same way. Never compare a woman to your mother in any way. This is especially true in the area of food. You tell a woman you don~ like the way she cooked your eggs. "What's wrong with the way I cooked your eggs?" she will reply. 'They just don't taste right," you continue. "And my mother's eggs never ran all over the plate like these." The next sound you hear will be angry screams. The rule is, even if your eggs are running all over the plate when your mother's didn't, eat them anyway. Your moth- er wouldn't hit you over the head with a frying pan, eitb_er, but don't be too sure about a woman who has just finished second in an egg-cooking con- test with some ungrateful klutz's mother. I SAW PAULA on most weekends. Either I would drive over to Atlanta, or she would visit me in Athens at the university. The Sigma Pi spring outing was scheduled in Atlanta my freshman year. We had Jerry Butler for the Saturday night formal at Atlanta Cabana. In the afternoon, we all gathered in one of the broth- er's rooms and began to drinlc Paula bad never been much of a drinker. Miss Inez, her mother, had instilled a fear of the evils of alcohol in her, but she'd been away from home for a time, and so she gunned down the Jack Black and Coke with the rest of us. She got so smashed she gave one of my fraternity brothers the secret handshake I had shown her in a moment of weakness several weeks earlier. "We'll bring this up at the next chapter meeting," said the brother. Before the dance, we all dressed and went out for din- ner. Paula wore a long white dress that somebody else's date had helped her get into. She was barely coherent at this point from the many Jack Black and Cokes. At dinner, she ordered spaghetti with meatballs. A few moments after it was placed before her, she went down into the spaghetti head first. "What are you doing?" I asked her. "Taking a little nap," she said, spaghetti covering her face and dripping onto her white dress. I managed to I out of her dinner, waiter brought a wipe the took her back to her tening and dancing Buffer, and I helped of her clothes. She nestled into ing her aching head, memories crept back, 1 ories from my felt good holding a that way. It made strong. It made me could depend on me feel I never wanted far away from her BY wrrH HIS WIDOW, ~D coLUMNS GRI2ZARD, WH~ BY MORELAND, AND BECA~1 MOST WlD~Y READ wRrrER OIF HIS TIMF. ERODUCIIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-12~ BOOK AND MUSIC STORES Reminiscing About Fred's Coffee year. In May 1959 we began operation of the Veneer Mill and did so for thirty years, until we sold the business in 1989. Fred Serf and I remained close friendsduringtheyears that followed. Later he changed the name of his Candy Cane to the Snack Shack. Some time later Fred purchased the Village Inn uptown on Broad Street where he operated a restau- rant for a number of years. I was sorry to learn that my friend, Fred Self, passed away last Friday after I had known him for almost fifty years. Before I ever moved to Manchester I got to know Fred when he was operating the Candy Cane Restaurant on Fifth Avenue. His was a favorite place for me to eat whiled was buying logs in this area. - I came to Manchester in 1958 looking for the late Eugene Braddy. I dropped by to see Fred and asked if he knew where I might find Gene~ I used Fred's telephone and set up an appointment the next day with him and his son, Earnest. This led to my purchas- ing property in Manchester where we constructed the Veneer Mill the following I was eating breakfast, the Goodman plant was just installing their new plant. Fred was preparing some of the management personnel's breakfast in the back, as was his usual procedure. After I finished eating, I went to the cash register and rung up the proper amount for my breakfast and started out the front door. This was FRED WOULD open his restaurant about 5:30 every morning. I would go by and he would fix my breakfast every morning because I was always an early riser and Fred always knew exactly what I wanted to eat every morning. Early one morning while 50 Years Ago... nothing unusual for because I knew Fred busy, and I l cost of my meal. I learned later Goodman management pie was H. Goodman Russo say in a low "That fellow must own interest in this cafe I mice him register and I looked over at the men and answered, don't have an interest in business, I just get fast much cheaper by ing my own change." Fred and I laughs about this through the years. We miss Fred and will miss his Manchester Club of days gone by. Inthe Hogansville Herald ~tothe tto~te ttome New~ THANKS, UTTLE GUYS, of the more interesting items front paga of Sept 23, l-logan~e Heald was a of Kids' Day. "Tha mwarmOub~obseve Wods Day Saturday, Ibis ~ad year the local soredl a mov Roy Thoa and also have ice cream. page photo showed the tive ~lle High cheerleaders, who are go into fuU wing to root tho Wave to victory against Park? ~ofthe team wee Sy~,a Evans, JoAnn Madon Hendfix, Ids eau Stone, Lyrm Smith ar~l Joyce Evans. wmr )NmmS sale: One kitchen sink, in condmon. SS." ~C~llEMA TIME. Movies ing at the Theatre Danny Kaye "the Sun Shines Bright," "Garden of Evils" and one would be remembered after the others were long "the Wild One," stardng Brando. Motor Company had a variety vinlage cars for sale: a ~51 tudor Powerglide for $895, a '49 a '46 Chevrolet Tudor for and a '4e Coupe $2S0.