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Manchester, Georgia
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September 29, 2005     The Hogansville Herald
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September 29, 2005
 

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Opinions &amp; Ideas PAGE 4-A - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - THURSDAY, SEPT. 29, 2005 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 L A (fime tJuhltathm Miilard B. Grimes, President JOHN KUYKENDAI PUBLISHER]EDITOR LAUmE LEWIS ADVERTISING DIRECTOR CLINT CLAYBROOK ASSOCIATE EDITOR ROB ICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansvflle, Georgia 30330 Horror Movies May Be Damaging to Youngsters It's been years ago, but during my younger days there were three movies that actually frightened me, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Psycho and The Exorcist. For weeks after watching "The Exorcist" I saw the image of the young woman's heading turning around, how her face looked, all of that. Movies like Dracula and The Creature from the Black Lagoon never bothered me much. So, I learned to pick and choose the horror flicks I watched. The truth is, we all like to be frightened once in a while. I think it's probably good for us. It gets the adrenaline pumping. I like to watch a horror movie once in a while, but I don't watch them as much as I once did. The reason is a simple one, in recent years horror movies have become more violent and very graphic. We can give thanks to the improvements of special effects for this. In today's movies we can view the details of torture or brutali- ty in slow, agonizing close- ups. Some of the recent hor- ror movies have included scenes that have shown heads being chopped off, a brain being blown up, the disfig' urement ofa face wth a knife, a neck being slashed, a hypodermic needle being plunged into an eyeball. Unfortunately, that type of violence is not just held to movies, it can also be viewed on television and the video games that can be purchased today for children. My grand- son has some video games that are pretty violent and I try to discourage him from playing them. I WAS WATCHING an informational type television show a couple of weeks ago that addressed the issue of how some young children respond to violence in movies. It is important to point out that the show noted that some young children do not have any symptoms after watching violence, but some do. One of the spokesmen on the show noted that some young children that watch violent movies do have some symptoms after watching. Those symptoms included, showing fears at bedtime; having reoccurring night- mares; sometimes a fearful view of the world; but most importantly some problems concentrating and studying. The spokesman also said that children under the age of 12 are probably most at risk for severe reactions from view- ing violent movies, television shows or video games. While the spokesman pointed out that there has been no proof that viewing violent movies or playing vio- lent video games can affect children, he pointed out that research shows that televi- sion does affect children's behavior. He also said that children are most threatenedby movie villains who seem-real and play on their deepest fears, for example, surprise attacks, kidnappings, torture or death. "Some of the villains are portrayed as being almost indestructible and leave the children feeling they would be helpless should something like this happen to them," the spokesman said. "Children feel that if such violence can happen on a movie or televi- sion screen, then they reason that it could happen to them that night." AS I THOUGHT about the information, I realized that children may be more affected by the violent con- tent than the experts may know. While I'm not a researcher or psychiatrist or even a medical doctor, I do have pretty good common sense and would have to say there is not one parent that would approve of a child being allowed to view an R- rated movie. Of course, you don't have to be a psychia- trist to know that viewing graphic violence in movies, which is much more power- ful than anything on televi- sion, is harmful to children. OUR CHILDREN really do react to television and movies. As a parent and grandparent, I've watched as my children and grandchil- dren attempt to re-enact moments from movies, try to dress like the characters and even act like them. You can purchase "Power Ranger" costumes, weapons and any- thing your mind can imagine. Why? Because your kids want them and the companies know you will buy it. The kids want it, because they want to be like the hero. The bottom line is, we have to be the ones to protect our children's minds and the only way to do that is through the use of good common sense, If there is something in the movie that we think might frighten them or have an effect on them, then just don't let them watch it. THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications. E O. Box 426. Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville, GA 30230. STA Publisher and Editor. ........................................................................... John Kukyendall Advertising Director .................................................................................. Laurie Lewis Associate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Claybrook Assistant Editor ..................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff" Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryan! Composition .............................. Dewayne Flowers. Robert Weems. Gari Youngblood Circulation Manager. .......................................................................... Tracy Lynn Wyatt Press Manager. ................................................................................ Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................................... Zaddie Dixon.Darnell McCauley Circulation Distribution .............................................................................. David Boggs CORPORATE OFFICERS President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes The Best Skill He Ever Learned My basketball coach, Mr. Sheets, taught typing. I'd seen enough newspaper movies (Bogart's Deadline USA and Jack Webb's 30 to name a cou- ple), to know you had to be able to type if you wanted to write for a newspaper. Writing things out longhand becomes painful after a time, and I didn't have a particular- ly attractive handwriting style in the first place. Mr. Sheets would not allow the two-finger hunt-and-peck system, so I learned the tech- nique where you put the fin- gers of your left hand on asdf and the fingers on your right hand on jkl; and went from there. It was surprisingly easy. The first thing I could type fast without making an error was: "Now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of their country." (I didn't make. a mistake Just now, near- ly 30 years later, either.) I also learned to compose on a typewriter. A lot of peo- ple learn to type so they can get a job typing what other people have written down longhand. I learned to type so I could sit down and compose. OF COURSE, Mr. Sheets did insist that I copy a few things on the typewriter and not make any mistakes. He'd give tests in that. I did okay, but I've never been the neat- est of typers. And, just as I figured it would, it worked out that if you write for a news- paper, you can be as messy as you want to be with your typ- ing. When you make a mistake while writing your story, you can simply crossover the mis- take with a bunch of x's. In those days, when you were on the road, you would send your stories back to the newspaper by Western Union, "Aunt Emily is giving you and Western Union sent back Uncle Frank's typewriter, and every word in all caps, no mat- you should be grateful enough ter how you typed it. That meant you could type your entire, story in lower case, since it would still be sent back in all caps. That saved a lot of time and energy, too. By the end of the year I had composing on a classroom typewriter down right, and my mother found out my Aunt Emily, on my father's side, had a typewriter that belonged to her late husband, my Uncle Frank. She called Aunt Emily and asked if I could have it. AUNT EMILY agreed, as long as we would come over to her house to pick it up. I was reluctant to go, because my Aunt Emily was a little strange. She talked quite fast and had once been a fortune teller-or witch, I forget which- and I was afraid she would put some sort of hex or curse on me. Also, Aunt Emily's daugh- ter, Cousin Helen, was much younger than I was, but the last time I had seen her, she had.kicked me on the shin. to at least go ride over with me to pick it up," said my moth- er. "But what happens if Helen kicks me in the shin?" I asked. "You're afraid of a nine- year old girl?" my mother asked back. I DIDN'T SAY anything else and, somewhat ashamed, got into the car. When we arrived at Aunt Emily's she suggested Helen take me out- side to see their new horse. I had no interest whatsoever in seeing a horse, but my moth- er cut me one of those looks that said, "Get out there with Helen and see that horse. NOW." We were looking at a horse, Helen and I, when she snuck behind me and poured a bucket of water she'd found in the stall all over my head. It didn't just stay on my head, of course; it dripped down the rest of me. I attempted to catch Helen and feed her to the horse, but :t she ran inside and said, "Mama, make Lewis stop chas- hag me!" Great, I thought. Not only is my mother going to get :i mad at me, but here's where i Aunt Emily gives out the : curse. I did explain why I was :: chasing Helen, of course, and the fact I was drenched in water from head to foot gave my story a great deal of cred- ibility. :: "You shouldn't pour water : on your cousin," Aunt Emily said to Helen. "Oh, he'll dry out," said my : mother, thinking, I'm sure, What am I raising here? A young man who can't deal with a nine-year old girl cousin? Many years later when I got divorced for the third time, my mother said, "Your troubles with women may have started with your Cousin Helen." ...to be continued next week BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, THE HOME NEWS IS CARRYING SELECT- ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE LEWIS GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN NEAR- BY MORELAND, AND BECAME THE MOST WIDELY READ GEORGIA WRITER OF HIS TIME. GRIZZARD'S BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL AVAIL- ABLEFOR SALE THROUGHBAD BOOT PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX 191266, ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND AT BOOK AND MUSIC STORES NATION- WIDE. 22% More Than in 2004..'Taxes, That Is You dearly beloved coun- ty taxpayers should have your tax bills by now, and I trust you have found time to open them. If you have not you should, because you could be in for a big shock. Let me just go ahead and feli 3/biahiJw, b  ff'U havefft opened your county tax bill maybe the shock will be some- what less when you do. Come December when you pay your 2005 taxes you will pay 22 per- cent more than 2004. Stay with me for a while and allow me to explain to you who caused the large tax increase. You can blame your elect- ed school board for a 10 per- cent increase, and you can blame three of your elected county commissioners for a 43 percent increase. Those three officials should be known by you and they are as follows: Emmett Clark, Bobby Moreland and Chairman Nancy Jones. Charles Neely and Frank Buce voted no. them go to the public school system and 43 percent go to the county. With the school board's tax increase less this year percentage wise than the county's, and their percent- age of total taxes being con- siderably larger ithan the county's, it brings'the total increase back to the 22 per- cent. Our school board says the main reason for their tax increase is due to less fund- ing from the state than they have been receiving. My coun- ty commissioner tells me that the large majority of the coun- ty tax increase was due to new spending, and that if the new spending had not been added, the increase could have been much smaller. GREENBOW, the compa- ny who wishes to put a land- fill in Northwest Meriwether County, continues to suggest to our county citizens through full page newspaper ads in our local papers, that if the land- fill were built the large tax increase by the county would not be necessary. From what I understand, the three county commission- ers who voted for the large tax increase seemed to favor the landfill until a large citi- zens group was formed in opposition to it. AFTER MANY YEARS of observing politicians, I have learned to become suspicious of some of them, and the actions of these three com- missioners only substantiate my suspicions. Twenty two percent more than 2004 (43 percent more from ,the county's standpoint) could have been avoided if we had allowed metro Atlanta to dump their trash in our coun- ty, could be their thoughts. Not many businesses I know of could get by with a 43 percent spending increase placed into their budgets. No business I know of can BOTTOM LINE: we will pay 22 percent more than 2004, and there is nothing we can do about it right now. Please remember who caused these huge tax increas- es because you hopefully will have an opportunity to do something about it at the bal- lot box. 50 Years Ago mmm In the Hogansville Herald Predecessor tothe Hogansville Home News IMPORTANT VISIT - The Sept. 29, 1955 Hogansville Herald was all abuzz about the impending visit of a congressman. "Congressman John J. 'Jack' Fiynt of the fourth district will be the speaker here next Sunday at a meeting of the Brotherhood of the Antioch Baptist Church to be held in the church auditorium on Blue Creek Road. Mr. Flynt has just returned to his home in Griffin after spending several days in Washington." .RINGING AGAIN -"The congregation of First Methodist resurrected their old church bell, which had been lying silent for several years." Church members mounted the bell on "two tall substantial power poles, and "musical notes were sent thundering across the valley." *CINEMATIME- Movies playing atthe Royal Theatre included "Station West," "A Prize of Gold," "Air Strike," "Escape to Burma," "Last Command" and 'We're No Angels." MEMORIES OF THE PAST - An ad pro- claimed the wonders of the Southeastern Fair in Atlanta. Mentioned were "arts and skills of the southland" but more interest was probably generated by "Grandstand thrills" and "new rides." Other attractions were Dancing Waters and a tractor demon- stration, *WANT AD WONDERS - "Lost: brown and white pointer bird dog. Answers to name Judy." ANOTHER THING you should know about your coun- ty taxes is that 57 percent of ,< expect a 43 percent income increase to offset the spend- ing increase, except maybe for the oil companies. My position over.many years has been one of a fiscal conservative. If you do 'flOt 'lm,Ye the moneythe dbrrt' peitt it, and it is totally unfair to local tax- payers to put a 43 percent increase on them, most of which will go towards added services. When looking at assess- ments on property, it does not take a . certified general appraiser to see that our coun- ty property is assessed at very high values compared to other counties of our economic makeup. Excessive property val- ues are also responsible for excessive higher taxes.