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Manchester, Georgia
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September 30, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
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September 30, 2004
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4-A - HOGANSVII2~ HOME NEWS -~tURSDAY, SEFr. 30, 2004 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS ,usPs s~-o40 JOHN K~ALL PUBLIS~DITOR LAtmm Ia~m~ ADDING DIRECTOR Cu~r CuAvmzooK ~LSSOCIATE EDITOR RoB I~~N ASSLSTANT EDITOR A (6rime~ ~uhl~cathm Mi, ard B. Gdnma, Pr~ddont m.w Phone (706) 8463188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Don't Be Afraid to Live Your Dreams Okay, I admit that I'm get- ting older. Maybe too old to do a lot of the things I used to do and too old to do many of the things I've always dreamed about. If I have a regret in life, that's probably it. That I have not done all the things in life that I've wanted to do. As children, we all dream about the things we want to do when we grow up. Play professional sports, be in a band, become a member of the peace corp or a world renowned doctor or lawyer. You know those dreams, we've all had them. Now that I'm older, I real- ize that many of my child- hood dreams have never become a reality. That is because I did not pursue them.Not because I could not accomplish them. I just never took the time to. For some reason after we receive our education and move forward in life, our dreams become secondary to making a living, raising chil- dren, etc. Life, and the fast pace we live it, becomes more of a day-to-day grind to sur- vive than to chase what was once our dreams. Now, I'm not saying that I haven't fulfilled some of my dreams and goals for life. I have. I'm not saying that I haven't enjoyed life or my life today. That is not the case at all. It simply means there were things in life I wanted to accomplish but never did. AS A YOUNG man, I never gave much thought to such trivial things, like pur- suing my dreams. I always thought there was plenty of time to fulfill each and every one of them. Now that I'm pushing the half a century mark, I think about such "trivial" things more often. There were so many other things that I could have done, should have done, if I'd only time. I'm not writing this col- umn to complain, but more to send a message to all of our young readers out there. The message is a simple one: "Take time for you and your dreams." LIKE I SAID earlier, as a young man or woman we think that we will live forev- er and there is always time. Before we know it the time has slipped away, we're much older and many of our dreams have not been lived. I guess it was a combina- tion of things that made me start thinking about this recently. As I said I'm getting older and more mature and realize that time really does pass quickly, and the family is all grown and on their own now and I have more time on my hands. But I think having to attend a funeral last week- end is what made me really start thinking. As I sat there and listened to the preacher talk about the accomplishments the man had made in his life, I won- deredffthere were things left undone. You know, things he wanted to do but never got around to. "I'm sure there are," I thought to myself. "No one accomplishes everything in life they want or desire to." I made myself a promise in that moment, that I was going to write the column you have just rea& There is a country song out today thatCalks about an older man that leaves his long term career behind to pick a guitar and sing in clubs. The song asks a very pointed taken the time. However, time was always a preciouS, question, "if the man is giv- commodity when I was \ing up his ~vjng or taking younger. Now that I'm older, '~ack his life. I realize that I had plenty of~ ,, Iguesseveryonehasadif- time to accomplish many fe,~nt opinion on the matter, things, I just didn't take the but ~ would have to answer time to do it. As I said, life has been wonderful and exciting. So, I'm happy with the way my life has gone for the most part. J guess it could have been better. I could have made better choices, betteb decisions and not made as many mistakes. But, overall, life has been pretty good. So, I'm not complaining about that at all. I'm simply saying that there were many other things I could have accom- )lished had I only taken the that he was taking back his life. He felt compelled to live out his dream, even ff it was late in life. Now, I'm not talking about doing anything that drastic. I'm simply saying that we should all pursue our dreams when we can. After all, the Bible tells us that we are not promised a tomorrow. So, why not take advantage of today and live your dream. You might just find that you are a happier person for doing so. THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NRWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publicizing Company,a division of~ Publica6o~ at 305 ! Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup. Harris or MeriweZher Cound~: $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodicud postage ~ at ~ville. Georgia 30230.Single copy FoR ~sst~ call (706) 846- 3 i 88 or write to Cmailation Manager. Star Me~ury Public~. E O. Box 426, Manchester, Ge0fgia ~1816. t Posr~t~s-r~a: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, ttegamvill~ GA 30230. Publisher and Editor .......................................................................... ~ Kt~! Advertising Director ................................................................................. .Lau~ Lewis As~ciale Editor ................................................................................... Clint Ciaybrook . Assislanl Editor ................................................................................... ~ob Richardson Stuff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Gezer. Billy Bryant C~4x',sition .............................. Dewayne Flowers. Robert Weems. Gaff Youngblobd Circulation Manager. .............................................................. Tracy Lynn Wyag Press Manager ................................................................................. Wayne Groch~ski Pressroom Assistants ..................................... Zaddie Dixon.Damell McCauley Mailroom DL~ba[ion .... ~ ........ ,~......; ........................................... David Boggs Coal~ Omegas President ........................................ i .................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlo~e S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Sec~ ........................................ Laura Grimes Cofex Treasta-er ........................................................................... :...:._Kathy Csimes Gmve~ Legal C~I and ~ Scer~ry ............................................ Jmmes S. Grimes Breaking the News to His We planned the marriage for a year. I had finished my sophomore year at Georgia, and Paula had completed her modeling school, and, in the meantime, some yo-yo had asked her to go off to Gatlinburg with him to model some of his sweaters, forcing me into fits of jealousy and further instilling in me the desire to make it official that she was off the market. The big problem, I had thought, would be my moth- er. The one great fear in her life was that I would not fin- ish college, and she consid- ered early marriages cer- tainly detrimental toward that end. And I had promised her I would not rush toward the altar, and I had meant it at the time, but I had made that promise under duress - Bubba Gatewood was out somewhere, riding around in his car with my girlfriend. I saw no use delaying the inevitable. I was home for a week- end. My mother was in the kitchen cooking my favorite meal - fried corned beef out of a can, navy beans, corn- bread and French fries. I walked into the kitchen. I was nervous. "I've got something to tell you," I said. Mothers know. Somehow, they just know. There was no reason for her to speak. I could see it in her face and in her eyes that she was antici- pating a momentous, and per- haps dreaded, announcement from me. She walked to the kitchen table and sat down. Perspiration was running off her forehead from standing over the heat of the stove. I sat across the table from her. "Paula and I want to get married," I said. OUR EYES were locked together. I thought I read her clearly. She had known this was coming, she was saying to herself. She realized the impatience of youth, but if only they really knew what they were doing, if only there were some way she could tell me, tell us both, that we had so much time yet to go; if only she could make us aware of the dangers and the risk; if only there were something she could say to make us change our minds. I had dreaded this, and I bad already played the scene over in my mind a thousand times. "you promised me you wouldn't rush into anything like this," she would say. "I know," I would reply, 'but I miss Paula so much, and this turkey asked her to go to Gatlinburg with him, and I just can't wait any longer." "But what about school?" she would ask. "I'll finish," would be my answer. "I've got a job, and Paula will get a job, and I'll stay in school." "She's not pregnant, is she?" "Of course she's not preg- nant. We just love each other very much, and we want to be together." "You're sure?" "I'm sure." "But you're both so young." "We're 19." "You're making a horrible mistake, son," my mother would continue, beginning to sob. I would feel awful about breaking my promise to her, about disappointing her. I wondered if she would come to the wedding. THE SCENE, however, was nothing like that at all. My mother and I had both grown out of the protective role she had played in our relationship before. She had given generously, and I had taken, a great deal of inde- pendence. We had remained close, but she had not fought against her emptied nest. Now I sat before her, I ing made the most decision of my young Life, I had underestimated precious trust. I had acknowledged the fact this woman, my also my friend, and love for me would not her to come down hard onZ for any decision I have done so would have lated that grown to - one of respect, one of ing. I had no way of it at the time, but to reached that peak of fortable interaction with mother was a happenstance, one that are any other person, much with a parent. ...to be continued week BY SPECIAL BTrH HIS WIDOW; DEDRA, HOME NEWS IS ( ED COLLeeNS BY THE LATE GRIZZARD, BY MOUND, A.N~D MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS TIME. { BOOKS AND TAPES ARE: ABLEFOR: PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND BOOK AND MUSR WIDE. Why Some Churches Fuss Since the church is a big part of the lives of a lot of people in this town, we have spent the last several weeks talking about the church. Hopefully, many things have been understood about what the Bible says about the church. The first thing that was looked at was "What Is the Church." We found that the church is more than bricks and boards. The church is people. Those who make up the true church are those who have trusted Christ as their Savior. But, we must also real- ize that, as the bumper stick- er stated, "Christians aren't perfect, just forgiven," peo- ple are still human. When a person gets saved, along with the new nature created by the Spirit, the person retains his old nature. (Romans 7) Because of this, people have fusses. Many wonderful things can be said about the church. The local assembly I pastor is made up of wonderful peo- ple, but those wonderful peo- ple are still only sinners saved by grace, just as their pastor, namely me. The people here love each other, love the lost, and love the Lord, and I'm sure you could say many good things about your church. But, from time to time we can hear of a church having a fuss. It is sad, but sometimes it is true. IN SOME PLACES a fuss is the rule instead of the ,exception. Although church- es are made up of human beings, it is possible that they can walk together, worship together, and work together without the hindrance of a fuss. King David said in Psalms 133 and verse 1, "Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity?" Good Lord willing, next week we will consider why it is that churches seem to always have a dispute going and what can be done to rem- edy the situation. But, for the remainder of the space we have left this week, let's con- sider what happens when a church does fuss. There are two things the Apostle Paul brings out in the first chapter of his first let- ter to the church at Corinth: The people at the church to which Paul wrote were fuss- ing over who the best preach- er was. Because of that, he asks them a very pointed question in verse 13 of chap- ter one. Paul asked, "Is Christ divided?" That word divided means to cut to pieces as if to serve to several people. On the cross of Calvary Jesus was crucified. Many do not real- ize how horrible a death Jesus died, nor do they realize how he suffered before he was nailed to that cross. According to Isaiah 52:14, Jesus was beaten so badly that his face was not even rec- ognizable as ~ human. According to Isaiah 53.7, Jesus was led as a lamb to the slaughter. He was literally butchered on Calvary's cruel cross. You may be what has this got to do a fussing church? on the cross and Paul the church at Corinth if ( was divided. Paul is implying that a divided church is a that might as well 6:6 says, "Seein fy to themselves the Son God afresh and put him open shame." Because of hurt and pain and it Jesus, it is a sad people who claim to love Lord fuss and fight themselves. Briefly the second a fussing church does is der the said in 1 Corinthians "...lest the cross of .C~ should be made of effect." He means a fussi~ church hinders folks fro# believing the gospel message~ Let's ask ourselves this queS, tion: "Is it more important get my way or is it more important that we have a tes" timony that helps people to accept Christ?" 50 Years Ago.., In the Hogansville Herald ~to the Hogansvme Home Nev~ DROUGHT WORRIES- The Sept. 30, 1954 Hogansville Herald had a number of articles about the severe drought hitting the area. A front-page arti- cle headlined, "City Water Supply Endangered as Long Dry Spell Continues" urged residents to con- serve water. ~Vlonday, orders were issued from the mayor's office to curtail the local water supply as much as possible, due to the decrease in the water in the creek from which the city pumps its water into the big tanks." Mayor Bill Crawford said the short- age was "very critical., An inside story carded the headline, "Garden Club Weeps Over Water Shortage." COMEDY-LESS CINEMA TIME - Movies show- ir~j at the Royal Theatre that week definitely leaned toward action. Featured were =King of the Khyt)er Rifles," "Captain Kidd and the Slave Gid," "Dark Command," "Massacre Canyon" and "Broken Lance." *WANT AD WONDERS - =Make extra money. Address, mail postcards, spare time every week." GOOD-LOOKING BARGAINS OF THE 505 - Henson Furniture Company ran an ad offering a "Beaut~ul Metal Waste Basket" for 25 oe~s. GIVE ME 10 MINUTES TO GET HOME, PLEASE , Local photographer Fred Brown was opening a . photo studio in his home. =Although busy at Stark. Mill inthe morning and eady afternoon," Brown would welcorr'~ photo customers at his house %vhere he can be found any time after 4:10 p.m."