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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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October 3, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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October 3, 2002
 

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Opinions &amp; Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS -OCT. 3, 2002 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-04O MIKZ ltm PUBLISHF_MADvInSING DmEcaxm JOHN KAtL ASOCIATE Ptmlarlxm RoB Rz ASSISTANT EDITOR JAm  BUStNESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 8462206 P O. Box 426 HogansviUe, Georgia 3O23O Are Kids Suffering? I received a phone call a couple of weeks ago from a good friend and a person with great concern for children. Johnny Wilkes, who serves as executive director for Good Shepeherd Therapeutic Center, called and was very concerned that Georgia is "'struggling with a child wel- t'are crisis that is begging for help.'" When Wilkes talks to me about things like this, I give a listen. If there is one thing I know about Wilkes is that he cares greatly about al[ children. "Children are dying because of a lack of Department of Family and Children's Services (DFACS) intervention." he told me. "Too many children are coming into the system that is ill equipped to provide the care and nurturance the State of Georgia promises its abused and neglected children. "Private, not-for-profit agencies provide over 2,450 bed spaces for these children, and that puts us on the front line in the battle." Private providers have recently joined forces with DFACS, the Department of Juvenile Justice and Gov. Barnes' Task Force for Safe Children to develop a system that will solve most of the problems. The new system is simply called "Level of Care." Under this system, when a child who has been abused and neglected must enter the foster care system, he/she would be served in the least restrictive setting that meets hi:er treatment needs, and each level would have resources and services mfique to each child. WILKES PROVIDED me with some information he had obtained about the reform: "It is a little known fact amongthe citizens of the state, but Georgia currently ranks 47th iu the nation in terms of quality care for children in state custody. Our children are being neglected and abused by the very system that attempts to protect them, it is a system in desperate need of reform," one of the print outs provided by Wdkes read. The reform is expected to cost Georgia about $15 mil- lion dollars. I shuttered at the thought of that amount of money, but then Wilkes point- ed out, "The cost of such a widespread re-creation of our residential childcare system can seem so datmting that the problem gets pushed aside, again and again, it/favor of more manageable problems." Wilkes then pointed out this was a 'aanageable problem." Wilkes pointed out that childcare reform would cost the same as the following projects that occur often in Georgi Paving three miles of a four-lane road; Building 1/3 miles of the Northern Arc around Atlanta; Purchasing one used 1996 Gulfstream 200 plane (noting the cost of anew plane is only $2,5 million). Considering these facts, made childcare reformseem less costly. SAID THAT the action required for the reform were as follows: All state agencies and the Governor's office must accept the recommendations of the Governor's own Action Group for Safe Children, commonly referred to as level-of-care system. Full funding must be placed in the Governor's Budget, and approved by the L00sl00. service delivery depends od adequate funding. ACCORDING TO infor- mation obtained from Normer Adams, executive directm" for the Georgia Association of Homes and Services for Children, surveys show that Georgia is failing. "The most recent review of our child welfare system by the United States Department of I-IeIth and Human Services eom'ml Georgia is failing children at risk of abuse and neglact. "Many studies have reviewed Georgia's child web fare system, all have come to the conclusi that without major additimml resources, and amges in paiey, daadrm will continue to be nlected and abused by the very gov- ernment agencies charged with their p "Class action lawsuits against the state, tided to force the state to reform, are cur- rently pending. Children are dying, we have a crisis. "The Governor's Action Group for Safe Children haa recommended a solution that includes a systemic change. .The private, not-for-profit providers are convinced this approach will improve the protection we provide to Geergia childr" For more trormak c, ontact Adams at 01840 $72- 6170 or mm, ne,@ffaarg Tnv H(R;ANS ILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercuq PuNi.hing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at ?g)51 Roosevelt Highway, Manchcstcr. Gcorgta 31816. USPS 6204340, Subscription rates by mail: $1 g in Troup, Harri or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all ale, taxe,< Pedtxtical tage paid at Hogansville. Geolgia 30230. FOR St'B,'RIP-rIONS call  706 846-3188 or write to Cilxxilation , Star Mmvura Publication. P. O, Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816. Pc TM,LSTER: Send address changes to E O. Box 426. Hogansville, GA 30230. STAff Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Asx'iate Publisher and Editor ................................................  .......... John Kuyimdall Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goidsttm Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richatdsoa StatfWriter .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant AssNlant Adxenising Manager .................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sale-. ......................................................................................  Leslet Coml)sing ................................................................. Dewayne Rowefs.'Valiada Ivery ('irculation Manager .................................................................................... Judy Crews *Leal .................................................................................................. :... Jayn Cm4dslon Prcssrtm.Mmager. ....................................................................... Wayne i Ihcssn)m ........................................ David Boggs, Larry Colleges,  Alkinson Cop.mp.xn Pmsidem ............................................................................................ .Millatd B. C.imes Vice Preidem .................................................................................. Chadotle S. Gdmcs 5ecrctu'x. ......................................................................................... Laura Grimes corer "Dcasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grim Garr tx'gal ('ounvcl and Assistant Secretar),. ............................................. .Janl S. rinles Stories That We Can learn Allow me to share two sto- ries with you today that you will find amusing. Both sto- ries are supposedly true. Maybe we can learn some- thing from them. The first story is about a Charlotte, N.C. lawyer who purchased a box of very rare and expensive cigars, then insured them against fire and other things. Within a month he had smoked his entire stockpile of these great cigars, and without yet hav- ing made his first premium payment on the policy, the lawyer filed a claim against the insurance company. In his claim the lawyer stated that the cigars were lost'qnaseriesofsmall fires." The insurance company refu _.-l to pay citing the obvi- ous reason that the man had consumed the cigars in the normal fashion. The lawyer won the suit! In delivering the ruling the judge agreed with the insurance company attorney that the claim was frivolous. He stated, nevertheless, that the lawyer held a policy from the company in which it had warranted that the cigars were insurable, and also guar- anteed that it would insure them against fire, without defining what is considered to be unacceptable fire. His ruling was that the insurance company pay the claim. Rather than endure a lengthy and costly appeal process the insurance com- pany accepted the ruling and paid $15,000 to the lawyer for his loss of the rare cigars lost in the "fires." After the lawyer cashed the check the insurance com- pany had him arrested on 24 counts of arson. With his own insurance claim and testimo- ny from the previous case being used against him, the lawyer was convicted of intentionally burning his insured property and was sentenced to 24 months in jail and a $24,000 fine. The number of people watching us at any one moment is directly propor- tional to the stupidity of our actions. That Charlotte attor- ney had to have had many friends. decided to have his estate divided friends, if he could who they were, had no relatives. The man passed acquaintances were his funeral would be a' in day. Only two men "As you slide woman attended the down the banisters When the will of your life, pray that a//the s/teFs thereshare expectingof thet will be pointed in Unfortunately for the Fight d/FetIolk" those present, the people watching him. ANOTHERSTORYis told about a doctor-patient con- versation. "You had better get your house in order," the doc- tor said to an elderly, wethy patient one day. The man had built his for- tune through a number of shady business deals; there- fore, consequently he had few ed that the man's divided who attended his Those three attended the 4 felt good to get up at that odd honor him. So we remember that the only never fails. As isters of your life, all the splinters will ed in the right The Challenge for All Everyone that is a true born again Christian, trying to live their life in the will of God, is no stranger to the influences that Satan, through this world's system, exerts upon their life. Those influences come from all directions and take on many different forms. It matters not how old a person may be, every child of God feels the pressure from an ever decaying society. Whether we feel the procure personally from an indlvid- ual, publicly from a govern- ment that has turned its back on God, or from a communi- ty that is going to hell in a hand basket, the pressure to conform to the mold of this society is great. The stan- dards of morality are falling, the importance of the church house in the life of families is declining, and the commit- ment to be a dedicated Christian is quickly becom- ing a thing of the past. While the prostitute, the drug addict, the alcoholic, the homosexual, and the crack houses are thriving, the child of God that stands for right, is becoming a minority. While the child of God feels the pressure from the world, we can hear the chal- lenge from the word of God to exert pressure and let the world feel the influence of a church on fire for God. You see, just as the church feels the pressure of the world, the world ought to feel the pres- sure of the church. In our schools, the ones who push the dope, carry the guns, make bomb threats and disrespect autlority ought to feel the pressure of godly young people who stand for what is right. In our communities the pushers, alcoholics, perverts and the like ought to feel the pressure from Christians who have decided to take a stand for the truths found in the Bible. We as believers in Christ as Savior have a chal- lenge from the lips of our Lord. Jesus tells his disciples in Matthew S, "Ye are the salt of the earth." We all look around and can almost see our society dete- riorating. Many have won- dered what can be done. Thel, e are those who have said to close the crack houses, get rid of the pornography, or close the beer joints. The world in general will never get any better until Jesus comes, but one thing we know is this, ff Christians would be what God has told them to be, then in our little corner of the world, the decay can be slowed. I base that statement upon what Jesus said in Matthew S. Salt does many things, but mainly, especial- ly in Bible days, salt was a preservative. When Christians are salty salt, then the decay in our society can be slowed. The Bible does not com- rnand us to be salt, but rather Jesus states the fact that we are salt. The question today is, what kind of salt are we? What kind of influence do we have on those around us? Salt can never be not salt, but salt can become contaminatec It can become so contaminated that it loses its as salt. Christians wi11 be the salt of the Christians can contaminated that longer have any ness to influence munity for the glorY The answer to decay does not rest government, or l the problems. The answer Christians to be salty If ingtobe them tobe,t ff o# house is closed, open elsewhere. to child of God. The problem la stated, given, and the and stand up for the pies found in the God? May God help salty saints and exert sure upon never been felt. Inthe Hogansville *BIG AMF: Hogansville Green go for another test of evening at est teams in the team that dethroned West Point and brought end the Pointer ning streak play." and woman in the Forces. V. Hawley county chairman, the above as an the remainder of 1952.. "The beginning of a school term has Hogansville opportunity to take stod most  asset-  and girls." *ON PARADES: other day we had guinea pigs, dogs description, pandas, bears, cats and eve0 upped carts up main streets."