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Manchester, Georgia
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October 5, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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October 5, 2000
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - OCTOBER 5, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-O4O A 6rims ltuhliatinn Millard B. Grimes, President MIl HAI PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KmaCALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDFrOR BRYAN Gm'r AssociATE EDrrOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 8463188. Fax (706) 846-2206 R O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Life Is Just Fine . In 'Rural Georgia' : I'm hopping mad about com- : ments made about the population : of rural Georgia by a couple of ! those over-educated and pompous folks from Atlanta. BY NOW most people have ! probably heard about RU-486, an abortion pill that allows women to end early pregnancies in relative privacy and without surgery. Well, the Food and Drug Administration approved the pill for use in the United States last Thursday. The pill should be made avail- able to doctors within a month. The pill is not something that can be purchased by women through a pharmacy. It must be prescribed by a doctor that is able to diagnose pregnancies and either be able to perform surgery, if necessary, or arrange surgical backup. The pill was first approved in France in 1988 where it was devel- oped by Roussel-Uclaf. It was banned in the United States until the Clinton administration, in one of its first actions, asked the FDA to re-examine the ban in 1993. According to reports from FDA, the procedure is about 95 percent effective. The report also indicates only about-line out of 20 women who use the drug may have to end the abortion surgically. : Use of the drug would cost about the same amount as a sur- gical abortion, $300 to $400. According to The Atlanta- Constitution, hundreds of women in the Atlanta area have used the drug as part of a clinical trial pro- cedure. A story printed in the AJC last Friday stated 96 percent of the women that used the drug would recommend its use to other . women. : Having said all of that, now we ! can concentrate on the interest- ing part of the article. i ACCORDING TO the AJC story, about 85 percent of the abor- : tions in the state of Georgia are :: performed in the Atlanta area. The ? story indicated the reason most !abortions are performed in i Atlanta is because most rural com- : munities were against abortion in : the first place. i 'There has always been a neg- :! ative perception about anything i having to do with abortion and !-right-to-life issues (in rural :areas)," the AJC quoted Dr. :. Andrew Toledo, a board.member :: of the Georgia i Obstetrics/Gynecology SoCiety as saying. Kay Scott, Planned Parenthood of Georgia president and CEO was quoted as saying, i 'The problem of access for poor, :i rural women will continue to : exist." The story also indicated that rural community doctors would have a problem prescribing the drug because the people of the rural community would not accept it well. THE PURPOSE of this column is not to discuss the pill or abor- tion really, but rather the attitude that Metro-Atlanta appears to have about rural community Georgia From what I've read and heard over the years, it appears that folks in the Metro-Atlanta area think of people in rural Georgia as a bunch of uneducated 'ubbas." An exam- ple of that, they keep dumping their waste into the river that feeds our area and nothing is done about it because Atlanta has to dump somewhere, so why not onthe hill- billies? After all, we don't need clean water as much as they do. I HAVE kinfolks in Atlanta, and it is apparent they think of everything outside of Metro- Atlanta as being a backwoods, unchhrted territory. When they speak of visiting, they refer to it as "coming to the hicks." Well, I have news for those folks in Atlanta. We are not Atlanta's dumping grounds and we are certainly not a bunch of uneducated hicks. After all, this "Bubba" accessed the AJC web- site with his computer to acquire this information after reading about in the daily AJC. Yes, the folks in rural Georgia do have phones and in=door plumbing. Most of us own computers, have college degrees and enough brains to know what to do with both of them. AS FAR as this writer is con- cerned, the folks in Atlanta can take their opinions of people and rural Georgia and stuff them. Yes, some people in rural Georgia may have a problem with abortion, but that is because we have morals and standards. We chose to live in rural Georgia and rear our children here because of the quality of life it provides.After all, we don't have police officers roaming the halls of our schools each day to pro- tect our children. IF LIVING in Metro-Atlanta means accepting guns, knives and violence as an everyday way of life, I'll take rural Georgia. If I'm branded a "Bubba," so be it. THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 305 i Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia  1816. USPS 6204)40. Subscriptiou rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at HogansviUe0 Georgia 30230. FoE SUBSCRmnONS call (706) 846-3 ] 88 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. : Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................. John Kuykendall Associate Editor ......................................................... : ............  ........................... Bryan Geter Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Staff Writers .......................................................... ; ............ Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ................................................................................................. Loft Camp Assistant Editor ........................................................................  .................. Rob Richardson Composing ................................................ :....Valinda lvery, Deborah Smith, Lauren King Legals ............................................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager. ............................................................................................. Todd Laird Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski COpYOP, AT OnFJs President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ............. . .......................................................................... Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. Grimes Don't You Mess With Good In protest for what I consid- er to be recent unfair attacks on beef, one of my favorite meats, I went out and had myself a thick, juicy T-bone at Longhorn Steaks the other night. It was great, as usual. I would have eaten two if my stomach would have held another because we beef-eaters need to do all we can to tell the wimps and weenies who have put themselves in charge of our lifestyles to go eat a bucket of worms (a.k.a. sushi). It's cow meat they're after now. One group says we're being cruel by killing cows and chop- ping them into steaks. There's a book out about the evils, both social and physical, of eating beef as well. I refuse to name it here and give it any pub- licity. AND THEN I READ a story in the papers about a report from the American Chemical Society saying the natural substance that gives beef its meaty taste has been synthesized in the laborato- ry and may be used to turn tofu into a substitute for beef. Do what? I asked a health nut to tell me what tofu is. It sounds to me like a ballet dance step. "It's soybean-based," she explained. So let me see if I have this straight. Some scientist has come up with something in his lab to put in something made out of soy- beans, and I'm supposed to eat that instead of beef? The magic ingredient is BMP. Said the arti- cle, "BMP could be used to make imitation beef with little or no sat- urated fat similar to the way fake crab meat is made." Fake crab meat? What's going on here? In the first place, I once ate a soybean burger. Another friend of mine, also a health nut, said, "Try this, you might like it." Somebody once said the same thing to me about marriage. The soybean burger was awful, so I went to Wendy's and got myself a double with cheese to get the taste out of my mouth. IN THE SECOND place, when are those self-appointed jerks going to stop jacking us around about our food? Remember when you were growing up how impor- tant it was to eat eggs? "Eat the rest of those eggs, young man," my mother would say, "so you'll grow up big and strong." .Not anymore. Now they say eggs cause diphtheria, not to men- tion shortness and weakness, so somebody has come out with a fake egg. I bet a chicken could tell the difference. Pork has been put down as unhealthy. Some chickens have tumors in them and fish have mer- cury, and I never knew there was such a thing as fake crab meat until now. So what's left to eat? Nothing much. If what we read and hear is true, we'd all be better off if we didn't eat anything at all, never i::!i!i i ili0000!!i!iii "Life used to be fun. Now it's just one big Don't." hadsex, abstained from drinking, smoking and gambling, and died on the operating table instead of getting a blood transfusion that could give us AIDS. Life used to be fun. Now it's just one big Don't. But I'll tell you what I'm going to do. I'm going to continue to eat beef and everything else I like. I will never walk into a Longhorn and say, "I'll have the tofu T-bose,, " please." If doing such a thing kills me, it'll just have to kill me. I think I'd rather go sudden- ly from a beef overdose than live long enough to get really sick and wind up croaking in a hospital bed where they've been keeping me alive by feeding me through a tube. There should be the basic right to live free from as much worry as possible. But h0V' you, when not we aren't told what's the thing that's bad for us? Eat, and be merry, I say, for row you may choke on of broccoli. BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE HOME CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LEWIS GRIZZARD UP IN NEARBY AND BECAME THE WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS GRIZZARD BELONGED ALL AMERICA BUT HE TICULARLY BELONGID THIS AREA OF WHICH HE WROTE SO AND WHERE A PORTION 85 FROM NEWNAN HOGANSVILLE IS HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD MUSEUM IN 1996, AND A WRITING EDITING LAB IS BEING I ICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED OF GEOR(. BOOKS AND TAPES ARE AVAILABLE FOR THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. 191266, GA 1266ANDATBOOK STORES NATIONWIDE. , / Ties That Bound Callaway and FDR Many Georgians recall Cason Callaway in the 1930s as a man who would speak up for Roosevelt or remain silent Wli6fiN6V Deal policies -- and particularly per- sonalities- came up at the Capital City Club in Atlanta and other places that wealthy anti- Rooseveltians gathered. Even when his mills were engaged in a bitter strike with the textile union trying to organize the South, a fight that found Roosevelt and Callaway on opposite sides of the fence, their friendship remained. They visited each other in Georgia or the White House, and corresponded frequently. That strike tested them. Roosevelt made several speeches and other public statements con- demning wages in the textile industry. He complained to a conference of newspaper editors about the way union organizers were harassed by the mill operators. Callaway, for his part, fired strik- ers. (Gay Shepperson hired some of them.) ACCORDING TO SOME union officials, this 1935 strike or one in 1934 involving other plants in Georgia, but not Callaway's, was called off after Roosevelt's private assurance that there would be no retaliation. Roosevelt did publicly urge strikers to return to work in 1934 and publicly urged firms to take them back without prejudice. ay wrote Roosevelt a letter explaining why the strike was unnecessary from his point of view. But except for that letter, which Roosevelt apparently did not answer such talk about issues bn which they disagreed was rare between the two. Mrs. Callaway said later she never heard them argue about such issues. IN CONNECTION with the textile industry, Roosevelt cer- tainly felt on the other side of the line from the mill owners, even those he thought were somewhat enlightened. He told a conference of news- paper editors once that he knew of "a certain cotton mill in the South" where wages and housing and working conditions were "good, above average," but that when union organizers showed up, they got 'he worst beating up that any two people could get without getting killed." A textile worker in North Carolina once told a Charlotte newspaper reporter that 'oosevelt is the oniy man we ever had in the White House who would understand that my boss is a son of a bitch." That was true, no doubt, but there is no evidence to sug- "I know Roosevelt liked me, else he wouldn't have been so kind and thoughtful and considerate." gest that Roosevl t felt that way about Cason Callaway. Mainly Roosevelt and Callaway shared a common inter- est in Georgia agriculture, did have imaginative ideas about it and, most importantly, were able to relax from hectic careers in ,each other's company. Callaway once defended his friendship with words to this effect: "I know Roosevelt liked me, n't R0osevdt in small, Callaways were once overnight white tie dinner for ,Court justices. pack his white buttons. He for a spare set. he had only one set. So an went to the reception with buttons. His embarrassment left when he saw one other (Next Week: The parties Warm Springs.) A I-IE ; OF WAIVI SPRINGS IS 0 N AT' TIE WHITE HOUSE. IT TAINS ALL OF THE REPRINTED IN PER DURING THE PROCEEDS 1 SALE ALL GO TO TI' SEVELT CENTER. Best Description: 'Murder in a Pill' A popular song from years past contains a line that goes something like this. "I'm proud to be an American, where at least I know I'm free." That phrase undoubtedly expresses the senti- ments of millions living in America today. This nation is unquestionably the greatest nation standing on this Earth. As proud as I am to be called an American, certain events of recent days have stirred a vari- etT of emotions within my heart. Emotions such as sadness, anger, shame, and bewilderment, have not only risen to the top of my being, but I would venture to say in many others as well. The event to which I'm referring is the intro- duction of the abortion pill RU- 486 into our country. The day abortion was legalized by this country was one of the darkest days in American history. There are those who would try to place other names on this dreadful act, but no matter how you label it, it still comes out the same, pre- meditated murder or just plain old sin. It is not within the scope of this article to exhaust all the claims to the validity of the mur- der of millions of Americans. However, as I was listening to the news shows, which tried to give both sides of the issue equal treat- ment, a proponent of the murder pill kept referring to the unborn as a fetus and not a child. This perhaps is the way the abortion- ist justifies the murder of inno- cent human beings. They have convinced themselves that the unborn is not a person until they have left the womb and entered this world. This is one of the many concepts to which I respectfully, yet vehemently and dogmatical- ly, disagree. Some may be won- dering what are my credentials or qualifications that would cause this preacher to make such a statement. It isn't any qualifica- tions that I possess, but I do base what I say on the truth of the Word of God. Even more than I disagree with the abortionist, I state unequivocally that I agree with the truth of God found in His Word. Some time ago I saw a bumper sticker which said, "The Bible says it, I believe it and that set- ties it." As good as that may sound, I must disagree. The Bible says it and that settles it, whether I believe it or not. The truth of God's Word is not dependent upon the acceptance of its claims by humanity. The Word of God is for- ever settled in Heaven and that includes the truths relating to the murder of children. We can read in Scripture what God says about the unborn. What we need to understand is the unborn in the womb is more than a a child known by already given a special in this life. It. is my prayer deluded abortionists realize what they are nothing short of murder est of marks on try. If this practice doesn't to a halt soon, I shudder to of the harvest that will be because of this allowed in our great land. may our hearts the of Christ found 7, :"And whoso such little child in mY receiveth me. But offend one of these which believe in me. ter for him that hanged about his neck, he Were drowned in the the sea. Woe unto the because of offences! needs be that woe to that man by offence cometh!"