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Manchester, Georgia
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October 11, 2001     The Hogansville Herald
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October 11, 2001
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVIt J.F. HOME NEWS -OCT. 11, 2001 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS A 0;t'il.q uttlicatimt Miliard B. Grimes, President MIKE tta PUBLISHER/AI)\\;?.TI S IN G DrP;CmR JOHN KtAT-DMJ, ASSOCIATE PUBIJStIRJEDITOR Br' G ASSOCIATF EDFFOR JAYNE GOLD,TON B U S INEL-k":, MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188- Fax (7(k6) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia ,J Gaining Weight Gets Too Easy My, my how much things can change in a year. The other day'I went shopping for a new pair of jeans and was shocked when I found out that a 40 waist was a little tight. In about a year I've gone from wearing a 34 waist to a 40. At this rate I'm gonna have to start wearing a wide load sign. It's unbelievable! I feel as though I'm pulling the wide load and the road behind it as well. Really and truly it's not the additional weight that bothers me. It's my health that worries me a little bit. It's funny, but this time last year the last thing on my mind was losing weight. I've never been over weight. I've always been a "good size." No more, however. Today, chil- dren use my belly for a umbrella when it's raining. I remember standing in church one morning and a lit- tle girl pointing toward me and saying, "Look Mama. That man's tie lies flat. It does- n't bow out like the other men's does." Her mother was a little embarrassed, but I knew exactly what the girl meant. As we men get older, gur beUie get bigger. Of course, we try and convince ourselves it's just an age thing. We don't want to admit that we're just lazier and exer- cise less. Unfortunately for me, it's not just age that has caught up to me. On November 1, 2000, I decided to quit smoking. I did it to help improve my health, but that's a story for another day. Anyway, after I quit smok- ing I really started putting on weight. Of course many things have changed for me over the past two years that have contributed to my weight problem. First of all, I used to get lots of exercise. I spent a great deal of time on the baseball or football field coaching. Due to my hours changing at work, I've given up coaching and don that exercise. ',, When I was out pounding, the streets for news and advertising, I did an awful lot of walking. Today, I work in pagination more and that means less walking. Anyway, the bottom line is I don't exercise like I should. I've thought several times about joining a gym to help me out, the only problem is the one near my office doesn't'provide a shower and there is no way I'm going to. the gym and not shower" before returning to work. So, the lack of exercise has great- ly added to my weight prob-. lem. The second problem I don't understand. I've gotten more health conscious during the past year and try to eat more soup and salad. I've also noticed that since I've gotten older, I also don't eat as much as I used to. Unfortunately when the age thing kicks in, you don't have to eat as much to gain weight. My Mom used to say, "Always eat sensibly because you are what you eat." I guess she was right cause a cow has nothing on me and I'm the best customer of all the local ham- burger joints. Heck, all the owners know me by name. The third problem I have is Coke. I love Coke and drink between four and six every day. I don drink much water and that is also a problem. The Cokes not only has con. tributed to my weight prob- lena, but I've also found out it is not healthy to drink that much Coke. Quitting smoking was one of the hardest things I've ever done. The only reason I was able to do it was with sheer determination and lots of will power. So, I've got to be deter- mined if I want to take off this weight. I've decided though, if I can quit smoking I can surly cut back on some of my food intake. I'm going to find a way to exercise, even if I have to join the health club and use baby wipes to fresh- en up. I've always weighed between 160 and 170 pounds. Now, I'm about a half pound below 200 and I can't stand it. I've always been able to see my" toes. I've said if I got to the point that I couldn't see my toes it was time to lose weight. Right now I would set- to just be able to see the d I'm walking on. ' "4mow there are lots of readers out there who can probably give me a few tips or some advice on how to get my '"de flat again." If you have any tips or guaranteed diets, write me at this newspaper or E-mail me at Jkuykendall@sm-pub.com and share them with me. I'm tired of looking and feeling like I swallowed an entire watermelon patch. THE H(R;ANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercur3" Publishing Company. a division of Grimes Publicati, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway. Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Submription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all tes taxes. Perkxlical postage prod at Hogansvill, a 30230. FoR svBstmnos call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulauon Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426. Manchester, Georgia 31816. Poss: Send address cbamges to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. ,grn Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ............................................................ JohnKuyl Business Manager i ............................................................................... Jayne Goldston Assistant Fktitor ...................................................................................... Rob Rich.son StaffWrite .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Ast Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising SMcs ...................................................................................... Lila Lester Composing ........................................................................ Valinda lvery, Lauren King Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Gohtst(m Pressman .......................................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pressroom .......................................................................... David Boggs, lm'y Colleges Comm OmcruRs fesident ............................................................................................. Millan:l B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlo.e S. Gri#,es Secretory. ......................................................................................... Laura Gri Cofer Tpeasmr ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counml and Assistant Secretary. ............................................. James S. Grimes Parents andAll Those Guilt Tri We all go back a long way, and quite naturally we begin telling our war stories, the ones that inevitably begin with "I'll never forget the time..." We don't see each other that often anymore, and we haven't seen each other's par- ents in years, and there is the southern custom of asking about one's parents. It goes, "How's your mama and 'em (and them)?" -- which translates into, "In what condition are your mother and your other first of kin?" We took turns talking about our parents. "My moth- er puts terrible guilt trips on me," somebody said. "I'll call and tell her I'm on my way shopping, and she'll say, 'I wish I had the money to go shopping."' "Mine does the same thing," said somebody else.'I won a trip to Las Vegas from my company and I called my mother and told her about it. "She said, 'I guess that means you won't be coming to see me in a long time.' "I said, 'Mama, it's just for a week.' She said, 'I may not be here another week.' "She's in perfect health, but I called every day from Vegas just to make sure she hadn't contracted some sort of terrible disease." I SAID MY mother still worries about whether or not I'm wearing clean underwear because I might be in a Teck and the doctors would see my dirty undershorts. "My mother does that, too," somebody else spoke up, "but it all means they really love us." It does. It's funny how our attitudes change about our parents as we get older and they get older. These people were our enemies when we were chil- dren. They were the ones who made us eat our vegetables, made us go to bed earlier than we wanted to, fussed over our grades, lectured us and wouldn't allow us out of the house with dirty underwear. But you forget all that, and you would miss the guilt trips if your folks weren't around to send you on them. "TELL THEM ABOUT your dad and the biscuits," one friend asked another. "God, it still makes me cry," she began. "Every morning when I go to work, I go right by my father's house. And every morning -- I've been doing this for years-- I stop by and drink coffee with him and he makes biscuits for me because he doesn't want me "But you forget all that, and you would miss the guilt trips if your folks weren't around to send you on them." going to work on an empty stomach. "One day I overslept, and I knew I wouldn't be able to stop by. He said 'You won't?' I could hear the disappoint- ment in his voice, but I said 'Daddy, I'll stop by tomorrow morning, so don't worry about it.' "So I get in the car and I start driving to work. As soon as I rounded the corner to drive past the house, I saw this figure standing out in the cold and rain with a sack in his hand. "It was Daddy. He was out there waiting for me so I would still have my Everybody in the was in tears when she ished. 'Tis the season to thankful. Thanks for love, the purest love of all. BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE HOME NEWS CARRYING COLUMNS GRIZZARD, NEARBY MORELAND, BECAME THE READ GEORGIA WRITER HIS TIMF BELONGED BUT HE BEIX}NGED TO THIS AREA GEORGIA, OF WHICH WROTE SO OFTEN, WHERE A PORTION OF FROM NEWNAN HOGANSVHJ IS NAMED HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD ESTABLISHED IN 1996, AND EDITING LAB IS BEING CATEDTOHI BEIVED UNIVERSITY ABLE FOR SALE BAD BOOT PRODUCTIONS BOX 191266, ATLANTA, 31118-1266 / Airlines Should Turn Down Some newspaper colum- nists and television talk show folks are beginning to ques- tion why our elected repre- sentatives voted so quickly to give $15 billion of taxpay- ers' money to the airline industry as a bailout as a result o the plane crashes on September 11. They say that maybe the House and Senate acted out of panic and exhaus- tion. For the record, New York's two senators, Charles E. Schumer and Hillary Clinton, spoke in favor of the bill that was sponsored by Rep. James L. Oberstar of Minnesota and Rep. Don Young of Alaska in the House. The top Senate promoter was John McCain of Arizona. It is interesting to note that the two House members promoting the bill received the most campaign money from the airlines this past election. It has been report- ed that Oberstar received $105,000 and Young $76,350 in donations, while McCain, a member of the Commerce Committee who oversees the airlines, received a $178,295 campaign donation from the air transport industry. Columnist Douglas Turner wrote that, "The air- line bill won sweeping majori- ties from rank and file mem- bers who were confused, or just plain pooped out, or undu- ly influenced by campaign money." He could well be right. The $15 billion gift, which should have been govern- ment guaranteed loans with restrictions to say the least, was not the thing to do. How about the companies in The Trade Center that lost most all employees? How about the businesses in New York that will suffer great losses in sales due to the devastation? How about the insurance companies that will pay out billions of dollars in claims? And we could go on and on. Bottom line is the airlines were catered to while others were left out. As has been pointed out, the bill required no sacrifices from airline executives who make millions of dollars per year. Nor did it provide for any income assistance or medical insurance for thou- sands of industry workers who are losing their jobs. In addition, airlines are being permitted to make service cuts and layoffs that would never be allowed by the government or the unions "Bottom line is the airlines were catered to wMle others were left OUt." under ordinary circum- stances. Turner wrote that there is no reason to give the air- lines money. "Wall Street is flush with cash to lend. All that is needed is the govern- ment guarantee to make them credit worthy. That lorrow- ing would have given New York City's financial markets a desperately needed shot in the arm," he said. Reports in the media late say that ah to 80-85 percent of its You and I major airlines are ly strong enough to the storm of decreased travel for a time. not, then they surefire to face personal earning: also stressed the ma of the airline layoffs. or maybe most, of the workers will receive no benefits from That brings about question. If ers will not share in the (taxpayer) money given airlines, then we must pose the funds will profit building for the utives and stockholders. If you get right down the nitty-gritty, what the lines should do, to maintain their and public trust, is to accept the free money. Uncle Sam we thank no thank you. We are to be Americans and we struggle through this time just like the brothers and sisters. Heed the Desire for Our This past summer on the baseball diamond, now this fall on the gridiron, the youth of our town play sports. While these young people play their little hearts out, seated in the stands are morns, dads, grandparents, aunts and uncles. These family mem- bers cheer their best for their child to hit, catch, run and score. It is natural, right, and good to cheer these young athletes on. As we cheer for these boys and girls to excel in sports, how many are given at least the same amount of support to excel in spiritual things? Every parent has a desire for their children. Parents want them to be good stu- dents, goqd athletes, good cit- izens, and generally good young people. How many desire for their children to be good Christians, and church members? Above all that is desired for our children, we should desire that God would bless them. Judges 13:24 says, "And the woman bare a son, and called his name Samson: and the child grew, and the Lord blessed him." As Samson grew, the Lord blessed him. That should be the desire for alIour children. Our children need love, care, respect, discipline, good role models, and more than they need anything, is for God to bless them. Too many times parents as well as children get caught up in the things of this world. Some feel their greatest need is to wear the latest fashions, be in the most popular crowd, or excel in their favorite sport. While no one wants to be looked upon as a "square," be rejected, or not perform well on the athletic field, these are not the most impor- tant things in a child's life. In a world of drug pushers and dealers, perverts and mur- derers, the only thing that will help our children is God. We all must admit that when it comes to raising chil- dren, the task is a difficult one. it seems there are no clear cut answers, there is a place we can turn so that our children may grow up with the blessings of God on them. We read in Judges 13 where Samson's father prayed in relation to raising Samson, "How shall we order the child, and how shall we do unto him?" The Lord in Heaven above wants to bless our children and give us the guidance on how to raise them. May we seek the Lord's wisdom and help so that our children may grow up enjoy- ing the blessings of God. Several years ago while pastoring in South Pittsburg, Tennessee, we were visiting for our bus route. We went to a home where a nine year old girl lived that had been rid- ing. After speaking about generalities with the mom, we inquired as to whether her daughter was coming to answer she gave will er be implanted ly didn't know because daughter wasn't home. mother went on to say was not going to "force would let her make her mind up. Parents particular, Ephesians 6:4 home is our responsibility, are in charge and we seeto brought up of the gospel Our young pie today oftentimes beating. They get blamed I this or that why they are We as parents ern our children's liveS they are protected evil, warned about the gers, and instructed in right. God has derful heritage in our dren. He has entrusted our care precious lives need the prope.r May we as parents be stewards of that has blessed us with.