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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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October 14, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
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October 14, 1999
 

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ORNION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - OCTOBER 14, 1999 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS Millard B. Grimes, PreScient USPS 620-040 MI IiA PUBLISHER]ADVERTISING DIRFLTOR JOHN KUVKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER]EDITOR MAroON (TED) SMrm MANAGING EDITOR/TECHNICAL DIRECTOR I,EEAnN WaaEr BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 tlogansville, Georgia 30230 Offwial Legal Organ, City of Hogam'vilk, Old Hotels Never Die We pass it everyday on Main Street. Probably very few give it more than a glance, but there must be some who remember and I am one of those. You see, I lived there, with my family, in 1925. The place was then "The Commercial Hotel." It is now "The Grand Hotel" and has received several face lifts, but I remember the old girl as she was many years ago. First, I must say, my mem- ory is not the best. Sometimes, I might forget to get up in the morning if it were not for my wife, who will remind me it is, indeed, another day. Mrs. Collier ran the hotel and she had a firm grip on the whys and wherefores. The meals were served boarding house style and large hungry crowds would vie for the food. Being young and timid, I some- times came out on the short end. The boarding rooms, as I recall, were on the second floor and several times, to demonstrate how weak I was from hunger, I would crawl up the stairs to our room. Mrs. Collier did not take kindly to such demonstrations and let it be known to one and all, espe- cially my parents. Allan Dee Dodson have ever eaten. I always thought, however, she put less on my plate tan she did on oth- ers. Mr. McKinnon, who owned the lumber mills, stayed at the hotel. One day, my brothers and I investigated his room and found what we thought were large chestnuts. We bor- rowed a few and tried to eat them. Found out a bit later they were buck eyes. Never eat a buck eye! We paid dearly for our sin. Across the muddy street were the drug stores- Shackleford and Daniel. At "Shacks" you could buy eski- mo pies. I had never had any and, without doubt, they must have come direct from heav- en, or at least Mount Olympus. Perhaps I owe my life to eski- mo pies. At Daniels, you could get a fount coke. I thought then, and TJaporC, bx@dthe , think now, that fount cokes west side'- well were far better than bottled as over the front as  now. cokes. It's been a long time Vines grew on the porch and with great care, and a lot of puffing, they could be smoked. Your tongue became very sore and you got a little sick, but it was smoking. You see, very lit- tle vine smoking these days. I doubt if there is one in all of West Georgia. On warm evenings, about half of Hogansville would gather on the sidewalk and front porch to discuss every- thing from preachers to poli- tics. I never discussed any- thing except how hungry I was. Mrs. Collier had a son named Minton and for us, it was hate at first sight. We enjoyed many a fight. I remember once we were hav- ing a rock battle and he hit me a good one right above the right eye. I bent down to secure a missile to return the compliment and when I pre- pared to deliver, he hit me another good one right above the left eye. I ran to my moth- er, with blood streaming. Mrs. Collier said I shouldn't have put my head in the wrong place, and that "little Minton" meant no harm. I still have the scars, and I still hate "little Minton." Mrs. Collier, sometimes would freeze ice cream and sell it for ten cents a dish. I still remember it as the best I since I've had one. I remem- ber Flowler Daniel as a fine man who later on was to help me with my reading-and helped others. We didn't stay there long, but I will always remember "The Commercial Hotel" and how hungry I was. A few years later, up around 1930, I could look back on the boarding house meals as "high on the hog." Some may remember the Western Union was in the hotel. Miss Weems was, as I recall, the operator. It seems to me you got 35 cents to deliv- er a telegram, but it must have been less. Whatever it was, it went for eskimo pies and fount cokes. Last week, we told you how helpful it was to read The Hogansville Herald. We are fortunate to have such a good library in Hogansville and to have such a wonderful librar- ian as Mrs. Overton Magnum. If she doesn't have the book you want, she will get it for you if it has been printed. She has helped me get talk- ing books. What a wonderful way to read a book, fiat on your back. You don't have to be as blind as a bat to qualify. Why not stop by and see Overton. She'll help you, too. See you next week, Lord willing. THE HO6ANSVn HO NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company. a division of Gfins Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $15 in Meriwether, Talbot or Hams Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, C_gorgin 30230. FoR suscawnoss call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, M.che, Georgm 31816. Pos:  addxeu changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. SrJr Publisher and Advcfdsing  ..................................................................... Mikc Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kuykendall Managing Editor and Technical  ........................................... Marion fred) Smith Business Manager ....................................................................................... LeeAnn W'dbert Assocmtc Editors .......................... Billy BanCralbomm, Miclmel $nider/Hams County Bryan GctedHogamvi]le, Caroline Yeager/Greenville, Lee N. Howell Staff Wfimr ......................................................................................................... J. Dan Stout Assistant Advertising Manager ....................................................................... laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lcster Photography .................................................................................................. .Michael Snider Composing ................................................................................... Valinda lvery,  Green Legals ................................................................................................................ valmda lve/ Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta You'a Pressroom ...................................................................... David Boggs, Wayne Gmcwski CoemT Omoms President ........................................................................................................ .Millard Vice President ........................................................................................ Omrlotte S. sm,y .............................................................................................. J.aura c, times Corer Treasurer ...................................................................... : ....................... Kathy Grimes Gar Legal Counscl and Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. Cremes Hospital Errors Kill 120,000 Annually Norman Carter told a story about an operation he once had at Emory University. He said his doctor came to see him every morning, and one morn- ing he stayed an unusually long time. When he left he said, "I sure did enjoy talking to you this morning. All my other patients are in a coma." Don't know if that is a true story or not but it kinda sets the stage for what I want to relay to you this week. I have never liked hospitals and thus far in my life have never had to spend the night in one as a patient. And after reading the fol-. lowing headline in a daily paper not long ago, I even dis- like them more. "Study: Hospital errors kill one of every 200 patients." Now does that bother you or not? Read on. Dr. David Hash, associate dean and director of the Office of Health Policy and Clinical Outcome at Thomas Jefferson University said, "The facts are, we commit thousands of errors every week national- ly." Bertrand Bell, a profes- sor at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York adds, "People get killed every day in hospitals. This goes on in every hospital in the United States. The public doesn't see it at all." Bothersome words, huh? One death by error out of every 200 hospital patients equates to one-half of one per- cent, which is a small per- centage. Yet the seemingly small percentage adds up to one mil- lion people being injured by errors in hospital treatment every year and 120,000 peo- ple dying as a result of those injuries. My aunt, the late Maggie Hull, was in a Columbus hos- pital a number of years ago receiving treatment for a back problem. One morning bright and Bob Tfibble Former early nurses came to her room, put her on a stretcher and wheeled her out the door towards the operating room. Ms. Maggie tried to tell the nurses that her doctor had not told her anything about an operation. At first they would not lis- ten to the mid-seventy year old lady. Finally, after much bickering from Ms. Maggie, the nurses reviewed their charts and discovered that they had the wrong patient. The correct patient to be operated on that morning was Ms, Maggie's roommate. You Get It By Ray King My college- educated son has got us selling methane made from our dairy cow wastes. He's become a real 'entt'- manure.--. ....... I According to the report, 48 percent of the errors result- ed from surgical treatment. Had Ms. Maggie not strongly protested the operation that morning she could have been among the above percentile. Studies have shown that only five to ten percent of all medical errors are reported to hospital administrators, with the remaining 90 to 95 percent going unreported. Chances are no one Was ever told about Ms. Maggie being carted out of her room early that morning for an "unsched- uled" operation. Reports on industrial qual- ity point out that a 99.9 per- cent profic'iency rate was unacceptable in most indus- tries. It would result in two unsafe airplane landings a day at busy airports, 16,000 of lost mail every hour, 32,000 checks deducted from the wrong bank account every hour. Assuming that rate could be achieved in health care would still leave thousands patients dead each year as the result of medical error. The stud3 of the medical errors report- ed, only 24 percent of the patients' families are abolttthem by hospital exec- utives.  These executives face business pressures to deny the occurrence of medical errors, lest the hospital be sued and have to pay. Nash concluded,"What do hospitals do with their risli management reports? Wei bury them as fast as possible." Finally, a man walked i the hospital one day and a nurse he had the shin The nurse said, "Go back the room, put on a gown an the doctor will see you in a minutes," The doetoreuae" went to the room, the man and'said, "I d6tft anything wrong with where are the shingles?" man replied, "They're there on my pickup truck." Have a good day! FDR Bought Farmland in Meriwether (Another in a series) Franklin Roosevelt had always been a farmer in his heart. His father had cattle and timber on his Hyde Park land. He took the boy on inspection tours. Franklin joined the Grange as a young adult, after he had begun practicing law in Manhattan. When he served briefly in the New York State Legislature before becoming Assistant Secretary of the Navy, he specialized in agri- cultural and conservation matters. And when he was Governor of New York he gave high pri- ority to farm matters. For instance, he set up an Agriculture Advisory Committee which reduced -taxes on farms and increased spending for education in rural areas. He liked to boast about his knowledge of farm problems, even before he had firsthand knowledge of them, and he liked to tease his city friends about the growing gap between city and rural life- styles. "Look, Grace," he said to his secretary Grace Tully once on a trip, pointing out the train window. "That's a cow." At least as early as 1926, or within about a year and a half after his first visit to Warm Springs, Roosevelt began buying farmland and woodland in Georgia. He bought some land from the Harts, the Columbus peo- ple whose cottage he occupied on his first trips to Warm oSfrings, and bits and pieces other holdings. Land was cheap in Georgia in the mid-1920s. According to Roosevelt's ledgers, he bought one 100-acre parcel on the side of Pine Mountain for $350. This was worthless by the normal standards of the day, but it was adjacent to a favorite spot of his, Dowdell's Knob, which offered a breath- taking view of Shiloh Valley - the Shenandoah Valley of the South, locals termed it. He got road built to the Knob. Farmland was cheap, too. There is some confusion in records and memories about the exact details of his acquir- ing the centerpiece of what came to be known as Roosevelt Farms. That was the Pine Mountain farm owned and run, when Roosevelt first arrived, by E.B. Doyle. Doyle apparently got into debt and sold his fwm to Roosevelt after an earlier arrangement between the two didn't work out. Roosevelt's acquaintance with Doyle was another of those involvements that gave him a close-up look at what economic depression could do to its victims. The Doyles were educated people from a middle-class background. Mrs. Doyle's father had been a small-town merchant, who lost his business when the boll weevil ruined his farmer customers. Ed Doyle's trou- bles were caused by - or at least complicated by - a small- town bank's failure, also induced by crop failures. Whatever the details between the two, Roosevelt's ledger shows that as of December 31, 1927, his assets included the "Hart farm" of unspecified acreage and the "Doyle farm" of 310 1/2 acres. He valued the former at $4,074.33 and the latter at $s,o7s. He added a couple of other parcels in 1927, one of approx- The Squire of Warm Spdngs , Theo imately 50 acres and the other of approximately 60 acres. Each cost about $50 an acre. He added to this again and again. Soon his total acreage was over 1,100 acres in Meriwether County and 1,600 in adjoining Harris County. In both counties, the overwhelm- ing majority of the land was in woodland or forest range. Probably never more than 300 acres were actually culti- vated. Almost all of that was in the Meriwether County part of the farm, near the founda- tion and the cottages. The farmhouse and barn were also in Meriwether. Doyle ran the farm for Roosevelt as resident manag- er, living on in the house there. It was actually a tenant's house that Doyle had taken over when his own burned down. Later he moved into town to make it easier for his children to go the school. Meriwether County was a cotton-and-peach agriculture center. Those two crops were mainstays of Georgia's econ- omy. But for Meriwether's 1,500 farmers in the middle 1920s, as for all Georgia cot- ton growers, cotton was risky business. The average Georgia cotton farmer lost money from 1925 through 1930 - and things got worse after 1930. As for peaches, their return on investment and labor had dwindled to the that one Meriwether pulled up half his Doyle wrote Roosevelt what they ought to do uproot all of theirs. Eventually, (but Doyle left), there was no orchard of commercial This was in a county that "the Peach State" in duction through the 1930s. It was cotton Roosevelt wanted most to away from in Georgm. believed that the endemic poverty would be solved as long as so of its farmers - owners. ants and sharecroppers looked to King Cotton. In 20% of all Georgia's was devoted to cotton. Later, when he President, Roosevelt ed programs that would farmers to limit sharply amount of cotton planted. But before that, and ing his presidency, he sought to demonstrate Georgia farmers that were better ways to farm that a good living could made from other practices. He was interested in ber as a cash crop, in in grapes, in goats, in a ety of vegetables, in thing. He was es interested in cattle. The whole point of his ership of a Georgia farm to demonstrate ers that a farm could be itable. He was not one of "gentleman farmers" pick up cheap farmland and cheap labor, in Georgia elsewhere, to enjoy a ly part-time life "on the (New Week: Cattleman.)