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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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October 18, 2001     The Hogansville Herald
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October 18, 2001
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS LISPS 620-040 ), (6rintc uhlicatimt Mtllard B. Grimes, President I-IAL PUBIJSI IER/ADWFRTIS ING D IR}Xq'OR Jot Kt'YKr_:AIJ. /LS,'S(IAa: PUBLISt I:R/EDrrOR BRYAN GETF AS. K'I:V[ EI)I'I)R JAYN GOLI36TON Busmv>k 1VLxNAGr:R Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 E O. Box 426 I togansviUe, Georgia 30230 Give to Charity: Real Ones, Only If at all possible I listen to Paul Harvey every day. I like his presentation of the news. However, he does have some pretty crazy things on the news sometimes. During my normal drive to work on Friday, I listened with interest as Paul talked about how Americans are so charitable and how so many people take advantage of it. Harvey shocked me when he stated that Americans had helped finance terrorists organizations and possibly the same one involved the September 1 lth tragedies. He noted that the }q3I had learned that members of terrorists organizations had collected funds from American citizens by saying it was going to char- itable cause. Harvey stated the terrorists just stood on street corners with little buckets mad signs saying the funds were going tb charita- ble causes. Those little buck- ets netted them hundreds of thousands of dollars. It also appears as though every time I pick up a news- paper, turn on the television oae.is selling something and a portion o f the money is going to the family members of those who died in the tragedy. Again, we as Americans are gullible and will buy whatev- er is being sold without proof that the money is going to a charitable cause. There is nothing wrong with giving to those in need. I've always believed if you have, then you should share with the have nots. HOWEVER, we must use common sense. Listening to Paul Harvey's report, it made me start thinking about how many times I've given to char- ities that were probably not charities at all. Who can resist the face of some of those cute little kids that walk up to you in the park- ing lot of your favorite store and ask for your change for their softball team, baseball team or whatever? That money may not be going to what we think it is. Think about it. It would pay each of us to pay more attention to those asking us for our spare change. I remember a story once that either appoarefl in the Atlanta Journal Constitution or USA Today about a beggar. The man had been on the same street corner every day for six years begging. He was a laid off factory worker that made about $25,000 per year on his ob. When he became a beggar, he made much more. Enough in fact to drive a Mercedes to his street cor- ner every day. He would park his Mercedes in a parking garage, leave it behind and then begin his daily job of beg- ging. According to the story, the man averaged making between $800 and $1,000 per week. More than most of the people that were giving him their dimes and nickels. SO, I WANT our readers to be aware. It is good to share what you have. I want to do as much as I can for the fam- ily of the victims as well. I have purchased t-shirts that part of the funds was suppose to be to the shirt manufacturer richer and only a few pennies go the victims. That's when I decided to make my donations directly to the Red Cross. I would sug- gest if you want to make a donation that you do the same. The old saying "a fool and his money" remains true today. ON ANOTHER note, President Bush has asked all the children of the United State to donate a dollar to help feed the children of Afghanistan. He stated that most of the children in the nation are suffering from malnutrition. He also said that one of every three children in the country are orphans. We should be compas- sionate and help out. The chil- dren of Afghanistan should nqt suffer because of one evil intlividual. I plan on sending afev dollars and I hope every American that can will do the same. BY doing so, we will show the world that we still care for our fellow man. We remain compassionate and willing to help those in need. I also think that we must continue Our war on terror- ism even though I know that 0aore attacks will come in America because of iL We must stay focused and do whatever it takes to end terrorism, not for just our sake.., but for the sake of the entire world. THI: HOt;ANSViLLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercu' Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roo-;elt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Merixether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all ales taxes. Periodical tage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR RIFnONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Malinger, Star Mercury Publications. P O. Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816. P-rsts-J: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville. GA 30230. STAI Publisher  Advertising tor ............................................................... Mike Hale Ass-iate Publisher and Editor ............................. . ............................. John Kuykendall Businets Mmmger ............................................................................... Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWfiters .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ........................................................................................ Linda ter Composing ........................................................................ Valinda lvery, Lauren King Legals ..................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Pressman .......................................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pressroom .................................... . ..................................... David Boggs, Lar D' Colleges Com,onn Omcvas Presim ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice ident ................................. , .......................................... ,....otte S. Grimes Secretary ......................................................................................... Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer. ............................................. : ....................................... Kathy Grimes Legal Coun.l and A.,sistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - OCT. 18, 2001 i Minutiae CanEasily Fill the Time When I opened the kitchen door that morning, a totally black dog that I'd never seen before was lying on the stoop asifhe were right at home. He didn't budge, so after a while I called Animal Control and was told that someone would be dis- patched. After about 45 min- utes a call came asking again for directions. Soon a woman drove up in a truck. She got out, propped her paraphernalia against the truck door and coaxed the dog to her. In no time she had him in a cage in the back and was on her way. The dog looked well fed, but had no collar. Hopefully he was a pet and will be claimed. I was then able to get on with my morning schedule. Since Molly had called days before and invited me to come for dinner and to spend the night with her family, I baked a batch of her favorite choco- late biscotti to take along. There was also a box con- taining a few items I thought she'd like - orange bell bot- toms, a new long navy skirt (I'd bought it thinking it was black), and a funky necklace. Last year for her birth- day I wrote: "At 18, lovely'Little'Molly is all grown up And she's blessed with a brimming cup From the Father, family, friends and an,. We rejoice that college beckons in the fall Where she'll concentrate on higher learning That will help satisfy her yearning To use her talents, intel- lect and zest To multiply the effort and labor for the best." She'll soon be returning for her second year at Stanford, having spent a cou- il;!!!i/i:i  V .4U ii pie of months this summer in Ecuador, as a UGA intern. An interesting picture album details some of her experiences - the people, ani- mals and flora. One year when she was in Maine, Molly introduced her classmates to her fried green tomatoes. In Ecuador she pre- pared peanut butter and honey french toast for 40 peo- ple - with only one skillet! Pictures show the native cooks lovingly hugging Molly. Molly wants me to come again before she leaves, so we can prepare some new dishes from recipes she's acquired. Meanwhile I've mailed her and her mother pages from a magazine showing colorful scarecrows. They need one for their vegetable garden. However, the flower garden is flourish- ing with a large variety of blooming plants. When I left the next morn- ing, I "detoured" by the DeKalb Farmers Market where I enjoyed a lunch of some unique food choices. Purchases were also made from the bakery department. I was due home no later than 1:30, since I was committed to drive my neighbor, Evelyn, as she kept appointments for more than three hours. The following day would include time to rake pine straw and cut the grass. I also enjoyed a brief visit from grandson Dean. Family and friends keep the days full and rewarding. Who Is Really Paying for Drugs? I stopped by for lunch at a favorite restaurant in North Atlanta last week. I love the food there but another thing I like about the place is the close proximity of all the tables. In other words I get to eavesdrop and I like to do that. Done discreetly, one learns a lot. Many of you know I was a nurse for 18 years until 1986 when I changed careers. There were many reasons I left nursing as there are re_any reasons many nurses have left and are leaving nursing. such a time to think about what we all have come to know over the years about the real practice of medicine. I first began to be turned off to the role as soon as I first glimpsed what would come to be called "managed care." But there were and are other things that irritate me about American medicine. *FOR INSTANCE, rm sit- ting at the table at the little restaurant when two women and a man are seated at the table next to me. One woman excuses her- self and goes to the bathroom. Small talk ensues. The young woman: I'm babysitting tonight while my sister and her husband goes to Chateau Elan for the week- end. The man: That's strange my wife is already up there for the weekend. The young woman: What a coincidence. My sister's husband is a doctor and they are going there compliments of a drug company." I'D HEARD enough. Reminders came flooding in, other forgotten reasons I became so turned off to work- ing in the healthcare profes- sion. -ns the american way, I suppose. If we can sell our product any other way then we just try to bribe folks into giving it a try. Now, I'm not say?3ag that doctor will prescribe a drug because the company who makes it gives him a week- end at a resort. Maybe he's smart enough to take advantage of the offer and still think for himself. But I'm smart enough to know somebody is paying for those weekends, or those free lunches, or fancy little pens or gadgets that remind the doctor of the product. That somebody is, more than likely, the patient who is ultimately given the drug. Oops, did I say "given?" The one for whom the drug is prescribed, the employer for whom he or she works, and the insurance company through which that person's health insurance is provided if he or she is lucky enough to have insurance, or the government if Medicare or Medicaid is a player and, in that case, we are down to Joe and Mary Taxpayer foot- 'q0000at somebody is, more than like- ly, the patient who is ultimately given thedrug." hag the bill. That then would be you and me who are helping to pay for that resort weekend. It just doesn't set well, does it? Now check this out. A University of Michigan team of health researchers are pro- posing this prescription for drug dilemmas: tailor the copayment to the patient. In other words those who could benefit most from med- icines should pay the least, or even get paid, under new plan. Here's the thought in a nutshell behind the idea. In recent years, most Americans with prescription drug coverage in their health insurance have gotten used to shelling out just a few dol- lars each time they go to the pharmacy - a small "eopay- menf' set by insurers to cover part of the prescription. This attractive benefit has allowed many easy access to drugs that enhance their health, and has earned the envy of those - including mil- lions of seniors on Medicare - who pay for their drugs out of pocket. Meanwhile, though, some insurers are raising their copays to offset the recent dramatic rise in drug spend- ing. But now, evidence is mounting that rising copays are becoming too much for some people to afford, even as medical research increas- ingly shows the clinict,ben- e fits of many drugs. - All of this means the time is right, says a team of University of Michigan health researchers, for new "benefit-based" copays that will help get medications to those who need them most, and ultimately may help make prescription drug cov- erage available to more peo- ple. Under the benefit-based copay, or BBC, some people would pay less than others, and those most likely to ben- efit might even get paid to take their medicine. The question still remains: Who is really pay- ing for the drug and how much are we all actually pay- ing? Mary Jane Holt is a syn- dicated columnist who lives in Meriwether County. YoU can write to her at PO BoX 246, Gay, GA 30218. Reasons Why We to Church past week ask the same ques- tion: just why did we go to the church? Sad but true, there are many that go to church for the same reasons that the person in our story revealed. There are many who go just to see or tobe seen. Why is it that we do go to God's house or may I ask, why should we go to church? We know that the Word of God commands every believer to be faithful to the public assembling of the saints of God (Hebrews 10:25). Our primary purpose for coming to the Lord's house is to worship our Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ. The word worship literally means to depress and it refers to lay- ing oneself prostrate. The word worship tells us that we are to make ourselves low and to lift him up. It means to give the honor, the praise, and the glory that is due our Lord. But, many times when we attend church, we are caught up in everything except the Lord. I'm not necessarily speaking of things that are intrinsically evil, but good things that we have allowed to distract us from our real purpose of assembling. When a child of God enters the house of God, how can he be sure that he will properly worship the Savior? If a per- son would look in the Old Testament book of Nehemiah and chapter nine, he would find three things that would help them to be focused on the Savior rather than other things. In Nehemiah, we find the city of Jerusalem in ruins and the man Nehemiah rebuilding the walls and repairing the gates. After just fifty-two days the walls and gates were finished. Then the real work begins. The nation having been in captivity for seventy years needs their worship restored. Ezra the scribe comes on the scene and we find the nation of God wor- shipping again. The three things about these people with a renewed focus upon the God of Heaven are three things that will enable us to go to church for Several years ago, I read a story about a man and his wife who had just been to church and they were now on their way home. During the short drive home the husband and wife began to have a somewhat one-sided conversation, and it went something like this. The wife lqked over to her husband and asked if he saw who sister so and so was sit- ring with. The husband replied that he really didn notice. Again, the wife leaned over and asked her husband if he noticed that the "Joneses" were driving a brand new Cadillac. The husband, after just a moment of thought, answered that he did not see that either. Almost home, the wife at the point of frustra- tion, asked another question of her husband. She asked ff he paid any attention to the fact the preacher had on another brand new suit. Again, the husband answered he had not noticed. The wife, now fully frustrated and aggravated, asked in a huff, "Well, then just why did you go to church?" May we that found our- self in the house of God this the right reason. I briefly mention these things. These people had an attitude of humility. Pride has no place in the house of God or in the life of a believer. When a per- son is centered upon himself and his wants, he will not be focused upon the Savior. Secondly, these people had an action of holiness. They separated them- selves from the world around them (separation does not mean isolation) and con- fessed sin. In short, they puri- fied themselves, because a child of God cannot truly wor- ship with unconfessed sin nor with the traces of the world upon them. Finally, we find these people could focus upO0 their God because they hao an assembly of harmony. We cannot focus on Jesus while consumed with jealousy or grudges. We cannot focus o Jesus, while focused on otlv ers. The worship of indivi& ual believers should be as o offering of praise, honor, glory and reverence to tl risen Lord. Before we walk into the doors of our church house tl 'tt appointed time, let ourself the question: Wlff am I here today?