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Manchester, Georgia
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October 19, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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October 19, 2000
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - OCTOBER 19, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS Millard B. Gdmes, President USPS 62O-04O MmJ Pu BLtSi r}:R/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KtT,E.NDALL ./%OC IATE PUBLISHER]EDITOR BRYAN GETER ASS(X'IATE EDITOR JANE GOLDSON B USINVFS ]/!ANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 ltogansvdle, Georgia 30230 Chili Dogs: Always Barking at Class Strip Search Can't Be Forgotten Sometimes, people make snap : decisions only to learn later the , decision they made was not only the wrong ond, but also a very bad one. That is probably what the principal of a Missouri elemen- tary school is thinking right about now. Tuesday, October 3 was show- and-tell day at Adrian Elementary School in Adrian, Missouri, and one foffrth-grader brought in a war medal to share with the class. When the medal suddenly turned up missing, the principal ordered the fourth-graders to strip to their underwear and a search began. One-by-one, the students were ordered into the restroom to strip to their under- wear to be patted down in the hunt for the missing medal. When the medal was found later on a classroom floor, the principal apologized to the stu- dents and bought them all soft drinks. However, the parents of the children could not be molli- fied so easily. According to reports, the par- ents are livid and have asked the Board of Education to reprimand the principal, Wallace Hendrickson. They are also seek- ing an apology framhool offi- cials and the establishment of a school district policy on student searches. The parents contacted the American Civil Liberties Union, which has sent a letter to school officials alleging that the pupils' civil rights have been violated. The ACLU is considering legal action. Parents say the children were traumatized "emotionally, physi- cally, and illegally," and cited court cases protecting children against unreasonable searches at school. The school system has said it is investigating the incident and will take action if it deems that an improper search was conduct- ed. At the time of the incident, apparently the only thing on the mind of the principal was recov- ering the missing medal. If the facts were known, it probably was taken by one of the students and when it was announced they would be searched, they most likely threw the medal to the floor to keep it from being found on their person. Under this hypoth- esis, the search did the trick, but it has proved to be costly for the principal. USING HINDSIGHT, the principal would probably handle the same situation differently today. However, there is no way he can change what has been done. The principal will most like- ly not only be reprimanded, but also transferred if possible or even fired. If so, he did this to himself. I cannot imagine any ele- mentary principal conducting a strip search on students at that age. Imagine being nine or ten years old and being told to strip to your underwear in front of strangers ! - - There is no doubt the princi- pal did not think this through very well. I would agree with the par- ents in this situation, the strip search was wrong. There were other ways this could have been dealt with I'm sure. Unfortunately' for the princi- pal, an apology will not be enough. For the kids, this is certainly an experience they will' never for- get. If it will affect them emo- tionally or mentally remains to be seen I guess, but I for one don't think it will. Being involved in youth sports as a coach and my experience with my own children has taught me that children get over things like this much faster than adults do. A week from now, those chil- dren will be laughing, playing and back to their old selves. The par- ents, however, won't get over this for some time, and as a parent, I can understand why they're angry. What's Your opinion? We gladly welcome letters to the editor/ Ttm HOC;ANS HOM Nws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subscription rates by mdl: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230. FoR mlrrlor, ca call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications. E O. Box 426. Manchester, Georgia 31816. : Send address changes to E O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor. ............................................................... .John KuykendaIl Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan GcwJ" Assis "umt Editor ............................................................................................ Rob Richardson Business Manager ............ : .......................................................................... 3ayne Goldston Staff Writers ....................................................................... Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ................................................................................................. Loft Camp Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith. Lauren King Legais ............................................................................................................ Jayne Ooidston Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager .............................................................................................. Todd Laird Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski CORORKrE O'lCmS President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................... ............. Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel aad Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. Grimes If you're addicted to drugs or alcohol, you can go someplace like the Betty Ford Clinic and get help. But where do you go if you're addicted to chili dogs? Yes, chili dogs. Those won- derful hot dogs with lots of chili on them and mustard and onions on the chili that the mere men- tion of makes my mouth water, my heart rate speed up, and my stomach literally beg to be fed as many of these delights as it can hold. I had my first chili dog when I was 12. My father took me to Atlanta's legendary Varsity, the world's largest outdoor drive-in. My father ordered me a chili dog, I took the first bite of it, and I was hooked. During my three years in exile in Chicago, I formulated a scheme to get chili dogs from the Varsity delivered to me. I started dating a girl I met on a trip back home to Atlanta. Every other week I would fly her to Chicago. "And would you mind," I would ask, "stopping by the Varsity on your way to the air- port and bringing me fourteen dozen chili dogs?" "It's me or the chili dogs," she eventually said. I often wonder what ever happened to her. I HAD HEART surgery in 1982. The doctors said I could have anything I wanted to eat for my pre-operation dinner. I sent for Varsity chili dogs. Had I died under the knife the next day, at least I would have had a satisfying last meal. For years I've tried to decide why Varsity chili dogs remain the best I've ever eaten. The hot dogs are good and so is the chili, but it's the buns that really do it. The Varsity, some- body was telling me, steams its buns. There's nothing better than a steamy bun. But I must admit my chili dog addiction is becoming a problem. I can't eat them like I used to and not pay a painful price. The other night, for instance, I went to the Varsity and had three chili dogs with mustard and raw onions. I also had an order of french fries and I topped that off with a Varsity fried apple pie with ice cream on it. I went to bed at 11. The chili dogs hit at about two. MY STOMACH FELT like I had eaten a large box of nails. It made strange sounds like goooorp! And brriiipt I got out of bed, took six Rolaids, two Alka-Seltzers and drank a six-pack of Maalox. "I went to bed at 11. The chili dogs hit at about two." Nothing helped. I'll never eat another chili dog, I said to myself. Those addicted to any sub- stance often say things like that, but they rarely stick to it. I know I'll be back at the Varsity soon, woofing down ch dogs. And, later, the agony and the goooorfs and brriiips will be back. My stomach and I simply will have to learn to live tain fact. That is at night. BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LEWIS GRIZZARD UP IN NEARBY AND BECAME THE WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS GRIZZARD BELONGED ALL AMERICA BUT HE TICULARLY BELONGED THIS AREA OF GEORGIA, WHICH HE WROTE SO AND WHERE 85 FROM NEWNAN HOGANSVILLE IS HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD MUSEUM IN 1996, AND A EDITING LAB IS ICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED OF GEORG BOOKS AVAILABLE FOR THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS P.O. 191266, GA 1266ANDATl STORES NATIONWIDE. Daisy Bonner: FDR's Personal Cook After dinner at the Irwins, there would be singing by Fred Botts - who had once aspired to a career in grand opera - or group singing, almost always including "Home on the Range," which was popularly but incorrectly sup- posed to be Roosevelt's favorite. Wherever he visited, he was greet- ed by it. on friends he would xpress  -'rt;,lr Gawd! -- as the familiar first notes were hit. The party broke up again, with some guests going to a party at Cottage 13, where the female members of the White House trav- eling staff were quartered, or to te cottage where the press made its headquarters, or to someone else's home for further revelry well into the evening. Sometimes journalists would turn their writing abilities to fun, and the early morning hours would include skits and song parodies of somewhat more originality than the President's WPA joke. ROOSEVELT APPARENTLY hked Brunswick stew, usually a dish of one or two such meats as chicken, squirrel, veal, pork, plus corn and beans or onions in a very thick tomato sauce. He apparent- ly did not like the Georgia version of barbecue, pork cooked over an open smoky fire and basted fre- quently in a vinegary, spicy toma- to sauce. His own cook at the Little White House was Daisy Bonner, a Georgian who worked for the Peabodys and then the Irwins when the President wasn't in Warm Springs. She knew simple country Georgia fare and also the more sophisticated dishes her employers liked. Roosevelt's favorite Georgian recipe was her version of Country Captain, a chicken dish. He told everybody, falsely, that her recipe was a secret, with 45 ingredients, which was a joke between Roosevelt and Daisy. Even when he was busy at Warm Springs, he was recharging his batteries. He was relaxing. When he would go back to Washington, it was the rest and fun that he remembered, not the work. On March 30, 1937, he chat- ted with reporters at a White House press conference after a visit to Warm Springs. In 14 days there he had made a nationwide radio address, hosted the Prime Minister of Canada, visited a new community house in the village (named after his mother), dedi- cated a school (named after his wife), made other speeches, fol- lowed closely the fight in Congress over his Supreme Court plan and conducted other business. "She knew simple country Georgia fare and also the more sophisticated dishes her employers But he recalled none of that. "That was a grand party down there this year," he said to the reporters who had traveled south with'him. "It was a real holiday. It was the best holiday I ever had at Warm Springs because I didn't do one damn thing." WARM SPRINGS not only introduced Roosevelt to shine, it also introduced pork barbecue, Brunswick fried chicken  the staples larger get-togethers in the A typical uch luncheon Roosevelt and 50 local citizen s held at the Civilian Corps camp near Warm on that March 1937 Mrs.NealKitchensvere the] The MexLwther cue was most enjoyable, by reason of its simplicitY lack of formality as any cause. Matter of fact passed between the his friends, j ly a common neighbor (Next week: The picnics DowdeU's Knob.) 'THE SQUIRE OF OF WARM SPRINGS AT THE GIFr SHOP AT TI I TLE WHITE HOUSE. IT TAINS ALL OF THE PER DURIN( SALE ALL GO TO THE SEVELT CENTER. A Penchant, Hobby...or Obsession? Just about as coordinated as could be desired! The pearl gray handbag would never need the backpack straps, so they were cut off. There was only about a three- inch inconspicuous space behind a faux flap where the residue of the strap was visible. For 25 a length of pretty matching braid was bought. THE SALESLADY taped both ends to prevent raveling. Therefore, I coated the braid with clear-drying glue before cutting it to fit. The braid was then glued into the crevice to make the alteration complete and totally acceptable. It was an entirely unexpect- ed.encounter with a great sale. The enticing newspaper ad had not been seen that touted a "Singer Blowout." However, my first stop, as I did errands at work, was at Lindberg Plaza for watch repair. Right there was the big sale sign. Inside, people were checking out new boxed Sewing machines in one line. The other lines were for fabric, comforters and cloth- ing. Many shopping carts were piled high with selections. Not wanting to spend much time - I was in the middle of mending or altering nine gar- ments for Molly - I headed to the clothing section. There, new items, many with big or McCall tops giving numbers and fabric tions, were arranged. All seemed to be size If cost $1.00. I limited five:selections - a very pink pants suit and a blouse with coordinating and black vest that I'll wear a 10ng black skirt. THE REMAINING I withothers in mind, n't fit. Mona gave me a one because she wanted the I buttons. I may keep another the fifth will be donated. The views expressed on the opinion Page of the Hogansville Home News are the expressions and ideas of each writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the management" Essentially, we collect because something appeals to us. Maybe it's just too appealing or interesting to pass up. Advice from entertainer Marie Osmond, "Simply collect what you like - maybe with some consideration to its value." Consciously I do not collect anything, but the num- bers of brooches and earrings seem to grow. From time to time when coor- dinating earrings are needed, I go through my trove of bargain buys and usually find something useable. My ears are not pierced, but I buy either clip or pierced. The crinkle cotton hot pink top had been altered, as had the black crepe pants printed in hot pink flowers and green leaves. While searching, hot pink square earrings were found that had slightly higher outside edges. Heavy black cardboard with a ridge design was cut to fit into and glued onto the squares. From a white pair of hoops, an embroidered hot pink fabric flower with green leaves was lift- ed from each and glued onto the black.