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Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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October 21, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
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October 21, 2004
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 620.04o JOHN Kt~KENDALL ~BIJSHERfEDITOR LAt~ ADVERTISING DIRECTOR ~ CLaYSm~oK ASSOC~TE EDrroR ROB 1~~ ASSIS'rANT EDrroR m B. c,~lm, ~u~kmt Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846,2206 P. O. Box 426 Hopmvine, ~ 3o23o Deer, Oh Dear!! Over the years, I've had my run-ins on the road with deer. The ftrst time I hit a deer with a car, it just happened to be a new one my wife and I had purchased only a cou- ple of weeks earlier. I was driving along, minding my own business and this deer leaps off a bank and strikes the hood of the Dodge I was driving. The insurance company estimated the damage to the car at about $2,500. A couple of years later, I was driving home one night and this deer came out of nowhere onto the highway. I dodged him, but I couldn't dodgetheother twothat came bounding out of the woods behind him. Well over $1,000 in damages. A couple of years ago, a deer came running out of the woods and struck the side of my pickup in thedriver's side door. It buckled and again, almost $1,000 in dan-,ages. Of course in every inci- dent, I had to pay a deductible on my insurance. So, it cost me money as well as my insurance provider. Everyone that lives in this ~ea knows that. it's onlya tter of Re before they have a wreck that is going to involve a deer. I write the police news for most of our newspapers and I can tell you, more accidents on the highway are caused by people hitting deer, attempt- ing to avoid a collision with a deer, or some other reason that involves a deer. I was attending a deer nmns_gement meeting a cou- ple of years ago and was told by a Natural Resources offi- cer that the reason most peo- ple hit deer is that they are driving too fast and can't stop. I do not believe that to be true for one minute. Case in point, all total I've had four, maybe five, acci- dents involving deer in my lifetime. Knock on wood, but I've never had a speeding ticket. So, if only people speeding have accidents that involve a deer, why have I had so many? HERE ARE the facts: The nation's deer popula- tion is growing and each year, car collisions with deer account for more than 150 human and nearly one and a half million deer fatalities. October through December is the highest season for the accidents, since it's a time for both wandering deer and hol- iday travelers. Most collisions with a deer occur during this time of year when deer are mat- ing and migrating. It is also important to remember that deer are most ac~ve during the hours from dawn until dusk, That is also the time for most traffic. An adult deer can weigh 200 pounds or more and a car striking one can not only result in the death of the deer, but also incur, on average, two thousand dollars in dam- age to the vehicle. Here are a few precau- tions drivers can take to help prevent accidents with deer. Be particularly careful at dawn and dusk and when driving either over a hill or around a curve, where visi- bility is limited. Use your high beams to give you a greater area of visibility and allows you to see the deers' eyessooner. Scan a wide swathof the roadside. Slow down ~ching a near the side of a road and be prepared.lfstartled, the deer can bolt onto the roadway and into your path. If necessary, honk your horn and flash your lights to try and scare it away. Be alert for more deer than you may see at that moment. Where there's one deer, there are often more nearby. Deer whistles or ultra- sonic deer avoidance sys- tems attached to vehicles have never been proven to work by independent studies and may give drivers a false sense of security. In many cases it is best not to swerve around the deer since the deer may move in , the~same direction. You may ',,also inadvertently hit anotl~ ~r vehicle, or gO off onto a da~ous shoulder. Unless of ~ road factors, it is o(ten best to simply brake ~mradfiCcbc.-~n, finue in yur lane f Take deer crossing signs seriously, particularly those installed specifically for this time of year. Be particularly cautious in wooded and agri- cultural areas where there is little distance between the road and the woods. Well, that's about all the advice I can give. So remem- ber, as it was always said on the police show "Chips,', take to the road, but please be care- ful out there. j:,,,,,,,, ,,, , , , ,, Tm~ HO~ASSVlLL~ HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercu~ Publishing Company, a div'~ o~Grimes Publication~ at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040, Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Mcdw~ Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical po~_~e paid at Hogansviile, ~ 30230.Single copy 50. FoR st~sc~ call (706) 846-3188 0 write to ~ Manager. S~ Me,tory Publications, R O. Box 426, Manchester, ~ 31816. Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hog~nsville, GA 30230. STAFF Publishe~ and Editor ....................................................................... ,.Jotm Kukyendall Adverting Director ............................................................................... ~ Lewis Editor ...: ........................................................... : .................. .Oint Claybv::x)k Assistm~ Editor .............................................................................. ,,.,.Rob Richardson StaffWrilers ......................................................................... .Bry~m Get~, Billy Bryant .............................. IX, way~ Flowers, Robert Wwm~ C_.~-'i Youn~ Ci~ulatio~ Manager .......................... : ................................................ Tract Lynn Wyatt Press Manager ................................................................................. Wayne Caochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................................... Zaddie Dixon,Damc!l McCauley Mailmom Dis~.... ........................................................................... David Boggs Com~z ~ Pn~side/~ ....... : .................................................................................... Millard B. C-rimes W~e Preside~ ................................................................................. Chadotte S. wes Executive Vice President and Secretary ................. : ...................... ~ Csimcs Cder Treasurer ............. ~ ........................................................................ Kathy Grim~ C.mn'eu Legal Counsel and ~ ~ ............. : ........................ :......James S. i ii i i i . 4-A - HOGANSVnJ, HOME NEWS OCT. 21, 2004 I had been involved at the Alps Road Drive-In the pre- vious spring. "Married," I said, in a sur- prisingly timid manner. Classes had begun for my jun- ior year at Georgia. I was quite proud of my wedding band. It made me feel very adult. Every time I looked at it, I thought of Paula. Why, then, was I acting like I had done something foolish? "You're a fool," said the coed. "I love my wife," I said. "Is she pregnant?" "No, she isn't pregnant." "Then why did you marry her?" "I told you, I love her." "That's no reason to marry her." "It's not?" "Of course, it's not. How old are you anyway?" "Nineteen." "Nineteen? You are a fool I sat around all summer wait- ing for fall quarter to see you again, and you go off and get manded." I put my hand, the one with the ring, into my pock- et, "You're going to miss out __ . "e! Wedding Band Attracts oppormmti of / Jenkins had said the same gypsy. She began to flirt thing. I suddenly felt a little me shamelessly. sick to my stomach. WE TOOK A small apart- ment after we were married. I had a night job. She worked days. We met for lunch each day at our apartment. We ate a lot of frozen fish eticks. I hadn't counted on a cou- ple of things that happened after I got married. One, there were suddenly opportunities that had never presented themselves before. Where were all these young women, who suddenly seemed quite interested in me, before I got married? Perhaps they thought I was harmless now, or perhaps it is the nature of the female to tease the chained male. THERE WAS THIS blond in my political science class, for example. She had the face of an angel and a body that bedeviled my imagination. We had been assigned seats next to one another in the classroom. She smiled at me. She asked me ff she could bor- row my extra pen. I think our hands may have touched when I handed it to her. ':..Where were all these young women, who sud- denty seemeA quite interested in me, before I got mar- ried?" Oh, what I could do with this vision of loveliness, I thought to myself. But where had she been all last year and the year before? For two years of college, I'd been sur- rounded by nothing but Home Ec majors who made their" own clothes, and female flute players with hairy legs. So I go off and get married, and what happens? An obviously hot-to-trot thoroughbred is asking me to borrow a pen. A new girl came to work. / "What time is it?" sl~~ asked me one night in a loW,~ sexy whisper. ~ "Quarter to nine," I replied, looking squarely into her deep black eyes. 'q'hat late, huh?" she said, in an obvious come-on. The frustration began build in ] a fool to get married. I waS only 19, for God's Everywhere I looked, was some young thing lick- ing her lips, or asking me for the time, and what could I do about it? ;..to be continued week BY S~CL~ ~G~ wrm ms moow, il HOME NEWS IS CARRYING ~/ ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE LEW~ ~ WHO GREW UP IN NFAIg" BY MORELAND, AND BECAME TI~ MOST WIDELY READ GEORGIA WFdTE~ OF HIS TIME. GRIZZARlY$ BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL AVAII~ ABLE FOR SALETHROUGHBADBOO~ PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX 191266, ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND AT BOOK AND MUSIC STORES NATION" WIDE. Great Job on Festival, Hogansville The 2004 version of the Hogansville Hummingbird. Festival has been declared by just about everybody associated withit - includ- ing the vendors and those who turned out to enjoy last weekend's heautiful weath- er, free concerts and the tra- ditional Festival Kick-off Dinner and Silent Auction - a major success. ,, The heneficAazie~ will be the citizens of Hogansville because, as always, the prof- its will go to improving the city's infrastructure - the renovation of the old Royal Theater and the Streetscape Project that have already done much to improve the appearance and the function of the downtown area come most quickly to mind. Councilman Jack Leidner pointed out this week that changes in the city's sidewalks to make them more friendly to the handicapped have led to dis- missal of a Justice Department-planned law- suit against the city. The Hummingbird Festival, over several years, helped provide the local money that secured the grant for Phase I of the Streetscape Project. THE CITY'S STREETS were teeming with people over the weekend: Some esti- mates put the two-day total turn-out at ll,000-plus, an increase of at least 2,000over "..The city's streets were teem- in g with people over the weekend..." the 2003 estimates. Major additions to the festival this year were the free concerts at the Hogansville Amphitheatre, and the practically all-day entertainment on Saturday and Sunday at the pavilion in Hipp Memorial Park added more spark to the fes- tivities. The concerts at the amphitheare were excellent examples of what the city's leadership, with valuable help'from arts lovers in Hogansville can accomplish for the city and its residents. We agree with Councilwoman Jean Crocker." Everybody ated with the deserves recognition thanks for a job well done. 50 Years Ago,,, lnthe Hogansville Herald A GOOD TRADITION- Among the articles on the front page of the Oct. 21 Hogansville Herald was a piece on the gid scouts collecting food for the needy. "As is the annual custom at this time of year, the Hogansville Girl Scouts will stage their annual trick or treat invasion of the residence section of the city one night next week." The scouts would collect "cans of vegeta- bles, fruit, etc. for the needy." AUTOMOTIVE MILESTONE - In the 1950s, October was when America's three major auto makers debuted their new models. And excitement was high in HogansviHe. Hines Motor Company was planning the official unveiling of the 1955 Chevrolets, with "workmen busy all week remodeling the show room. A large door has been cut into the front of the sales room so that new cars can be ddven into the store." Unbeknownst at that time was that the 1955 Chevy would become one of the most popular cars of all time, W~ some of the more perfectly-restored selling for over $100,000 in 2004. CINEMA TIME - Movies showing at the Royal Theatre that week included Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis in "Living It Up," "Riders to the Stars," "Wicked Woman," "Crazy Legs," "Marshall of Cedar Rock" and "Magnificent Obsession." "BARGAINS OF~ THE 50S McConnelrs 5&10 offered boys' long sleeve polo shirts for $.49, plaid flan- nel shirts for $1, one dozen diapers for $1.77, anklets for $.15 per pair and a pound of orange slices for $.10. WANT AD WONDERS - "60,000 BTU Upright Oil Furnace. Will trade for good cow, calf or pig or what have you."