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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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October 23, 2009     The Hogansville Herald
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October 23, 2009
 

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& PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - FRIDAY, OCT. 23, 2009 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS LISPS 62O-O40 (6rimr l uhlkafimt Millard B. Grimes, Pc~fidora JOHN K~ALL PtmLZSrmR/EDrrOR LALrRIE LEWIS ADVERTISING DIRECTOR ROB I~CHARDSON ASSOCIATE EDITOR ANDY KOBER ASSISTANT EDITOR . = Phone (706) 846-3188- Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Manchester. Georgia 31816 Man what a wonderful age for the telephone indus- try. We have cell phones, we have visual conference call- ing, and you name it. Sometimes technology can go too far before it s ready and I'm a firm believer that the modern telephones might fit the bill. There are several things I hate about cell phones, but topping them all is sounding like the Verizon Wireless commercial. Here is how one of my typical conversations goes when I use my cell phone. "Hey, how are you?" "What? You were break- ing up." "I said, how are you?" ~_;::~ ICed hear me now?" "Yes. I was calling because".... (pop, crackle, siz- zle). "What?" "Yeu didn't hear me?" Czm you hear me now?" "Yes." "I was calling because..." Signal lost .... no bars. OF COURSE trying to m:~:< a phc~ne call to a busi- lleSs, do t r*s:' r:::any mes- saging systems is just as bad. Those conversations nor- mally go like this. "Thmlk you for calling Dr. XYZ's office. If this is a med- ical emergency please hang up and dial 911. If this is a hospital, please dial one. If this is a pharmacy please, dial two. All other 'callers please remain on the line and listen to the following options because our menu has changed. "For our office hours, please dial 21. For directions to our office, please dial 22. For medical records, dial 23. For prescription refill infor- mation, dial 24. To make an appointment, dial 25." "Thank God!" you sere.am and dial 25. "I'm sorry, I did not understand your request. Please dial the extension you wish to reach now." BuRon sounds again and then you get .... "I'm sorry, all of our rep- resentatives are either on another line or helping other callers. "Your call is very impor- tant to us, please remain on the line for the first available representative." Dead silence for a few minutes. Then, "Your call is very important to us, please remain on the line for the first available representative." After about 15 minutes of this nonsense we all get frus- trated and dial "0." Finally a real life voice comes on the line. "Thank you for calling Dr. XYZ's office. How may I help you?" "I need to make an appointment." "Yes sir, please hold." Click. Music for a few minutes and then... "Your call is very important to us, please remain on the line for the first available representative." Another 10 minutes go by. "Thank you for holding. How may I help you?" "I need to make an appointment, my name is..." "Date of birth please?" "April 17, 1917." "Hold please." "Social security number please?" .... "XXX-XX-XXXX .. I ..... Jut h sec6dd"sii:: ' Silence. "Hello, Mr. Kuykendall. How can I help you today?" "I need to make an appointment." "Hold please." Music for a few minutes. "I'm sorry to keep you holding but I had to access the computer to see what dates are available. We can see you three weeks from now on Thursday at 5 p.m." "Is that the first available appaintment?" "Yes sir. I'm sorry. If you feel you need immediate med- ical attention I can recom- mend an after hours clinic." "No, I've been on the tele- phone so long I'm all better now. Thanks anyway." I DON'T have a solution to the problem, because that is just modern technology at work. We have all moved into the computer age. A comput- er is cheaper labor than a real live person. However, I can give you a tip on how to get in touch with you credit card representative. Just stop pay- ingl When they call, answer the phone like this... "Thanks for calling the home of John Doe. Your call is very important to us. If you know your party's extension, please dial it now. If not, please remain on the line for our next available represen- tative." Till( HO(;ANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the ~tar-Mercury PuNishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 642-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansvilie. Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FoR SU~SCRWnONS call (706) 8463188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications. R O. Box 426. Manchester. Georgia 31816. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Manchester. GA 31816. StAir Publisher and Editor. ........................................................................... John Kukyendall Adve~sing Director .................................................................................. Laurie Lewis Associate Edilor: .................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff Writers ..................................................... Andy Kober, Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Composition ....................................................................................... Dewayne Flowers Press Manager. .................................................................................. Lawrence Colleges PressAssistant .................................................................................... Darnell McCauley Circulation Distribution ................................................................... WayneGrochowski COnPOnATE OmCEnS President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ................................................ Laura E Grimes Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garretl Legal CounseLand Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Aunt Dolly called me to et. He had no identification. tell me Daddy was drinking He had no money. again. A nurse called me in "He started drinking lastAtlanta and said a man had week and wouldn't quit. been admitted to the hospital "I said, 'Major, I don't carrying a letter that had my allow drinking in my house, name and address on the My children just wouldn'tenvelope. stand for it. I identified him as my "He said he didn't care father and asked what the about my children, that he matter with him was. was going to drink. I tried to She said he had a stroke take his bottle away from him, and that he was in critical con- and he threatened me. dition. "I just don't know about My wife and I had only anything like that, so I called recently separated. the sheriff and he came and I was still in our house. I got him." called Uncle John Wesley, "Is he in jail?" I asked.Daddy's brother. "I don't know," she said.He said he would ride with "That was last night. I haven't me to Claxton. It was a four heard anything from him hour drive from Atlanta. since." We .got in at two in the I called the sheriff's morning. The night nurse let office, us into Daddy's room. "We just kept him She said he was in a semi- overnight," I was told. coma, whatever that is. "He got out this morning. I saw the bruises on his I don't know where he went." face and head. I knew he was He went to Claxton. He - going to die. started drinking again. Uncle John Wesley and I He was walking down a checked intoa motel. I called street in Claxton when he col- Aunt DollyinPembroketotell lapsed, her where Daddy was. "My daughter is driving in SOME PEOPLE saw him from California to take me fall. They called the police, away," she said. who came and tried to revive "You're not coming to the him. hospital?" I asked her. They said he had bruisesShe said she wasn't on his head, as if someone had I told her I thought Daddy hit him. was dying. The policemantookhimto "My daughter told me not the hospital. How the hospi: tO go near the Major again," tal found me was from the let- she said sadly. ter I had written him. I asked if she knew any- It was in his jacket pock- thing about the bruises on Daddy's head and face. "I think he slipped in the tub," she said. We stayed in Claxton with Daddy for four days. There was no change in his condition. He remained uncon- scious. The doctor said the stroke --had been massive. I asked about the bruises. "We think he probably got them when he fell from the stroke," the doctor said. Uncle John Wesley said it looked like somebody had beaten him up. "He probably got drunk and somebody rolled him for what ever money he had," was his explanation. After the four days, we realized there was nothing more we could to at the hos- pital. Uncle John Wesley, then in his late sixties, needed to get back to work. "I still mess with a few old used cars now and then," he said. WE DROVE back through a rainstorm. I had never been close to my uncle. I liked him, though. He always wore a big hat and smoked one Camel after another. His fingers were yel- low from the several thou- sand miles of smoke that had passed over them. He was a wise old man who lived into his eighties. He became the quintes- sential Grizzard to me. He was big, like all the Grizzards. He had his own brand of wit, dryer then my father's but perhaps more thoughtful. "I never sold a car to a man who didn't deserve it," he said once. On the way back to Atlanta he said what I had wanted to say. He said something that took the guilt I had thinking death was the only hope Daddy had left. Uncle John Wesley said, "He don't deserve no more hell" ...to be continued next week BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT WITHHISWIDOW, DEDRA, THEHOME NEWS IS CARRYING SELECTED C~)LUMNS BY THE LATE LEWIS GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN NEAR- BY MORELAND, AND BECAME THE MOST WIDELY READ GEORGIA WRITER OF HIS TIME. GRIZZARD'S BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL AVAIL- ABLE FORSALETHROUGH BADBOOT PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX 191266, ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266. Over the past couple of Restaurant. We always left a weeks, I have enjoyed thelittle early in order to have opportunity to,urn back the time to eat at Yoder's, andwas ct o k ff foralitflewhiIe'. " it o0d! Just ask-Harris ye~sag0thati c0veredacon- Bridges aS i~e ~;&s~als0 a r6[: siderable number of high ularvisit'or there. school sports. In fact, at times it seemedas though Vicki and WHILE basketball is I were constantly going some- played inside, that sport can where to cover some sport- present its own challenges, nowhere for those noxious ing event and just having We have covered state fumes to go, they began to been involved again brought playoff games held at Morris spread. back some memories. Brown; Georgia Tech and the The officials stopped the We traveled some very CentrePlex in Macon. Onegame long enough for doors long distances tocoverfoot- year I was covering two tobeopenedandthegymven- ball. I have worked in rain, teams, one playing A division tilated. cold temperatures, and I and the other AA division. seem to recall getting pelted Both teams made the state WHILE covering a base- by ice pellets somewhere. I playoffs. For a week, we had ball game, I was looking covered one game when it to drive to Macon and back through the camera lens, was so cold that Vicki, our every night, focused on the batter. There daughter Tara, and another I was covering a basket- was a sharp crack of the bat high school student were all ball game and had positioned and I instinctively ducked. huddledunderablanketinthe myself toward the gym's Good thing, too, as the base- stands trying to keep warm. lobby. I was trying to get a ball went uncomfortably I covered a game during good photograph when sud- close to where my head had which a severe thunderstorm denly there was a sharp, pun- been. struck. Lightning was dane- gent odor and my eyes began During a soccer game, I ing across the sky. The fans tostingandburn.Iknewwhathad a referee tell me to quit left.Iduckedunderthestands that smell was and headed taking photographs with a and could not believe the offi- toward the other end of the flash. The coach of the losing cials were not stopping the gym. One of the game offi- team had complained that I game. Then I suddenly real- cials had caught a whiff and was distracting his players. izedthatIwasstandingunder came to me asking what it Well, based on the lopsided metal stands with lightning was.Itoldhim-pepper spray, score, his players were dis- popping around. I quickly It seems as though some tracted but not by me. decided that discretion was students were getting rowdy I once saw a person get in order and left. in the lobby. Instead of just hurt at a tennis match. The But one perk of football making them leave, a police person on one end drove a was periodically going to, officer squirted them with hard, two-handed forehand through, or anywhere near pepper spray. And she must shot right at his opponent's Montezuma, home of Yoder's have really laid it on. With feet. The opponent did noth- ing but drop the head of his racket to his feet. The ball struck the racket, bounced offgatut l ll aqa rson on the side of ~h~6~r~wh6 not paying attention. The ball hit him on the side of his head, dropping him to his knees. An ambulance was summoned to the scene. High school sports are fun to cover because high school athletes play with intensity. Over the last two weeks I covered a Callaway football game and a Greenville foot- ball game. Both have excel- lent coaching staffs and very good players. Callaway won their game, 44-0. Greenville won their game, 43-0. And that made me won- der- was I a good luck charm for both, or were they just that good? Consider the evidence. Callaway High remains unbeaten in region play. Greenville High remains unbeaten, period. Unless they suffer a total collapse, both appear headed toward region championships and the play- offs. The,jury's decision is in - they are both that good. It was a pleasure cover- ing both teams and I hope they both capture their region championships. That's my opinion. tm In the Hogansville Herald Compiled by Rob Richardson HONORING THE 12TH GRADERS - The top story in the Oct. 20, 1959 Hogansvi//e Hera/d was about Senior Night. "Seniors will be honored at the annual senior appreciation night festivities at the Hogansville -Mary Persons (Forsyth) football game, Friday night, Oct. 23. Miss Judy Jackson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T.J. Jackson, has been chosen by the team as Miss Green Wave. Jim Norris, captain of the Greenwave Team, will be the escort of Miss Greenwave. CANNED GOODS, NOT CANDY - Another front page story told of a charitable effort by some young folks. 'q-he Girl Scouts of Hogansville will Tnck of Treat again this fall, but as in years past, they will not keep their loot. For several years, it has been the custom of the Hogansville Girl Scouts to collect food during Halloween week and give it to needy families of the community for their Thanksgiving dinner. This year they will follow that custom." THAT TIME OF YEAR - Hogansville kids were probably excited to see a large Economy Auto Store ad for the "count down to Christmas." Offered were a Steve Canyon jet helmet for $2.59, a 26-inch boys bike for $39.95, an electric football game for $5.95 and a Li/'Stinky plush skunk for $2.95.