"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
October 25, 2001     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 14 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 14 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
October 25, 2001
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




4 Opinions & Ideas A 6ris lluhlitalm Millard B. Grimly, Prmddectt THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs so4o PUBLtSHEPJADxTISNG I)mX'n}R JOHN KUF2DAta. ASSOCLTE PUBIJSHEtL/EDITOP. BRY&N GI71 AssocM'r: Eurrqm JAYNE GOI)STON B us I h2,s MANACt2R Phone (706) 846-3188 Fax ,,- k-22(6 R O. f)x 426 Hogansville. Georgia 302:tt How to Handle Anthrax Scare Several area police enforcement agencies have received calls from citizens concerned about Anthrax. While they have stated that citizens should be concerned about the threat of Anthrax, it is also important to under- stand it and know what to look for. If a person does come in contact with Anthrax they should not panic. Anthrax organisms can cause infec- tion in the skin, gastrointesti- nal system, or the lungs. To do so, the organism must be rubbed into abraded skin, swallowed, or inhaled as a fine, aerosolized mist. Disease can be prevented after exposure to the anthrax spores by early treatment with the appropriate antibi- otics. Anthrax is not spread from one person to another. For anthrax to be effec- tive as a covert agent, it must be aerosolized into very small particles. This is difficult to do, and requires a great deal of technic skin and special equipment. If these small par- ticles are inhaled, life-threat- ening Iung infection can occur, but prompt recognition and treatment are very effec- tive against anthrax. The complaints most received by department are suspicious packages. Here are some of the things that one might look for when con- cerned about anthrax First, everyone should remember that receiving a package or letter containing substances is very remote. However, it is important for everyone to be aware of char- acteristics that are common to suspicious packages. Some indicators include, but ave not limited to, the followin. Excessive postage - If a letter has far too much postage, it is considered sus- picious and you may want to look at it carefully for traces of anthrax. , Hand written or poorly typed addresses, letters with no return addresses, etc. should be also considered SUS- piCIOUS. One clear sign a letter might contain anthrax is if it has oily stains, is discolored or has an odor. You should also watch for envelopes with excesive weight, lopsided or uneven envelopes, if you have not placed an order to a compa- ny. If the letter or envelope contains a ticking sound, you should not open it Look for a city or state in the postmark that does not match ,the return address. Here is what you should do ff you receive a suspicious package: Do not shake or empty the contents of any suspicious envelope or package; DO NOT TRY to clean up pow- ders or fluids. Place the envelope or package in a plastic bag or some other type of container to prevent leakage of con: tents. If you do not have a con- tainer, the cover the envelope or package with anything (e.g., clothing, paper, trash can, etc.) and do not remove the cover. Then leave the room and close the door, or section of e home, off to prevent o- ers from entering the area. Be sure to keep everyone away from the area. Wash your hands with soap and water to prevent spreading any powder to you face or skin. If you are at home, then report the incident to local police. If you are at work, then report the incident to local police and notify your build- ing security official or an available supervison If possible, list all the people who were in the room or area when the suspicious letter or package was recog- nized. Give this list to both the local public health depart- ment and law enforcement officials for follow up inves- tigations and advice. Remove clothing with "videnee of the suspicious st4bstance and place in a plas- tirbag that can be sealed; give theag to police. *\\;hower with soap and water, as soon as possible. Do not use bleach or disinfectant on your skin. For more information, contact the Georgia Division of Public Health Event Information Line, operated by the Georgia Poison Center, at 1-866-752 3442 (toll free, 24 hours a day, seven days a week). You may also visit the Georgia Division of Public Health Bioterrorism web- page at THE HOrANSVllJJ HOME NEWS is punished weekly by the Star-Mercur) Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publs, at  1 Rx),x- ell  lighway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Mexiwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all ,"sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 302.30. FOR JBSCRIPIIOI call (706) 846-3188 or write ta} Circulatitm MamJger. Swa" Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816 Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogatville. GA 30230. Publisher and Advertising Directo ............................................................... Mike Hale Asate Publisher and Editor ............................................................ J Kuykendalt B Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ............. ............................................................... .......... Rob Richardsou SWriters ............... = ...................................................... .Bryan Gekr, Bil}y BO'ant Assistant Adv Manager .................................................................. laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .................................................................. . ..................... Linda Lester Cing ...................................................................... nda IvcD, Lauren King s ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldst(m Pressman .......................................................................................... Wa? ne Grocbwski Pressroom .......................................................................... David Bgs, Larry Colleges President ............................................................................................. Millant B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary .......................................................................................... Iaum Grimes Corer Treasurer ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrctt Legal Counsel and Assistant  ............................................... James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANSVIH00 HOME NEWS - OCT. 25, 2001 i Lunch With'Dudley and Danny Moreland, Georgia -- I was having lunch here in my hometown th the folks, and Dudley Stamps and Danny Thompson, both of whom still live in these parts, dropped by. We were boys together here, but we don't see very much of each other anymore. Twenty years ago we were inseparable. Then one day, I went my way and they went theirs. Danny's hair is turning gray. Dudley is losing his. They both have good jobs and families. They seem happy. So we had this idea after lunch, and that was to take a walk together. Grown men rarely take walks together, but the weather was nice and since we were in the midst of reminiscence anyway, it seemed the thing to do to take a walk around the little town from which we sprouted. We walked slowly, and we stopped often. We told some old stories and we had us some laughs. We were walking through what used to be my grand- mother's yard where we played together before we learned our multiplication tables. - "Mama WiUie's yard does- n't seem nearly as big as it did back then, does it?" said Danny. It didn't. What, I won- dered, is the shrinking agent in time? We walked up to the Methodist church. The vacant lot in front of the church was where we played touch football The lot isn't vacant any- more. Somebody poured some concrete on it and put up a fence. We walked down to Cureton and Cole's store, where we met each afternoon after school and drank big orange bellywashers and ate Zagnut candy bars. Cureton and Cole's store is now home to some sort of interior decorator. That hurt. The post office isn't the post office anymore either. It's a beauty salon, and they're trying to refurbish the old hosiery mill next door and make it into a museum. We remembered the Fourth of July street dances they used to hold in front of the old hosiery mill. 'fflaey quit having them," Danny said, "when folks got to drinkin' and fightin'." "They're trying to bring them back, though," said Dudley. "Nowthey smell your breath before they'll sell you a ticket." We walked up what was left of the old path that leads to the schoolhouse. Danny peeked through one of the windows at eh room where we spent our eighth grade year. "Dang if that sight don't pull at my stomach," he said. We had to go to the old ballfield. Dudley was our catcher. Danny played first. I pitched. Even the ballfield wasn't the same. They've put home- plate where right field used to be, and somebody tore down the tree that provided the shade for the home team bench. The walk was over much too quickly. Back home, we talked about the inevitabiliW of change and how they should have left our ballfield the way it was. Then we shook hands and said we ought to do this sort of thing more often, which we won't, of course. But at least we had this day, the day three grown men walked back through their childhood together I wish I had told them how much I loved them before they left. But you know ho grown men fire. BY SPECIAL ARRANGE- MENT AqTH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, THE HOME NEWS IS CARRYING SEqEC'TED COLL ,LNS B Y TIlE LATE LEWIS GRIZZARD, WHO GREW NEARBY MORELAND, AND BECA_IE THE MOST WDEL GEORGIA WRITER OF HIS TIME. GRIZZARD BEINGED TO ALL AMERICA BUT HE PARTICUq_,ARL BELONGED TO THIS AREA OF GEORGIA, OF WHICH HI; 'WROTE SO OFTEN, WHERE A PORTION OF FROM NEWNAN HOGANSVILLE IS NAMED IN HIS HONOR. THE LEWIS GRIZZARD MUSEL.rM WAS ESTABLISHED LN MORElAND IN 1996, AND A WRITING EDITING LAB IS BEING DEDI- CATED TO HIS MEMORY AT HIS BELOVED LNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA.GRIZZARD'S BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL AVAIIf ABLE mR SALE THROUr BAD BOOT PRODUCHONS, p.o. BOX 191266, ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND AT BOOK AND MUSIC STORES NATIONWIDF- Good Advisors, Faith Help Bush rave weeks after the ter- roristic attacks on America, our military moves forward with its plan of action to elim- inate terrorists around the world. Bombing of the Taliban locations in Afghanistan began last week and will likely continue for a while. President George Bush and his close advisors seem to be covering all the bases, and the U.S. citizens like what he is doing. His approval rat- ing for handling the terrible events of September 11 is 92 percent. Bush has surrounded himself with topnotch advi- sors, and that is where his success is, and will continue, to come from. When you have men of intelligence and expe- rience by your side such as Vice-President Dick Chancy, Secretary of State Colin Powell, Attorney General John Ashcroft, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, and a host of top military advi- sors, you have built a winning team. In his news conference last week Bush continued to express confidence that U.S. forces will prevail. "People often ask me how long will this last," the President sai& "This particular battlefront will last as long as it takes to bring al Qaida to justice. It may happen tomorrow, it may happen a month from now, it may take a year or two, but we will prevail." President Bush reminded us that Osama bin Laden and his cohorts were given ample time to give themselves up before the first bomb was dropped or the first missile was fired. He told Taliban again that "we'll reconsider what we're doing in your country, ff you cough up bin Laden. Just bring him in, and bring his leaders and lieu- tenants and other thugs and c "rmainals with him." The United States contin- ues to show the world just what kind of humanitarian country we are with air drops of food, medicine and other supplies in Afghanistan. President Bush has said many times that our war is not with Afghans but with the Taliban terrorist regime. In his press conference last week, Bush announced another humanitarian aid program, this one involving U.S. children. The president asked each American child to contribute $1.00 to help starv- ing, destitute Afghan chil- dren. "This is an opportunity to help others while teaching our own children a valuable lesson about service and character," the President "Bush has sur- rounded himself with topnotch advi- sors, and that is where his success is, and will contin- ue, to come from." said. The program is build- hag momentum around the country. During the past weeks President Bush has left no doubt about his faith in God and the fact that he relies on Him for wisdom and guid- ance. This really makes me feel extra good about our President. Bush held a noontime meeting at the White House prior to his address to Congress on September 20, with ministers from 30 denominations, Evangelist Franklin and Christian author Lucado. Following the Bush met privately for 30 minutes with six sters, discussing the " for Americans together spiritually and the importance of faith. Southern Baptist Convention President JameS Merritt of Snellville was one of the six pastors, and he left the meeting knowing that we have a president who has a genuine love for Christ. "I think I can speak for the entire group when I say that without question, we all came away impressed with where he is right now as a leader and where he is spiri- tually," Merritt said. "He is a man of deep faitl The President is without question a compassionate conservative," Merritt said. "He wanted to share with us his need for prayer and hiS need for wisdom during theSe days." The religious stood in a circle with the pre-s ident, clasped hands, prayed. We are fortunate, at this time especially, to have a President with a deep faith ia God. It's 'Just Over in the Gloryland' In 1906, James W. Acuff and Emmett S. Dean put together the old favorite, "Just Over In The Gloryland." This song has long been the favorite of many Christians because it speaks of their blessed hope, the coming of the Lord Jesus, and their home in heaven. Once Jesus comes and the church is removed, while the seven years tribulation are unfold- ing on the Earth, the saints will be at home in Heaven. The first phrase of each of the four verses of that old song gives a good description about the child of God's hope of Heaven. The phrases say, "I've a home where the saints abide, I am on my way to those man- sions fair, What a joyful tho't my Lord I'll see, With the blood washed throng I will shout and sing." While the Earth is experiencing the wrath of God, those saved by the grace of God will be busy with other things. While Revelation chap- ters four and five describe the scene of the saints in Heaven, there are two other events that we must concern ourselves with. These two events are the Judgement Seat of Christ and the Marriage Supper of the Lamb. Both of these times include only those who have by faith received Jesus as their Savior. Once the church is raptured, (caught away) all will stand before the Judgement Seat of Christ. This judgement is not to determine whether one is saved or lost, but to deter- mine rewards. Contrary to the belief of many, the Bible teaches that one can know now where he will spend eter- nity. (I John 5:13) This judgement is presided over by the Lord Jesus Christ where he will put to test the quality of every work of every believer. If the work withatandsthe test, then a reward will be given, if the work does not survive the test, then a loss will be suf- fered. (I Corinthians 3:12-15 and 2 Corinthians 5:10) While living in this world below, every cd of God must realize that one day an account will be given. Every preacher will account for every sermon preached, every teacher will account for every lesson given, every singer will account for every song sung, and every church member will account for every serv- ice rendered for the cause of Christ. Although God does reward faithful service, there will also be loss for service of the wrong quality. According to the Bible, the rewards will be in the form of crowns for different areas of service. There will be the ruptible crown (I Corinthia 9:25-27), the crown of lifel (James 1:2, Revelation 2:10), the crown of (2 Timothy 4:8), the glory (I Peter 5:24) and crown of rejoicing Thessalonians 2:19-20). some the The crowns will be derful, but even more receiving the crowns the time when the saints cast them at the Revelation 4:10 says, four and twenty elders down before him that sat, the throne, and worship that liveth for ever and and cast their crowns the throne When the comes lay- at Jesus' feet our him, what at those nail scarred feet?