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Manchester, Georgia
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October 26, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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October 26, 2000
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVlLLE HOME NEWS - OCTOBER 26, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS620-040 A Gnme Sublication Millard B. Grimes, President MI] I-IA PUBI JSItER]ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KALL ASSOCIATE PUBI JSDITOR BRYAN GETER ASSOCIA Fa)rroR JAYNE GOWN BUSINESS MANAGER . Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 f Iogansville, Georgia 30230 They're Not Just For Halloween... From home harvest scenes to commercial advertisements, pumpkins have become the stan- dard backdrop from early October to Thanksgiving. They're not just for Halloween anymore. Georgia's commercial pump- kin production is relatively small, but interest in pumpkins extends to almost everyone. From the home gardener to the 4-H Club competition, trying to grow the biggest pumpkin con- tinues to fascinate people. Miniature pumpkins are just as popular. Pm pumpkins are the choice for cooking. And about the last week in October, almost everyone turns his attention to the search for the perfect jack- o'-lantern. PUMPKINS HAVE become the centerpiece of the entertain- ment farming business. Entertainment farming is a term used for farms offering tours, hayrides, carving classes and field trips as part of their sale business. What could be better than a trip to the country in the fall air,. taking a hayride through the the white pumpkin. White on the outside and orange inside, these pumpkins have become increas- ingly popular for painting. The white exterior makes the perfect canvas for the skilled artist. These works of art won't take a place alongside the Mona Lisa in 100 years, though. They will decay over time. While many of our vegetables come from other continents, pumpkins originated in the Americas. Production in south Georgia is a challenge, but not impossible. Recent and upcom- ing advances in pest control and disease-resistant varieties may one day make it much more fea- sible. Pumpkins are usually plant- ed in May and June in north Georgia and June and July in south Georgia. Depending on the vine type, they require 15 to 50 square feet of space per plant. Varieties usually require 75 to 120 days from planting to maturity. Pumpkins fare well with organic fertilizer amendments, since they're not heavy users of nitrogen. To try your hand at growing your own crop, consult your county extension office. frqshnade : : :':; pumpkin pie IF YOU P to buy your d'i61ile the perfect pumpkin? Georgia grows about 500 acres of pumpkins, not counting the backyard bounty. Pumpkins grow quite well in north Georgia. Just don't expect to grow a world record pumpkin anywhere in Georgia. THE LARGEST pumpkins recorded for Georgia are in the 350-400-pound range. The world record stands above 1,000 pounds. The record-setters were grown in either Europe or Canada, where the climate is much milder. Pumpkins grow on vines that require a lot of space. That often limits home gardens. However many newer varieties have restricted vines or bush-type vines and can be grown in small- er areas. This is particularly true for the miniatures. Most miniature pumpkins are actually gourds. The unique shapes and colors and diminutive size make them ideal for decora- tive displays. AN INTERESTING oddity is pumpkins, always look for one with a good strong handle that has no damage. Fully mature pumpkins will most often have a dull sheen and will be of the color typical for that variety. Pumpkins that are damaged or not fully mature when they're picked will have a short shelf life. Even when picked ripe, most pumpkins will store for only one to. four months. Southern-grown pumpkins store less than that Pumpkins can be a great source of entertainment, whether at the entertainment farming venue or in your own back yard. Arrange a table display with miniatures. Carve your own jack- o'-lantern. Make pumpkin pie from an old family recipe. Whether you paint a unique picture on a white pumpkin can- vas or just brag about having the biggest pumpkin at the fair, pumpkins always bring fun to fall. (Terry Kelley is an Extension Service horticultur- ist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) ' His First Golf Course, Near Recall that on the second sud- den death playoff hole of the Masters golf tournament ton April 12, 1987), Larry Mize chipped in a birdie from off the green to win the tournament from Greg Norman, who is the best golfer on the planet. Norman had no recourse but to move on to the next tourna- ment, the Heritage Classic at the Harbour Town Golf Links at Hilton Head, where something else happened to him that was traumatic. He had to play in the Pro-Am with me as one of his partners. Since I have no grandchildren, let me tell you about my golf game. I began playing golf when I was 16 at a lovely course near my native Moreland, Georgia. The course had a number of interesting touches. You teed off next to a barn, you often had to shoot over cows grazing on the course/pasture, and if your ball landed in a sub- stance cows are famous for (besides milk), you got a free drop. I PLAYED GOLF until I was 22, and then I quit due to a lack of talent and took up tennis. I played tennis every day for the next 16 years. About a year ago, however, I awakened one morning and was no longer able to brush my teeth with my right hand because my shoulder was hurting so badly from playing tennis every day for 16 years. So, fool that I am, I started playing golf again. I presently carry a 14 handi- cap, hook the ball miserably, and recently missed a three-inch putt. Back to Greg Norman. What a nice man. He signed about 3,000 auto- graphs and posed for at least that many pictures during our round. As I watched him smile his way through all that, I thought of a young sportswriter trying to interview baseball's Darryl Strawberry of the Mets during spring training. The kids asked Strawberry a simple question. "Out of my face," is how Strawberry answered him. Norman had a bad round in the Pro-Am, he shot 5 over pro= I lost control of my game and birdied the fifth hole. On number six, I chipped in from off the green for another birdie. "I've seen that shot before," said Norman, referring to Mize's winning chip against him in August. "And it was going the same speed," he added, referring to the fact that both Mize's shot and my shot would still be rolling had they "If your ball landed in a substance cows are famous for (besides milk), you got a free drop." not gone into the hole. PLAYING GOLF with Greg Norman and making back-to- back birdies is one of the high- lights of my life. And who would have thotght such a thing would happen tole years ago back home when a cow once mooed during my backswing and I hit my shot into the pigpen, The views expressed on the Opinion Page of the Hogansville Home News are the expressions and ideas of each writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the management. THE HO6ANSVnJ HOME, NEWS is published weekly by the S 'tar-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties: $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all les taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230. FoR SUaSCRI1ONS call(706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications. E O. Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAI Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Pubhsher and Editor ................................................................ Jam Kuykendall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter AssisVant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Business Manager .....................................  ................................................. Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ....................................................................... Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ....................................................................... .Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .................................................................................................  Camp Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Composing ..................................................... Valinla Ivery, Deborah Smith, Laurcn King Legals ............................................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Clefs Young Production,Manager. ............................................................................................. Todd Laird Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Omchowski COIOITE OWIOZRS President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S, Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Gan Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. Grimes z where a large hog my ball. BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE HOME CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LEWIS GRIZZARD UP IN NEARBY AND BECAME THE WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS GRIZZARD ALL AMERICA BUT TICULARLY THIS AREA OF WHICH HE WROTE SO ( AND WHERE A 85 FROM HOGANSVILLE IS HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD ESTABLISHED IN IN 1996, EDITING LAB IS ICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED UI OF GEORGIA.G BOOKS AND TAPES AVAILABLE FOR THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. 191266, ATLANTA, GA  1266ANDATB STORES NATIONWIDE. The Notable Picnics at Dowdell's President Roosevelt intro- duced one new dining style to Georgia. That was the elaborate picnic In Georgia before he came, a picnic was always the simplest sort of endeavor. Ham sandwiches, beer or soft drinks or a pitcher of tea, or lemonade, maybe cold fried d'dgken, ic- hie blankeadfVde--hnd chairs. ................ Roosevelt preferred regular dinner dishes, tables with linen, chairs or, as often as not, the back seats of his cars removed and placed on the ground. He thought picnics should be catered, that there should be ser- vants. In addition to beer or Coke from a bottle, he had glasses and the ingredients for cocktails and a cocktail shaker along. THERE WERE several spots in the area that he preferred -- 'die wolf's den," a spot by a water- fall on or near his farm, reached from the Columbus Highway; "sunshine shack," a lean-to in an open field on the road from Warm Springs to Pine Mountain; the ninth hole at the golf course offered a picnic site; and there was Dowdell's Knob, which got a bona fide state built spur built to it in 1937 to replace Roosevelt's own earlier effort. It thus became more suitable for large groups. (At Roosevelt's suggestion, the Georgia Highway Department built a loop at the end of the road. The President said he found the deadend at the point where the mountain sloped down to the val- ..ley dangerous.) THE 1943 PICNIC was at the Knob. It was a typicalRooseveltian elegance catered by the B&O Railroad, with one wartime- inspired difference. ' Soldiers from Fort Benning, in battle dress, with loaded rifles and sidearms, stood along the mile- long spur, prowled the woods along either side, and guarded the cele- brants from the perimeter of the cleared area at the loop. "Roosevelt pre- ferred regular dinner dishes, tables with linen, chairs or, as often as not, the back seats of his cars removed and placed on the ground." The people of Meriwether County understood the reasoning behind such precautions. was a permanent Marine ment near the Little but most them unnecessary. If there was one Roosevelt was most safe, was one plae where least likely to befall they were sure, Springs. (Next week: The, last 'THE SQUIRE OF OF WARM SPRINGS TLE WHITE HOUSE. REPRINTED IN THIS PER DURING THE PAST PROCEEDS SALE ALL GO TO SEVELT REHAB CENTER. Finishing Well Is What Counts The American poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, said, "Great is the art of beginning, but greater is the art of ending." Many years before, King Solomon had something similar to say. He said in Ecclesiastes 7:8, "Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof: and the patient in spirit is l?etter than the proud in spirit." When I was play- ing sports in high school, it was every player's goal to "start" the game. As time went on, I found that it wasn't necessarily the best who started, but it was the ones who finished who counted. WE FIND that many people start things, but a large percent- age never finish. As we study of Bible, one cer- tain individual comes to mind that bears the same characteris- tics. Most know him as the strongest man in the Bible, Samson. Samson was a young boy that had all the opportunities and privileges needed to end up being used greatly of od. Samson gives us the story of one who had all the right begin- nings, but finished in the wrong way. Someone once said, "Privileges are no guarantee of success and good beginnings do not guarantee good endings." How could it be that a young man with all the right tools to live right, die in such a wrong way? In a close examination of Samson's life, several things could be named, but allow me to call your attention to three of them. The first things that led to Samson's downfall was that he had a desire that was controlled by the things of this world. Samson had a wandering eye for women with whom he should not have anything to do. As an Israelite, he was instructed not to marry outside the faith of the Jews, but he was so controlled by his desire for worldly things, he began his down fall. We must understand, the things of this world will not satisfy the needs of the heart. Secondly, Samson was cal- loused by his disrespect for his parents. In Judges 14, we find Samson demanding his father to get the woman from Tinmath for his wife. Samson had become so engrossed In this world, it had now turned his heart from his very on parents. IF a young person wants tO finish in a wrong way, just let him dishonor and disobey his parents. As my wife and I spend time with our oldest son at the football field, I am appalled at the way some of the children treat their parents. It is a shame the disrespect that some children show their moms and dads. As hard as we may be on the chil- dren for their disrespect and dis- obedience, they are not all the blame. Some parents must bear the responsibility for the attitudes of their children. I feel a lot of the problem stems from the fact ents wait too late to ing their obey their authority. not call of ( problem many a today. That is they are their devotion for Samson had a special God, he had made to the Lord, but he in keeping them. Before long, he every one of his Nazarite It is great to begin, even greater to finish. all be able to say like fie Paul, "I have course ..... " we/comeyour/etters. Please mail them to: The Hogansville Home News P. O. Box 426 Hogansvil, Georgia 30230 Please fix them to: 7O6-846-2206 Please be rare to include an address and phone number