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Manchester, Georgia
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October 28, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
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October 28, 1999
 

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OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - OCTOBER 27, 1999 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 62o-o4o Mn Be Proud of Lottery Defeat, Alabama Jk (rimB lublication Millard B. Grimes, President PUBLISHER]ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHF, R]EDITOR MARION (TEa) SMrrH MANAGING EDITORfrECttNICAL DmECOR WmBERT BUSINESS MANAG Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Ocial Legal Orgtat Ci O, qf Hogcmville Salt Lost its Savor Every now and again, my 1979 Nova needs a little atten- tion, so I will take it to "Hubbard and Spinks." Sammy Hubbard will add a lit- tle air to the tire,s check the radiator fluid, put on a new safety sticker, and call me that all is well. It then runs good for the next several months, and we are both happy. When I need a little atten- tion, the wife says, "We will put you in the hospital. I reply, "Oh, no, I'll just go to 'Hubbard and Spinks,' maybe my air is low." This brings a reaction from the wife: "If you don't go to the hospital, I'll cry!" Now, I can't stand to see a grown wife cry, so she calls our good friend, Dr. Raymond Leverett, and we put together a little "stuff" and off we go. Our good friend, the doc- tor, after consulting with my wife, agrees my air is indeed, low, but he doesn't think Sammy could help me, so it's off to the W.G.M.C. we go. "Room will be ready," smiles the doctor. "Have fun." When you open the hospi- tal door, you lose your name, and all you stand for, and become insurance and social security numbers. The room, Allan Dee Dodson ,, The people of Alabama can : be very proud of themselves for defeating a state lottery recent- ly. Unfortunately Georgia vot- ers approved a lotteryby a small margin a few years ago. Our for- mer esteemed Governor Zell Miller led the movement for the Georgia lottery, as did Governor Don Siegelman in Alabama. Let me tell you why the peo- ple in Alabama who worked hard, and voted against the state lottery, can be proud. First off, you voted not to place the burden of further edu- cational opportunities directly on the shoulders of those who can least afford the additional "taxes." It is not a secret that the vast majority of those who PlaY the lottery are ,folks who can least afford it. If you doubt this, just drive across the border into Georgia or Florida and take a look at Sez i i those standing in a lottery line. Secondly, you avoided for now the possibility of con- just plain 254018430." As you enter the l:oom, they give you a milk bucket and a razor blade. You are supposed to fill the bucket with blood. Actually, I'm only kidding, but it would sure save a lot of time later on. Your first shock comes when your breakfast is served. You can see it, and feel it, but you can't taste it. You note it is called a "2 gram low sodi- um diet," which, being inter- preted means there is no salt in this food, and it's not fit to eat. Seriously, have you ever tasted-unsalted grits? To eat unsalted grits would compare favorably, I think, to a double amputation, or perhaps, child- birth. You show me a man who likes unsalted grits, and I'll show you the missing link. Seriously, I think the next tributing towards making it very easy for thousands of peo- ple to become habitual gam- blers. With the great job done by the Alabama Christian Coalition, pastors, churches and others from all across the state, you have no doubt seen the habitual gambling figures so there is no need for me to report them here. Next, you have decided not to tarnish the name of the great state of Alabama with a nega- tive gambling image. Some of you probably live close enough to our state or Florida that you have to sit through television commercials promoting how great the lottery is. When this happens at our house, or the drawings appear on TV, we leave the room for necessary reasons, or flip the channel. But, I'm here to tell you, the above brings about con- stant channel flipping. By voting down the lottery, you have set a wonderful Christian example fof'those in your state and nation, as well as your young people. Yes, every- one knows you have four dog racing tracks, but you can rest assured those tracks are not a drop in the bucket as to how they affect people negatively com- pared to a state lottery. With a state lottery, it's almost like hay- Bob Tribble Former Publisher ing a dog track in every town and community. There is no question that our lottery provides Hope Scholarships for college tuition, a prekindergarten program and computers for some class- rooms. But, the real question is, is it worth all the bad that comes from a state lottery in order to get the good? I think not. When Georgia voted on the lottery a few years back, we did all we could do to defeat it, but it still passed by a narrow mar- gin. We don't regret that effort, arid should the issue come to a vote again, we would do the same again.There just has to be a better way to fund education than to do it with gambling dol- lars. Speaking of lottery to the best of my ing about S0 percent of amount spent for tickets into the education fund. The other 50 on high salaries for cials, other expenses, ing and prize money. Most everyone in as in Georgia, wants a educational in national standings. Lottery dollars in Geor are focused more on tuition than on cation where the real need Let's first with good reading, and arithmetic skills. Finally one of the across the board taxes is sales tax, provided food medicine are excluded. Maybe a one statewide sales tax to ter education would get approval of voters. Yes, Alabama can be of the fact they defeated state lottery. We are certainly yOU. Roosevelt Becomes a Cattle Farmer (Another in a series) After an incident at the Southeastern World's Fair, Franklin Roosevelt's cattle operation was even more cel- ebrated. The fair, held in Atlanta every fall, was a typical "state fair" event, with amusements, rides, sideshows and agricul- tural exhibits. Tap Bennett either misled or was misquoted by a reporter for the Atlanta Constitution. Bennett was superintend- of course, is not ready,, so you time my air is low, I will go to ent of the stock department of wait. "It will just be a minute," Sammy He may not know the fair for 1933. Th storl smileaJ:l 4rl'than I qag.  mla o,  eaghaet , m]xec[- admit you:" My air, being very  hV$'yetid* to $'reme *up leli foYl effect low, I gasp. "Can't I just go and unsalted grits, that "Roosevelt cattle" would be on display at the fair. Bennett told the fair's director, Mike Benton, a flam- boyant showman, that he couldn't do that. All the President had in the way of cattle were halfbreeds raised on his farm, which weren't appropriate for the fair, plus their calves, plus registered sires bought else- where--which weren't techni- cally "Roosevelt cattle." After a heated discussion about what was beginning to look like an embarrassment, Bennett got permission from Benton to order some top- grade ready-for-market steers from Chicago. While they were en route to Atlanta, Bennett went to Warm Springs and got some of Roosevelt's halfbreeds, a I would recommend to all men two things: first, if you have to go to a hospital, be sure you have a wife. If you don't have one, try your best to pick one up on the way. Second, be sure to fill your pockets with salt before leaving home. Actually, the! people at W.G.M.C. are very kind and helpful, and I recommend them 100%, if you have to go. They even give you back your name when, and if, you leave. Hope to see you next week, and please eat a bowl of salt- ed grits for me. This column was written by the late Allan Dee Dodson, former columnist for The Hogansville Herald from 1981-1986. sit in the room? .... Oh, no," she says. "You have to be admit- ted first." I suppose if, while waiting, I gave completely out of air and crossed the Jordan, some- one would call "Claude McKibben." He would come hurriedly, looking sad and solemn, hat and all, but he would have to wait until I was admitted. So,we would wait together. I wouldn't object much more, until he could take me from my room to do what comes next. This fortunately, does not happen this time, and finally the girl says, "Your room is ready, Mr. 254018430." I smile in pride. "You see, dear Wife, they still call me Mister, not Hereford sire, plus several calves. He set up a red-white-and- blue bunting-decorated exhib- it in which the sire was in one pen, then the halfbreeds, then the three-quarter-breed calves, then the handsome beef cows from Chicago. According to a news story after the fair opened, the exhibit was the hit of the show. "New Deal Calves from Roosevelt Farms at Warm Springs Show Way to Farmer," the headline writer for the Constitution wrote over a stoy andpicture, of  of the white-faced three.quarter breeds. ....... Bennett gave up his other duties to stay with the exhib- it. His spiel to the thousands who flocked to the exhibit was quoted thusly in the newspa- per: "These folks are looking at a plan--a demonstration of action. They are being convinced visually that President Roosevelt is a man of action. Other Georgia farmers have talked of plans for stabilizing the livestock industry in the state, but this farmer, President Roosevelt, put that p]an into a fact and the result is here." There was a sign over the pens: "The practical and eco- nomical method of establish- ing a beef cattle industry is to start with native cows and one registered bull. Improve the The Squire of Warm Springs By Theo Un pastures and grazing. Grow more feed." Bennett would tell crowds that the arrangement told a story. "With these [pointing to Herefordg]- :theapoint - ;ing to halfbreeds], we get 'these little critters, that develop into those that you see in that pen [pointing to the stockyard's prize animals]. That last pen of beef cat- tle ready for market repre- sents the objective of every Georgia stock grower..." Bennett probably never said the cattle in the last pen were actually bred on Roosevelt's farm. But he probably never said they weren't, either. The exhibit remained pop- ular throughout the fair's sea- son of ten days or so. So pop- ular was it, in fact, that Bennett found himself on duty from 7 a.m. to 1:30 a.m. every day, answering questions and giving his speech. The Constitution's final publicity bonus was an inter- view with a farmer from Pike County, Georgia, who said he had decided on the spot to buy a Hereford bull. "There be a few less acres of more alfalfa and r and one more re Hereford bull in Pike at this time next year," paper said. President apparently did not hear story until the next when he came to Springs for Thanksgiving. sat listening to Bennett in all its detail. When the story was he looked at Bennett for moment, then throwing his head back like his neck was on bin in Bennett's phrase. "It went all the way back." The "Roosevelt exhibit produced a bonus. attendance to the exhibit far exceeded tions. Moreover $35, invested in Coca-Cola and, according to Bennett growth in value of that over the next few years the fair afloat. That same October, U.S. Department Agriculture Roosevelt (No. 18,126) a breeder of registered "Purebred Sires Used on This Farm," a there proclaimed But behind the sign, the it situation was not as rosy it had been at the fair. (Next week: De Hits FDR Farm.) THE HOGANSVII.LE HOME NEWS is published wccldy by the Star-Mercury Publisifing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subscription rates by mail: $15 in Meriwether, Talbm or Hams Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes, Second class postage paid at Hogansvine, Georgia 30230. FOR suascmPTmss call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director ..................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................. John KuykendaU Managing Editor and Technical Director ........................................... Marion (Ted) Smith Business Manager ....................................................................................... I.,eeAnn Wilben Associate Editors .......................... Billy BryanCTalbotton, Michael Snider/Hams County Bryan Geter/Hogansville0 Caroline Yeager/Greenville, Lee N. Howell Staff Writer .......................................................................................................... J. Dan Stout Assistant Advertising Manager ....................................................................... Jurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Photography ................................................................................................... Michael Snider Composing ................................................................................... Valinda lvery. Don Gtn Legals ................................................................................................................ Valinda ivery Receptmnist and Classifieds ............. : ............................... . ................................ Cleta Young Pressroom ....................................................................... David Boggs, Wayne Grochowski CORFORATE OFFICERS President ......................................................................................................... Millard Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. Grimes Help! My Computers are Down... The world is computer driv- en now. Everything we pur- chase everything we eat and especially everything we read has been toucld a computer in some Way. If rbu rely on com- puters as heavily as we do at the newspaper, it begomes a seri- ous problem when things are not working right. That was the case at our office last week. My normal week became a battle just trying to meet press deadlines and get the newspa- pers together on time. The papers were large ones and we bad two other special issues to produce. Things got even worse when my comput- er decided it didn't want to open files, save or even print with- out crashing. Finally, the thing decided it wanted to crash each and every time I used the scroll tool. If you know anything about comput- ers you can imagine how hard it would be to produce anything when you can't open a file, save a file or use a scroll tool. I spent hours upon hours get- ting the papers out, and the Talbotton paper didn't make it until Friday. I need to apologize to our readers in Talbot County for that. You see, we changed our press run on the "IIbotton New Era from Wednesday to Thursday last week for the first time. Our readers in Talbotton have always received their newspaper on Friday. Due to the computer problems, the paper was even later. I really do apol- ogize for any inconvenience this may have caused our readers in Talbot County. Where was I? Oh yeah. My computer was acting really weird and I tried everything I could to get the blasted thing back up and running. It just did- n't want to cooperate and my week became a nightmare. I did- n't see home but about two hours each night. Long enough to eat, shower, grab an hour or two sleep and return to work. I called support day after day, but they couldn't get to me until Friday. That was well after all of the papers had to be fin- ished and on the streets. So, the battle between the computer and I continued throughout the week. On Friday, my computer support guys arrived at 9 a.m. They worked throughout the day trying to get our system back up and running. Finally, around 11 p.m. Friday night, the system was back on line. They John Kuykendal! little dignity I had by telling me there was no way I could have gotten the system back up and running without their help. It seems we bad a virus in our sys- tem that was spreading. Some how, we got it off the Internet. I was relieved, but really behind at work. So, I used Saturday as a day of catch-up. I arrived at work around 9 a.m. Saturday morning and finally left around 8 p.m. Some way, some how though, I'm back on track and am now ready to begin producing newspapers again this week. After the week I've experi- enced, it made me think about Y2K. While I personally don't believe the world is coming to an end, banks will be closing their doors, or any of the other millions of things everyone is worried about. I realized how- ever, it could be a trying for companies who have not pared for Y2K. Then, I started to think howmuch everyday lives and we stop to think about it. It's a fie scary when you think it for very long. Just think, a computer control over every penny have, they determine if eries will be made to stores and other retail and even determine the of chemical that goes into drinking water. Yes, computers are used almost everything today and a bit frightening when sider what puters did go down at on Jan. I, 2000. Then the thought hit what if computers could on their own and decided to us back for all the caused them in the past? what a scary thought! Speaking of scary... Halloween everyone. play it safe out or treating. And just to be the safe side, you may turn your computer off at night on Halloween night. all.., you never know.