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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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November 1, 2001     The Hogansville Herald
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November 1, 2001
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62004O Millafd B. Grimes, President MInE Hnaz PU BLLq[ IIhtcJADx.;RTD;1NG Dw.Ecnm JOHN KLqKENDALL ASSOCIATE Pu BI aSHE/EI)ITOR BRY&N GETER A,,kS X'IATE EDITOR B USl N F2";, IIANAGER Pi)ne (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 1 (). Box 426 }togansville. Georgia .'R}Z) Safety Tips for Shopping Onli__ne Shopping on line has become a pretty common thing. According to the U.S, Department of Commerce, consumers spent about $26 billion shopping on line last year. With that kind of money being spent online, you might think that people are com- fortable with doing so. That is not true. A recent survey commis- sioner by the National Consumers League (NCL) shows that many people are St uneasy when ti comes to making any type purchases online. "Consumers like the con- venience of shopping on the Internet and using their cred- it cards," said Susan Grant, director of the NCEs Internet Fraud Watch, '13ut want to be assured that it's a safe thing to do." If any of our readers want to shop on line, but are a lit- tle afraid to do so, here are Six tips that will make it a safer for you to do so. GET THE SCOOP ON THE SELLER: You should always check to see if com- plaint records have been filed at the state or local consumer protection agency or Better Business Bureau against the ompany or person you are :making the purchase from. Nou will also want to get the hysical address and phone number of the seller so you will have a way to contact the company offline. This way, if ia problem does arise, you can ntact them personally. You will always want to ook for sellers that belong to programs that encourage !good business practices and help resolve complaints. That .goes for shopping online or ilocally. :: USE A CREDIT CARD: While many consumers are i afraid to use their credit cards ionline, it is really the safest : way to make purchases. When i you use a credit card it pro- vides you with a method to i dispute charges for goods or services that were never !ordered, never received or misrepresented. However, it :is important to be sure you have used step one, checked i out the business, before you make a PUrchase with our i charge Pard. You want to !make sure you only give your ; charge card number to a rep- i. utable company. ; ASK YOUR CREDIT CARD ISSUER ABOUT "SUBSTITUTE" OR "SINGE USE" CREDIT CARD NUM- BERS: 2echnology is a won- derful thing and today this new technology allows a con- sumer to use a credit card without putting a real account number online. This protects you from having your num- ber stolen by "hacker" or dis- honest employees of the com- pany. To find out if your cred- it card company provides this service, use the 1-800 num- ber. LOOK FOR CLUES ABOUT SECURITY: When you provide payment infor- mation toany company. When you do, the "http" at the begin- ning of the address bar should automatically change to "https" or "shttp." Your browser should indicate in some way whether the infor- marion you are providing for purchases is being encrypt- ed or scrambled as it is being sent. Always be sure to check Web sites and see what they say about safeguards for your information during the trans- mission and storage of your information. A word of caution: "Never provide sensitive information via E-mail. BE SURE YOU KNOW THE REAL DEAL: Be sure you get all the details on the product and company before you make a purchase online. This means using our first tip and then gathering as much information as possible about the product. This means : a complete description of the Reins purchased, the total pice you are going to pay (in)uding shipping), when yougan expect the item to &'TiV all warranty informa- tion, the company's return policy, and what to do and how should you have any prob- lems. KEEP PROOF HANDY: Be sure tO print and file all information about the pur- chase in case you need it for proof later. For more information about making purchases online, visit the Web site at www.nclnet.org/shoppin- gonline. THE HANSVILLE HOMZ NEWS is publi:ed weekly by the Star-Mercury Pnbtishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Rvelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040, Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elmwhere. Prices include all ,les taxes, Periodical ),ste paid at HogansviUe, ia 30230. FoR sUtwor call (706) 846-3188 or Tite to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426 Manclx-ster, Georgia 31816. PC'TM:R: Send s changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 330. STAr"V Publi,er and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ............................................................ John Kuykendall Business Manager ......................... : ...................................................... Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff'Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Marmger .................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ............................................................... : ....................... .Linda Lester Coming ........................................................................ Valinda h,ery; l.ata King Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldstop. Pressman .......................................................................................... Wayne C,clJ-w  Presmrn .......................................................................... David Boggs, larry Colleges CTE OacEns ident .......... : ................................................................................. .Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary. ......................................................................................... Laura Gri Cofer Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grins Garrett. Legal Counsel and Aistt retary .............................................. Jan S. PAGE 4 - HOGANSVII2- HOME NEWSOV. I, 2001 Working in the Flower Garden MORELAND, GA. -- I always hated flowers when I was a kid. My mother, my grandmother and my Aunt Jessie loved flowers, but is was me they always wanted to go out and work in the dang things. I was a perfectly well- adjusted lad of 10, and I want- ed to do perfectly well-adjust- ed things that lads of 10 want to do, such as play ball and make life miserable for my girl cousin. But, no. Either my moth- er or my grandmother or my Aunt Jessie would latch onto my ear at least once a day and send my out to hoe around in their flower garden. "But real men don't work in flowers," I would protest. "Get out there in those flowers or we'll serve you quiche for supper again," they would volley back. (Actually, nobody in Moreland had ever heard of quiche back then-- and prob- ably few now -- but it made a nice line, so I used it any- way. It's called journalistic license.) I SOON moved from dis- liking flowers to hating them. I would go through the seed catalogs and draw moustach- es on pictures of petunias. My friends gave me a lot of grief about all the time I had to spend working in flow- ers, too. "Wanna play ball?" One would ask. "Him, play ball?" anoth- er would scoff. "He's got to work in his mommy's flow- ers." I tried everything to escape those botanical gar- dens of hell. I even tried to bribe my girl cousin into doing the work for me. I offered her my best marble, Johnny Podres baseball card and not to throw rocks at her anymore if she would do my flower work for me. "Why don't you sit on a cactus, begonia breath," she countered. I REMEMBER telling my Aunt Jessie, who had by far the greenest thumb in the family, how much I hated flowers. "When I grow up," I said, "I'll never look at a flower again." She said I might change my mind one day. I figured she'd been sniffing too many honeysuckle blossoms. I visited home the other day to see the folks. My grandmother is gone now. My mother is too ill to dabble with her flowers anymore. Aunt Jessie, who has seen a lot of springs, is still out among her gardens every day, however. First thing I noticed when I drove up was my aunt's yard. Her azaleas were spectacu- lar, her dogwoods, both pink and white were in full bloom and everywhere there was breathtaking blanketgof blue and pink thrift. My mother said people have been driving by from all over the county to witness the blossoming splendor of my Aunt Jessie's yard. I consid- ered swallowing my pride and visiting my aunt next door to tell her how beautiful her yard was and how wrong I had been about flowers. I didn though. My old hoe is sriH out in the garage some- where, and one word out of me and my Aunt Jessie would have me back at work faster than a weedeater can take the fur off a cat's taft. Flowers or no flowers, if it was ba-d work I had want- ed I wouldn't have gotten this license to practice journal- ism in the first place. BY SPECIAL ARRANGE- MENI " WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, THE HOME NEWS IS CARRYING SD COLUMNS BY THE LATE LEWIS GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN NEARBY MORELAND, AND BECAME THE MOST WIDELY READ GEORGIA WRITER OF HIS TIME. GRIZZARD BELONGED TO ALL AMERICA BUT HE PARTICY BELONGED TO THIS AREA OF GEORGIA, OF WHICH HE WROTE SO OFTEN, AND WHERE A PORTION OF 1-85 FROM NEWNAN TO HOGANSVILLE IS NAMED IN HIS HONOR. THE LEWIS GRIZZARD MUSEUM WAS E.STABLISHE IN MOREIAND IN 1996, AND A WRITING AND EDITING LAB IS BEING DEDI- CATED TO HIS MEMORY ATHIS BELOVED UNIVERSITY OF GEORGDLGRIZZARD'S BOOKS AND TAPE,S ARE STILL AVAIIt ABI FOR SALE THROUGH BAD BOOT PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX 191266, ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND AT BOOK AND MUSIC STORE.S NATIONWID Vision, Determination, Strong Will Scripture tells us that if we don have a vision we will surely perish. Let me share with you a couple of exam- ples today about visionary people who were filled with determination and never gave up until the job was fin- ished and the task accom- plished. Way back in 1863, a cre- ative engineer named John Roebling had an idea for a spectacular bridge that could connect Manhattan Island to Brooklyn. Engineers told him it could not be done, but Roebling convinced his son, Washington, an up-and-com- ing engineer himself, that the bridge was possible. The two men hired a crew and began to build it. The project had been underway only for a few months when a tragic acci- dent took the life of John Roebling and left his son with such massive injuries to his brain that he could neither walk nor talk Everyone thought the project would be scrapped, but Washington's mind was still as active as before. Using the single finger that he could move, Roehling tapped his instructions to his wife in code. He spent the next thirteen years tapping out directions in this manner, and, in the end, his engineers completed the work necessary to erect the Brooklyn Bridge. What a marvelous story! Vision, determination and a strong will to see the task accomplished. Another story is told of a young lady who was once in love with a car salesman. "I was once in love with a car salesman before I met your father," the mother confided to her son. "Why didn't you marry the salesman?" the son asked. "Well," she replied, "every time we went out on a date, he would always stop the car along the way to talk to store owners. He was for- ever jumping out of the car and running into small stores to see the merchants inside." "What is wrong with that?" asked her son. "I thought selling was an awfully unstable profession, and although I loved this young man, I just couldn't see any future in it. So I stopped dating him," the mother replied. "If you simply don't give up you will outlast the peo- ple who come in on the bus with you." "What happened to him?" the son asked. "His name was Thomas J. Watson and he later founded hm own firm, which he called International Business Machines," the mother answered. Another story about vision (which he should have shared with his young date), determination and a strong will to see the task accom- plished. Henry Ford was without a doubt a man with a big vision. Ford once said, "I real- ized early on that success was tied to not giving up. Most people in this busine'ave up and went on to-other things. If you simply don't give up you will outlast the people who come in on the bus with you." Helen Keller said, "Be of good cheer. Do not think of today's failures, but of the success that may come tomorrow. You have set your- selves a difficult task, but yoU will succeed if you persevere; and you will find joy in over- coming obstacles." Right now our nation, along with many other nations, is involved in a war against terrorism that we must, and will, win. Our vision is before us, we are deter- mined, our will is strong, and we will see the task accom- plished. What can I do, you might ask. Continue to pray daily for our military men and women, our world leaderS, and pray especially hard for our president and his close advisors. Avoiding Neglect a Crucial Duty John E Kennedy said, "We will neglect our cities to our peril, for in neglecting them, we neglect the nation." As we listen to our news channels, read our newspa- pers and listen to the ever popular talk radio stations and programs, we are inun- dated with reports of terrible things that happen. We read of those who commit heinous crimes, hear of the latest anthrax cases and wonder who and how people could do such things. It seems most of our news listening time is taken up with those who have done something wrong. However, every now and again, we hear of a case where animals and infinitely more important, children are neg- lected. Many times we are so spellbound by the things that are done wrong, we forget about the right things that are left undone. I am referring to neglect. Not doing the right things is just as wrong, or should I say sinful, as doing the wrong things. The Bible tells us in James 4:17, "Therefore to him that knoweth to do good, and doeth it not, to him it is Sin." This verse can apply to every area of life, but I want to make an application to Christians and their relation- ship to their church. Many of us sat in church yesterday morning and felt pretty good about ourselves, We paid our bills, we did not abuse our children, we did not get drunk, we put a twen- ty dollar bill in the offering plate and we even brought our Bible to church. All of those things can be good, but let's ask ourselves what did we leave undone this past week? I am not referring to things such as not getting all the leaves raked, or not finishing the housework, or not getting the off changed in the car, but what about things such as reading and studying our Bibles, praying, or telling someone else about Jesus? We we are busy doing good things, we are neglecting the best things. The Bible says in Luke 10:40, "But Martha was cum- bered about much serving..." Marthm was doing wonderful things. Jesus bad entered her house and she was busy mak- hag sure everything was just right, all the while her sister Mary just sat at Jesus' feet. Getting upset she was getting no help from Mary, Martha appealed to Jesus. Jesus' answer describes our socie- ty perfectly. He said in Luke 10:41, "And Jesus answered and said unto her, Martha, Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many things: but one thing is needful." Martha was so busy doing the good things, that she did not take time to spend with Jesus. Christian friend, today are you cumbered about with many good things? Dr. Adrian Rogers said something to the effect, the good things become the worst things when they keep us from the best things. If we find that we are too busy with PTO, recreation sports, club after club, activ" ity after activity at church, and a host of other "good  things, then we must realize we are too busy. I realize as much as the next person the demands th#j are placed upon families a individuals in these days.. However, we must reap ize what is important and Jesus said, what is needft_ Again, John E Kennedy said, "We neglect our cities to oOr peril..." May I submit to yO today that we neglect our souls to our peril. I know folks hear all kin of things from all kinds preachers about what they need to do and what they do not need to do, and franidY, preachers do as much complicate lives as the ne person. Today I want to leave Y , with a verse that will simP r fy your life, enable you avoid neglect and to help " keep the main thing the ms, thing. Solomon said Ecclesiastes 12:13, ,,Let 1 hear the conclusion of fl whole matter: Fear God, keep his commandmentS: , this is the whole duty of ms