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Manchester, Georgia
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November 2, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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November 2, 2000
 

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C,pinions & Ideas PAGE 4A - HOGANSVlLLE HOME NEWS - NOVEMBER 312000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 MIIlard B. Gdmoek Prdckmt ME HALE PUB LIS HEaR]AD VERT [SING DIREOR JOHN KUYKENDAI.L A')C [A'I PUBLISHER]EDITOR BRYAN GETER ASSOCLrE EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON Busnzss MANAGF Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 R O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 I Was Fit to Be Tied at the Plaza... I was staying at the Plaza Hotel in New York recently (my publish- er was paying for the room, that's why I wasn't at a Motel 6 in N e wark ), and I went to have lunch in one of the hotel's spfffy restaurants. For the occasion, I wore a blue blazer, accentuated by a pair of khaki trousers and a white golf shirt I'd worn only once before. I knew I was in trouble the moment I saw the maitre d'. He was a tall wisp of a fellow who was prob- Good Officiating Vital for High School Football It takes hard work, dedication and desire to excel in sports. It takes that same commitment to be a Georgia High School certi- fied official. Or at least to be a good one. As a former GHSA certified official, I know how tough it is to be an official and just how thank- less the job can be. However, when someone puts on that uni- form and steps onto the field, they should always strive to do what is right and the best job they pos- sibly can. side of the field. However, Crim was given the touchdown. Did it change the game? No one will ever know. If they had fumbled on the next play or been held to three points, yes it could have changed the game. ONE OF THE OFFICIALS on the sidelines told the official that made the touchdown call he had made the wrong one. The discus- sion went something like this. "He didn't break the plain," the official said. "Oh well, they would have gotten in on the next play anyway," the line judge replied. "Let's just get this thing over with." Two problems here. One he assumed Crim would score. Two, if he wanted to be off the field so bad, he shouldn't have been there in the first place. How can any official speak of ending the game when you're still in the first quarter? Manchester complained to the officials the entire game about Crim's illegal substitutions. Only twice was Crim flagged, although it was a consistent event. While Crim was penalized for 100 yards, only two penalties in the game hurt the Eagles and that was when the game was over. Crirn was hit for two pass interference calls, but they came when the game had been decided and the clock was running out, Unfortunately, the officials didn't know where the ball was to be spotted, so again help was sought from the Crim bench. MANCHESTER PLAYERS complained to officials the entire night about late hits, holding and illegal use of hands. Not one flag, even though most of the com- plaints were legitimate and could be seen by the officials., William Hunt was ejected from the game and will have to miss Friday's game because an official accused him of kicking a player in the pile after he' was taekied. The Blue Devils were penalized 15 yards and the penalty halted a scoring drive. On the very next play, a Crim player was standing up and kicked a Manchester player not once, but three times. While it was visible to everyone, a flag was not thrown and the player was not even cautioned. While I'm always the first to defend officials, because I've been there and I know what it's like, there are some people that just do not belong on the field. The crew calling Friday night did not belong on the field. I'll take that back, one of them did. The head official appeared to know the rules and he was always in position. So, I want to be fair to him because he did his job and he did it well. I think the time has come for the Georgia High School Association to get more involved in the officiating of games. While they contract with certain asso- ciations, there is really no check and balance by GHSA to be sure umpires and officials really know the rules and are good at what they do. Yes, a test is given. However, it is usually given in a clinic and some associations even give the answers to participants. I know this to be true because I have per- sonally witnessed it. AS AN FORMER GHSA offi- cial, I say it is time that credibil- ity is restored to the honorable profession. The only way this can be done is for GHSA to adminis- ter the rule testing. ...... "'. ' A rule should also be adopted stating if an association has more than a certain number of com- plaints against them in a season, then the GHSA should request game film, review it and if they find the complaints to be legiti- mate, then refuse to allow those officials to call again until they are retested. IT'S A KID'S GAME, but it's ruled by men. Men who call should know the rules, enforce them and make sure the rules are the same for everyone. I would like to note, willie there are some bad officials out there, usually there are more good ones than bad ones. The old cliche, "one bad apple can spoil the whole barrel" definitely holds true in officiating. A crew, like the one at Crim Friday night, makes all officials look bad. As a former official, I didn't like it at all. I spent endless hours study- ing, attending seminars and watching film to be good at the job. I certainly don't want to be made to look bad by a bunch of guys who think they can go out there and do the job without know- ing the rules or even caring if they make the right call. I think most officials would agree with me on this. Officials don',t want to be on the field with a man or woman who does not know the rules. Again, it is time for credibili- ty and accountability in officiat- ing. THE Hoc HOME NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscritm'on rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Medwether Counties; $20 a year eisevhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class poslage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR Sl3mxlOm call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816. : Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230, STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ............................... : ...................... . ......... John Kuykendall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Assistant Editor .......................................................................................... Rob Richardson Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ....................................................................... Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant Assistant AdveaJsing Manager ....................................................................... Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ................................................................................................ Lori Camp Assistant Edito ................. 2 ........................................................................ Rob Richardson Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith, 1.amen King Legals ............................................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Receptionist and Classifieds ......................... . .................................................... Cleta Young Production Manager .................... : ......................................................................... Todd Laird Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski COmPT OFFICES President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ............................................................................... : ....... Charlotte S. Grimes Secreumy ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treagurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counl and Assistant Sectary ..................................................... James S. Grimes I WOULD LIKE TO POINT out, however, I've worked with crews from both LaGrange and Columbus and never met an offi- cial who did not know the rules. Those associations are among the most respected in the state. It is because they follow the rules set forth by GHSA, they train their officials and they evaluate their performances. If other associations would follow their lead, the kid's game would be fun again for everyone. Especially the kids. The views expressed on the Opinion Page of the The Hogansville Home News are the expressions and ideas of each writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the management. EVERY OFFICIAL is going to miss something, make a mistake or occasionally let things slide if the game is out-of-hand. However, when you are calling a big game, one that determines playoff potential, you should take every play seriously and realize that one or two calls can completely change the game. It appears this season has been one of the worst as far as officiating is concerned. Maybe thereare not enough good people out there and the associations are taking anyone that will call. If that is the case, they should he trained before they step on the field. YOu should knew fl6t" atf you're out of positian, but first you have to know where you should be positioned to make the call. In the last two road games of the Manchester Blue Devils, and as a former official I hate to say it, "home cooking has played big in the outcome of the games." Each official association will usually grade or evaluate their officials. This helps to determine if they are good officiais, where their weaknesses He and what can be done to help them improve. If I were evaluating the officials from the Friday night Crim vs. Manchester game, the only thing I could report to the association would be this, "Get those guys off the field. They make us all look bad." They had at least 10 confer- ences and you could tell no one knew what should have been done about a certain call. They contin- ued to visit the home field bench and discuss the penalties with a Crim coach. The Manchester coaching staff quickly picked up on their lack of knowledge and began to point ?it out. Unfortunately, the officiating got worse, not better. The only thing good I can say about the officiating was that is was consistent. Consistently bad for both teams. However, there is no doubt Crim got the advan- tage. On Crim's second touch- down of the night, the back never crossed the plain of the goal line. It was clear to everyoxm, includ- ing the official on the opposite ably born with his nose turned up that way. I wasn't absolutely certain he was light in his loafers, but when he traveled across the restaurant escorting guests to their tables, he touched the floor only once or twice. "Table for three," I said to the maitre d', once he had landed back at his station. HE LOOKED AT me as ff he were looking at a dead cat in the highway. The right side of his lip curled upward, his nostrils half flared, and the lid of his left eye went to half-mast. "Gentlemen," he said, "are required to wear ties when they dine here." There are a number of phras- es I enjoy saying at times such as these, but my two companions were ladies, and I was afraid Donald Trump, who owns the Plaza, might be within earshot, so ! abstained. I wear ties only to funerals of close relatives or heads of state. I stopped wearing ties during the late to middle seventies because they made me feel uncomfortable. I especially hate to eat while wearing a tie. Once I was at a ban- quet and they served barbecued chicken with lots of red sauce on it. My tie at the beginning of the meal was blue. At the end, it was red. I gave the tie to my dog. He ate it. I'm also convinced ties restrict the blood flow to the brain, causing such disorders as forgetfulness, blurred eyesight, and even crimi- nal tendencies. A1Capone was rarely seen with- out a tie. The same goes, inciden- tally, for Richard Nixon. Anyway, I don't see what dif- ference it makes whether or not you wear a tie into a restaurant at least as long as you are wearing a jacket and clean underwear. I TOLD THE Plaza maitre d' I didn't own a tie, and he went into a closet and fetched one. It was black. Perfect for a blue blazer. The trouble was, I couldn't remember how to tie a tie. Neither of my companions could either. Getting terribly hungry now, = asked for help from the lady check- ing coats. She did a little better than the rest of us. When she finished tying the tie around my neck, the thin part that's supposed to be short was long, and the big part that's sup- posed to be long was short. Although I now looked complete idiot, wearing an rectly tied tie with a golf was shown to my table. I chuckled as I recalled a I saw recently in one Long Horn Steak Houses. Horns don't care tension. The sign said No Shoes, No Service. Optional. The meal was excellent. mayonnaise on my tie. BY SPECIAL WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, ED COLUMNS BY THE GRIZZARD, WHO GREW NEARBY BECAME THE MOST  GEORGIA WRITER OF HIS GRIZZARD BELONGED TO BELONGED TO THIS OF WHICH HE SO OFTEN OF 1-85 FROM NEWNAN HOGANSVII.LE IS NAMED IN! HONOR. THE LEWIS MUSEUM WAS MOREI,AND IN 1996, ING AND EDITING LAB IS DEDICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED TAPES ARE STILL AVAILABI SALE THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC NATIONWIDE. Seeking Restoration One More The fatal harm that did come to Franklin Roosevelt at Warm Springs is a familiar story now. He came down by train on March 30, 1945, looking almost as bad to his friends as he had looked when he came after the harrowing election campaign the previous falL The hard Washington winter and his advancing physical deteri- oration had left their mark. The train pulled into a station crowded with welcomers as usual. He descended to the ground via a small elevator -- the courageous walks down the special ramps had long since been abandoned. "Mike Reilly wheeled him to his blue Ford convertible and, with the aid of another agent, lifted him onto the passenger seat. An aid of anoth- er agent, lifted him into the passen- ger seat. AN AGENT DROVE him at the head of a small caravan onto the Foundation's grounds, past Georgia Hall and up to the Little White House. Patients and staff were on theporchandin frontofitat Georgia Hill. Not even the Thanksgiving Day dinners were a more honored tradition than the Georgia Hall wel- come and the Georgia Hall farewelL Roosevelt always came by there and waved or spoke when he arrived, always paused there to say goodbye when he left. 'Total resf' was the recommen- dation of Dr. Bruenn, who accom- partied him to Georgia This was to be a recuperating trip. Social life was going to be at a minimum, Roosevelt's staff told his old friends. He also avoided the pool. He spent his nonworking hours (which were at first most of his waking hours) chatting with his cousins, Laura Delano and Margaret Sucldey, who had become his frequent compan- ions at Warm SpringsandHyde Park, and being driven with them about the countryside. They made sever- al trips to Dowdell's Knob. There they just sat and looked at the signs of spring in the valley. HE WENT TO EaSter services with them at the Warm Springs Chapel on.April 1, allowing himself to be lifted from his wheelchair to sit in a regular pew, a custom he had always preferred. His paleness was emphasized by the white floral decorations, the soft light, his gray suit. He partiei- pated in the songs, responsive l ing and head as the other Springs friends tremor in his hands. He his prayer book once, another time. Not once services did he smile. On Monday, brought Elizabeth Shournatoff' her, to do a watercolor wa gra3 convertible ten days Springs effect. 'q?he weather," Dr. wrote, 'as decided improvement He had begun to eat with rested beautifully, lent spirits." Daisy oatmeal gruel as snack. At mealtimes he was asking for second helpingS. aftern6on drives in the under the hot Georgia brought color back to his ' (Next week: The REHABILITATION Making the Best In less than one week we Americans will be exercising one of the greatest privileges any person could possess. Of course you prob- ably already know what I'm refer- ring to, I am referring to the privi- lege of voting. There is a great eon- cern among Americans as to who will be our next president. Who will lead our country next is a vital issue with us, but another issue we need to take up is the motive behind the vote that is cast. Sadly, there will be literally thousands of Americans who will not exercise their God given privilege to vote next week, but almost as sad is the reason many do vote. Before you put the article down fearing I'm going to tell howto vote, don. If you desire my opinion I will gladlygive it, but the purpose today isn't necessarily to tell you who to vote for, but maybe share a little that will help you to make up your mind. In listening to the news shows where everyday Americans have been interviewed, in listening to the can- didates themselves and.in listening to the "spin doctors," one of the major factors in making that vital decision is the condition of the economy. It is true that life seems easier when the pocketbook is full, but my ques- tion is, "Is that and should that be our number one priority?" We hear of tax cuts and lock boxes for Social Security. We hear of spending for education and the military. It seems that every issue has as its founda- tion money and the economy. Don think for a minute that I am trying to minimize the importance of these issues, but I am trying to take some of the attention from them to what (I feel) are more important issues. The things referred to are issues of right and wrong, issues of char- acter and integrity, issues of moral- ity and decency. No matter what side of the aisle you line up with or what "religious persuasion" you boast of, I believe all Americans want this nation to be the greatest nation on Earth and to continue on for many years to come. The secret to that happening is not in a strong econo- my. May I share with you a verse from Proverbs 14. The Bible says in verse 34, 'IRighteousness exalteth a nation: but sin is a reproach 1 she must stay fight. "When America ceases to she will cease to be issue of ] asking ourselves what didate do for what will he do that does he tion, homosexuality, prayer place of God in our does the candidatq is to be exalted, she the sin inside her borders. Aiready "But preacher, I've got to In closing this article a verse with 6:33, "But seek' of God, and his all these things shall be you." 13ear children of God, 3 would only put God first in otff and , He to suppb me( but weigh the heaviest in making and for the child of t I ask is that you seek the before casting bless Americal