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Manchester, Georgia
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November 4, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
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November 4, 1999
 

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THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usps 62o-o4o , MmE HAm PUBIJSHEIffADVERTISING DIRF_L'R JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDITOR MAroON (TEv) SMrm IANAGING EDITOICAL DIRECTOR  WnJmlcr BusmTs MANAGER me Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 A (Orim publivatm P.o. Box Mil B. Gmm,  Hogansville, Georgia 30280 T My First Love I guess we all can remem- ber our firsf love. John Although I met my first Kuykendail love some 25 years or so ago, .... there isn't much I don't remember about her. I can still remember the feeling that rushed through- out my body the moment I saw the one that was right for me. I remember thinking how much I would love to have her learn as much as I could. for my own and how hard I At every opportunity t I had to work to get her. would ask any male around for It was love at first sight.., tips at making things better there has never been any for her. I wanted to do every- doubt about it. To this day, thing right and didn't have the there has been nothing that needed experience or know could compare to that feeling how, but I knew the older guys I got when I finally made her did. mine. She and I lasted all the way Oh the times we had through high school. Oh, the together. Those were the best times we had together. You times of my life. There was never saw me without her and nothing I wouldn't do for her I didn't want to be without her. and she was the only thing that We were inseparable. mattered to me in the entire As with all good things universe, however, it finally came to an Every chance I got, I'd go end. Sometimes I wish I could ' shopping for little trinkets to go back in time and retrieve help make her even prettier her and never let her go. She and my friends envious of her. would be mine forever. I really wanted to make them However, we must all pay jealous. I wanted them to for our mistakes. Mine was know she was mine and they meeting a girl and getting couldn't have her. married. Of course, improving per - After I put the ring on my fection isa-task and cer- finger I figured it was time to tainly hard as a 16 year-old say goodbye to the sports car that knows nothing about and buy a real car. What a mis- things like that. But I tried to take that was! THE HOGANSVlL HOME NEWS is llbllshed weekly by the Star-Mercury lJblish  Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgm 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $15 in Meriwether, Talbot or Hams Counties, $20 a year elsewhe. Prkes indude ell sales tas. Second class postage paid at Hogamvilk, Gcorgin 30230. FoR suescmtoNs call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Sta Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Geccgia 31816. POSTMASW: Send addr--s changes to P. O. lka 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. Srsr Pubfisher and  Director ..................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................. John Kuyndall Managing Editor and Technical Director ............................................ Marion (Ted) Smith Business Manager ...................................................................................... LeeAnn Wdbert Associate Editors ......................... Billy Bryant/Talboa Michael Snider/Harris County Bryan Getex, Caroline Yeagex/Cncenvilk, lee N. Howell Staff Writer ......................................................................................................... J. Dan Stout Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ .Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .................................. : ........................................................... Linda Photography ................................................................................................... J:hal Snidef Composing .................................................................................... Vanda lvery, Dori Green Lcgais ......................................................................... : ....................................... Valinda lvery Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Clem Young room ..................................................... : ................. mid SoS W C.,w CommIx OmJs President .........................................................................................................  Grimes Vice President ......................................................................................... Charlotte S. Grimes tary ................................................................................................. lama Grim Cor Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Cain C, arr Legal Counsel attd Amistant Secretary ..................................................... James S. Chimes OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILL HOME NEWS - NOVEMBER 3, 1999 George W. Bush a Presidential Nominee Texas governor George W.Bush has become the odds on favorite to win the Republican presidential nom- ination next year. His recent spats with the more ideological members of his party's right wing seem only to have enhanced his standing in the national pres- idential polls wthen matched up with a Democrat - sort of like then candidate Bill Clinton's argument with Sister Soul jab enhanced his standing in the polls against the GOP front runner in 1992. Vice President A1 Gore seems on the verge of regain- ing his stranglehold on the Democratic Party's nomina- tion after his early endorse- ment by the strongest voice in organized labor in the country the AFL-CIO. Thus with the two major party nominations seeming- ly wrapped up at this early stage of the campaign, most of the interest is in who will get the Reform Party nomi- nation. It is unlikely that whoev- Lee N. Howell Associate Ed er gets the Reform Party's' nod will win the presidential election, but since it's the only game in town, all us polit- ical groupies are interested in watching. The Reform front runner at this point is Republican also-ran Pat Buchanan. If Buchanan does get the nom- ination, it will be a classic case of politics making strange bedfellows. the Reform Party, as envi- sioned by founder Ross Perot, is fiscally conservative and socially moderate, with a hefty dose of political reform. That is the platform on which Perot ran and on which the party is organized. While Buchanan is a fis- cal conservative and his views would be somewhat compatible with those of Reform party voters, his social agenda would be anath- ema to most of them. Buchanan supports mandatory prayer in schools, public funding for religious education and the abolition and criminalization of abor- tion. Reform voters are, to put it mildly, "secular" vot- ers. Many of them probably applauded Jesse Ventura's comments during his recent interview with Playboy in which the attacked the sani- ty of those who are actively involved with religion, even if they personally may not have been so blatant in their description of their fellow citizens. Political analyst Albert J. Menendez pointed out in a recent article in the Washington Post, "If Buchanan takes a hard look at" past voting patterns, he might rethink his interest in the Reform Party nomina- tion." Menendez points out the areas carried by Peroti Colorado voted 70 against tuition tax public schools in a 1998 erendum and also su gay rights that same year. 1 precincts that were most strongly by Perot Washin ingly rejected a that would ban tions. Menendez further that the precint around fundamentalist bastion Bob Jones University Buchanan nearly 50 perce of the 1996 GOP r South Carolina but gave only two percent of their in the election. Buchanan still able to take over the Party because of their nominating Wthether his winmng nomination would most of the party's ents to give their votes t0! man who represents a laundry list if items oppose is another question. Depression Hits Roosevelt's Farm (Another in a series.) Despite his desire to make his farming operation prof- itable, Roosevelt soon found that that was easier said than done. The "Southern Depres- sion" before 1929 was bad; the national Depression following the crash of that year made things worse even in Georgia. In the year before the crash, per capita farm income in Georgia had been only $145. By the year Roosevelt was elected President, that had dropped to $74. On his own farm, Roosevflt found he was playing the gen- tleman farmer--if not the squire or the patron--in the sense that he was subsidizing his work force. They were hard workers; they were proficient; Roosevelt's overseership was informed and enlightened--and all of this did not add up to earn- ings in excess of expenses and investment. In part this was due to Roosevelt's being too enlight- ened. Having a full-time farm manager, to whom he paid $100 a month and provided a house, was unusual, even extravagant for those times in that place. No cotton farm in Meriwether County had a manager at that time. The largest peach orchards did have managers, but none received that sort of pay. In addition to paying Doyle, Roosevelt also paid $50 a month to Otis Moore to handle the cat- tle herd. That was about what the managers made at the best peach orchards. Roosevelt's payroll was almost surely the highest of any farm of similar size in south- west Georgia. In March 1930, for example, his monthly pay- roll was $195 - $100 for Doyle, $50 for Moore, $15 for one "wage hand" and $10 each to three oth- ers. At that rate, he could expect his annual payroll to be $2,340. Yet when he prepared his 1929 income tax return that month, he had to notice that his:gross income on the farm the year before had been only $2,275.35. And of course, there were a great many more expenses than just payroll--seed, fertilizer, fencing, building repairs, equip- ment maintenance, etc. As the Depression deepened, Roosevelt increased his payroll Moore got $75 a month after January 1931; and the wage hands got raises to $25 for one and $17.50 each for two others. (One was let go.) In 1929, his expenses exceeded gross income by a whopping $3,184.08. At that point the farm was still essentially a cotton farm, with about two-thirds of its income derived from cotton, a situation Roosevelt eventually ended--temporarily. Income from cattle in 1929 was only $65.41. The farm was gradual- The Squire of Warm Springs ByTheo ly going out of the peach busi- ness. Doyle and Roosevelt had been urging such a course on each other from the start. "My labor bill fro" pieking, packing, grading peaches added to 'the cost of containers amounts to more than all the peaches will bring," Doyle wrote Roosevelt the summer before he decided to run for Governor. Roosevelt wrote on several occasions in the next few years that he saw no future for the peach business. Roosevelt urged other enterprises. For example, he had what was apparently the first Concord grape orchard in the area. It had never done well in south Georgia. Two men named Scott and Stuckey were trying to develop a better-yielding grape to sub- stitute for the native scupper- nong. Roosevelt knew of their work and ordered a vineyard on a slope of his own farm. In early years this varied from 2 to 1 or 12 acres. It brought in income at first, $22.15 in for example. But later, Roosevelt became so known, roadside sales to an Atlanta amounted to over of grapes one year. Roosevelt also raised. sale at a roadside stand, es, spinach, peppers, ons, cantaloupes, tomatoes, string beans and there was mohair from goats, wool from Roosevelt wrote DoyI6 in that what he ought to do is neighboring farmers to their produce to his stand him, Doyle, to sell. "If we make even a slight profit, keeps the trade going," he The grapes never caught with other farmers in the but Roosevelt and his Cason Callaway did get farmers to try apple for Roosevelt to boast to a of agriculture writers "for the first time" could be bought in stores in south Georgia. is hot very encouraging for the people of the state Washington, but it is a correct development," he (Next week: Cattle continue falling.) My Friend - Willie Lee Black I wish that, just for this er, but I only remember a few. " ............................................................................ our1 moment, I had the ability of a Mrs. Bea Black still lives in Allan Dee it up as we had work to do, Hemingway to write about this the same house they occupied when he and Mr. Link were man, but since I don, well have and I trust she will forgive me Dodson 00f00renc00, I was in a to do the best we can with what for anything I say. After all, Bea since Mr. Link was plant we have. knew him better than I. Bea is a er.I would lookl Willie Lee worked in the splendid woman and used to warehouse at the then U.S. come to our house many years : ....... ......... :: maybe go to the rest room. .............  n't want him to Rubber. In those days, we ran ago. Willie Lee told me one day, ::i: me or Willie Lee, and I still only cotton. Cotton bales weigh 'Mr. Allan, ff you could just be a ':::;i::i:;A i he would have gone 2 to 1 about 450to600pounds, and they black man one Saturday night, Willie Lee. Willie Lee liked were moved on hand trucks, you would never want to be white I know, he never got too old. long cars with plenty Willie Lee was a small man, but again." Looking at the happiness One morning Vtrtllie Lee came room. He sometimes had he could move two bales to any- Willie Lee evidenced, I wasn't so in looking sad. He said he was luck with his cars. Told me one else's one. Trucking cotton is sure but that he was right. Willie having trouble and had prayed, he had the only car that not just a matter of strength - it Lee liked the women and evi- His prayer went, "Oh, Lord, I am use two quarts of oil at night isskin, properbalance, andknow- " dently the women liked Willie having trouble, bad trouble, ting in the back yard. We how. It was a revelation and a Lee. He either had an active and Please come down and help me. each other when we were pleasure to watch him truck cot- vivid imagination, or it was the And, Lord, don send any of your He came to the house ton. But it is not about trucking real thing. At that titne, I would disciples - you come yourself!" timeslater and we would cotton I wish to write, but Willie have welcomed just the vivid Willie Lee and Bea lived in a of the old days. He died in Lee, the man. The name proba- imagination! house owned by Mr. Charlie Sims early '70s and our town lost a bly doesn't mean anything to Vrffiie Lee said,"Don't ever go (Truitt's daddy), the warehouse tleman and an most of you, but ff yon ever met home and rush right in the house, man. He was behind on his rent character. I hope we can him, you would remember, as I Stop on your porch, kick your and Mr. Charlie threatened to again someday and this time "do. Ask Mr. Mike Link Mike con- feet, shuffle a little and give the evicthim.Theywereintheoffice, Black, I really want suited him frequently and some- back door time to slam - then go and I heard threats, begging and all you told me was the truth, a timesat great length. He was the in."Ifyouhaveafinesupperwith some crying. I knew Mr. Charlie I know he told me the tru sage of the company. Witty, a pile of pork chops, don't ask had a soft heart and wasnt going along towards the last, humorous, andalwayswithajoke where the money came from for to throwhim out, but Willie Lee saying a word. He to tell and even a good listener, all this food - just eat it!" When didn. Finally, Willie Lee agreed breathing trouble and would Later on, when we got lift trucks, WillieLee met a woman, he would to move ff Mr. Sims would lend to his doctor for medicine the best driver I've ever seen. take of his hat and say, "Yes, him enough money to rent a return to his truck, barely The first man on the job in the Ma'am." Can you think of a bet- truck. Mr. Charlie loaned him the to keep his seat, mornings and ff shipping wasn ter way? I can't, moneyandW'fllieLeegaveitright was finished by five o'clock, Willie I never knew Willie Lee to back to him for the rent, and, telling, that he was a man. Lee would stay on no matter how take a drink of alcohol, someone askedforareceiptWfllieLeewas courage, ofhonor, ofdedicati long it toolc If I could remember asked him why, and he replied, smart! Everyone would stop and and most of all, my friend. only a small part of W'fflie Lee's "I'm saving that for when I get talk to Willie Lee for his words I wish I had told him so sayings, it would make a best sell- too old for the womenY So fa as of wisdom. Since he was one of instead of waiting until now..j