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Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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November 4, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
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November 4, 2004
 

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Op" " &ld lnlons eas PAGE 4-A - HOGANSVR~ HOME NEWS -~SDm, NOV. 4, 2004 ..... T he .................... Ult ate Femil ne Weapon The Wacky Stories Behind Police News For several months now, it has been my responsibility to cover police news for our newspapers. The "police beat," as it is referred to by almost every newspaper in the world, can sometimes be a challenge and awfully inter- esting. For all the police stories you see in a newspaper, I can tell you there are many oth- ers that do not make it for one reason or another. When I say that covering police news can be interesting, it is because of the crazy things you read on reports. People can do some strange things. Here are a few examples: A couple of weeks ago in Harris County, a man was caught doing over 90 miles per hour on the interstate. If I remember correctly, it was the high 90s. A sane person would know that if you are traveling down an interstate and doing more that 20 miles per hour over the speed limit chances are good you are going to get stopped. When you figure in the fact that man didn't have a dri- ver's license because ~ had , been suspended an~~ wasexpire_d, thaV~u, ....... ~ ~*,~--. ~.- ble whammy. He just tripled his chances of being stopped by a police officer, but it did- n't phase him nor stop him from exceeding the speed limit. It gets worse. Once, and I can't remember now in what city but I know it was in Alabama, I picked up a police report about a woman that had been charged for drug pos- session. Ironically, she was the one that called police. It seems the woman visit- ed a local drug dealers home where she had purchased drugs many times before to buy some marijuana. After the purchase, she thought the dealer had not given her the amount of marijuana she,~ thought she should have received. She confronted the deal- er, but he wouldn't give her anymore marijuana. After her attempt to get the dealer to give her the additional drugs failed, she ~.,~! police and told them the story. The police arrived on the scene. The woman was searched and arrested for drug possession. The point I'm trying to make is that people do some pretty stupid things that land them in jail. Once in jail of course, tben they try and find a way to justify what they have done. I listened with interest to a story Paul Harvey was broadcasting on Thursday of last week. While it wasn't a funny one, it does give you an idea of how people will use any excuse to justify a crime they have committed. According to Harvey, a man was on trial for electro- cuting his wife. It seems the woman was taking a bath and the man cut a wire~ from a home appliance, stripped it raw, plugged it in and dropped it in the tub with her. Of course, everyone knows what happens when you drop a live electrical wire into a tub of water. So, of course the woman was killed. During his trial, the man told the judge and jurors, with crying eyes, that he was try- ing to save his marriage. "I thought a near death experi- ence would save my mar- riage," he stated in court. ,,, I ~i,~e h~ NOW YOU see what I mean by reporting police news can be interesting. Now for the challenging. There are several things that makes police news chal- lenging. First of all, deciding what news to print or not print. For example, men andwomen are arrested every day on charges like battery, sex crimes, making terroristic threats, etc. which usually stems from a divorce or child custody case. Should you print the story, "even though that person is cleared in a court of law, their name is tarnished. So, you have to make a deci- sion whether the story has any merit. Another thing that makes ~lice news challenging, is owing that whatever you print is going to make some- one'~aa& I can't tell you how man~,calls I receive, almost every Week, about a police news story. There are many other [ things that makes reporting police news a challenge. However, the interesting stuff you find out more than makes .up for the challenges. Let's face it. Poli~ news sells newspapers. Most read- ers will tell you they want to read good news, but those catchy headlines are what sell. I love writing police news as much as our subscribers like reading it. TI~ HOGANSVlia,E HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company. a division of Caimes Publicatiom, at 3051 Rooses~it Highway. Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Merig~'ther Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FoR gqw~am,ru~s call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercur~ Publicatiom, P. O. Box 426, Manchesler, Gev~ia 31816. Send address changes to R O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. SrA~ Publi~ and Editor ............................................................................ John Kukyendall Adv~ing Director .................................................................................. Laurie Lewis Associate Editor .................... . ............................................................. Clint Claybrook Asshtant Editor ............................ : ............................................... +....~Rob Richardson .Staff Writers ......................................................................... ~Bryan Get~. Billy Bryant Composition .............................. Dewayne Rowe~, Robert Weep-~, Gad Youngblood Circulation Iv~ .................... . ..................................................... Tracy Lynn Wyatt Pre,~s Mana_ger ................................................................................ Way,e ~i President .................................................................... .. ...................... Millard B. Griw#s Vice Presi~ .................................................... . ........................... ~ S. Grin~s Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ lama Grimes Cofer Treasurer. ........ ,...~ ................................... : ................................... Knthy Grimes C~mtt Legal Ccmnsel ~ Assistant Secretary ................................... . .......... James S. Grimes Cryingis the ultimate fem- inine weapon. As they will not admit they are pouting, nei- ther will they admit that the clear liquid running down their face and smearing mas- cara on their cheeks is actu- ally tears. "Why are you crying?" "rm not crying." Wes, you are. I can see you are crying." "I don~ know how you can see me crying if you don't notice anything else about me." Check quickly. Hair? No. She's lost weight? No. She's wearing a new shade of lip- stick? No. She's had the ear- ring holes in her ears plugged back up? Not that either. "Give me a hint? "If you don't know what I'm talking about, it's no use to give you a hint." THAT, OF COURSE, makes no sense whatsoever, but when a woman is crying, nothing she says or doe.~will make any sense. ~Okay, I give up. Please tell me what I didn~ notice? turned the bed in a dif- ferent direction, and you've Slept in it three nights and haven~ noticed." Dandruff, large snarling dogs, thunderstorms, and mountain ranges I notice. Beds turned in a different direction, I don't. I always have had to work up to a good cry. Sometimes it takes me several hours and two six-packs to feel sorry enough for myself to start bawling. Not so with women, I learned. They can cry on cue, and they can cry about 'most anything. It is their ability to cry at the moment they are stopped for a traffic violation, as a rnat- ter of fact, that continues to keep the burden on men to pay most of the traffic frees in this country. Very few policemen are able to write out a ticket to a crying woman after they have stopped her. If a man cried after being stopped for a traf- fic violation, he risks being hauled in as some sort of per- vert. ONLY ONCE have I ever seen a policeman strong enough to resist not giving a woman a ticket because she Was crying. Paula was behind the wheel of our 1966 Volkswagen Bug on her birthday as we drove aloag a state road. She was speeding. A country policeman pulled her over. The moment she saw the blue light of his patrol car begin to whirl around, she broke into tears. The officer came to her side of the car, checked her driver's license, and began to write out a ticket. "But officer," Paula man- aged to get out between sobs, "it's my birthday." Sure enough. The officer checked her driver's license again and it was, indeed, her birthday. I knew what was comin_g next. ~ell, little lady," the aver- age policeman would say, hop- ing to dry her tears," we can~ give you a ticket on your birth- day, can we? I'll just give you a warning this time, and you try to slow down a little bit, O.IC?" Not this policeman. He motioned to his fellow officer waiting in the patrol earto join him. When the second officer arrived, the first said, "Guess what ? Today is this little lady's birthday. What do you think we ought to do for her?" "I don~ know," said the sec- ond officer, "but I guess we ought to do something." They looked at each other and were silent a moment as the tension Suddenly they took of steps back from our car; began to sing, "H Birthday to You .... H Birthday to You..." When they were finis~ singing, the second offi~ went back to his car, and ~" ~ ( first finished writing Pa~ her speeding ticket. I, m~ I while, was bent double in seat, howling, with laught~~ "You don t love me, said as we drove away, a hatchof tears rolling do cheeks. What manner of men wet~ these policemen? I thought myself. How could they crumple into putt3 hag woman? possibly avoid the feeling, guilt? ...to be continued week BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMI~ WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, HOME NEWSIS CARRYING SEL~ EV COLtrMNS BY rrm LAT~ L~ CmZZASD. WHO GREW UP IN ~T~ BY MORELAND, AND BECAME TI~: MOST WIDELY READ GEORGI~ vatmm o~ ms rtmr. cmzz~at~ BOOKS AND TAI~S ARE STIll, AVAI~ ABLEFOR KM,E'rHROUGH BAD BoOY PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND BOOK AND MUSIC STORES NATIOI~ Finishing Well is More lmporta The American lmet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow said, "Great is the art of beginning, but greater is the art of end- hag. Many years before King Solomon had some~__~ simi- lnr ,to,,.,~y~,,,l~, said,,im Ecclesiastes 7:8, "Better is the end of a thing than the begin- ning thereof: and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit? When I was playiug sports in high school, it was every player's goal to "start" the game. As time went on, I found that it wasn't necessarily the best who started, but it was the ones who finished that counted. We find that many people start things, but a large per- cenmge never finish. AS we study the Bible, one certain individual comes to mind that bears the same char- acteristics. Most know him as the strongest man in the Bible, Samson. Samson was a young boy that had all the opportunities and privileges needed to end up being used greatly of God. Samson gives us the story of one who hadallthe right begin- nings, but finished in the wrong way. Some one once said, "Privileges are no guarantee of succe~and good begin- nings do not guarantee good endings." How could it be that a young man with all the right tools to live right, die in such a wrong way? In a close examination of Samson's life, several things could be named, but allow me to call your attention to three of them. The first thing that led to Samson's downfall was that he had a desire that was con- trolled by the things of this world. Samson had a wander- ing eye for women with whom he should not have anything to do. As an Israelite, he was instructed not to marry out- side the faith of the Jews, but he was so controlled by his desire for worldly things, he began his downfaU. We must understand, the things of this world will not satisfy the needs of the heart SECONDLY, Samson was ealleused by his disrespect f~r his parents. In Judges 14, we find Samson demanding his father to get the woman from Timnath for his wife. Samson had become so engrossed in this world, it had now turned his heart from his very own parents. If a young person wants to finish in a wrong way, just let him dis- honor and disobey his parent~ As my wife and I spend time with our cldest son at the football field, I am appalled at the way some of the children treat their parents. It is a shame the disrespect that some children show their morns and dads. A~s hard as we may be on 50 Years Ago... / the children for their disre i~r~.~ spect and disobedience, they parents must bear the respo~_ sibility for the attitudes ofi'.a[la~n their childrert I feel a lot of the proble~I |For stems from ~ (a~ ,m,~y p,~: IRhc ents wait toolat~t,~trairr ! ~0:: hag their children to respect and obey their authority. ! ~ n Samson did not finish well | R~ !. because he developed a disre- spect for his parents, rc THE FINAL THING that 9~ hindered Samson from living 11 out the call of God for his life is the same problem many a H Christian has today. That is they are careless in their devo- tion for the Lord. Samson had a special call from God, he had made spe- cial vows to the Lord, but he was careless in keeping then~ Before long, he had broken every oneofhis Nazarite vows. It is great to begin, but it is even greater to fmisl~ May we all be able to say like the apostle Paul, "I have finished my course..? Intl~ Hogansville Herald premeus~tolhe ~ tlemeNem -BIG S~EP- A new trer~l in 1P~ nallon was finally hiti~ng Hogansville, according to a front page article in the Nov. 4, 1954 edi- Son of the ~ Heratd. "Bin Sm~a, represen~ the Hogansvle Lions Oub, and Dr. Bmee Head, dentist, met with the etty council last Monday to discuss the fact of flouddatlon of water and cost indud- ed to add flouride to water in Hogansville." MODERN MARVB.~ "Hogamv~k~ foot- ball fans welcome the erection of a new scoreboa~ and ek~de clock for the kx:al high e~mol flatd. The large electdc clock shows the exact time remaining in each quarter of the game." ,SEEMS SMALL, NOW - An inside arti- cle noted that the population of the U.S. had ~ 160 ~, ~ to the U.S. Census Bureau. Eslbrmles for 2004 now hover around 280 million. CINEMA TIME - Sin and action contin- ued to be strong bends in movies play- ing at Hogans~'s Royal Theatre. Showing that week were "Hell Below Zero," "Born to be Bad,"Human Desire," "Playgid," "Duel in the Sun," =Charge of the Lancers" and "The Captain's Parade." BUILDING ON UP - "First Methodist C, hurch, ~, ~ in a campa~ for funds fora new ct-~ch ~. The esti- mated cost of the new building is set at $50,000, ~h smotmt b tt~ ~ ol tim esmpa~."