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Manchester, Georgia
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November 13, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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November 13, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - Nov. 13, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620..040 .k (6fitne,J htltlkatmn Millard B. Grimes, President JOHN KUYKENDALL PUBLISHERDITOR IuRm 'wm ADVERTISING DIRECTOR CLINT CLAYBROOK ASSOCIAte: EDrroR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTAi'WF EDITOR t JAYNE GOLDSTON U USINE.'q MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansvflle, Georgia 30230 Having a Little to Say About a Whole Lot... THANKS FOR BEING CIVIC MINDED Well, the election is over and all is said and done. Those elected to office are looking to the future with optimism and establishing lists of items that need addressing. In some areas, like Harris County, government Officials are relieved that the Special Local Option Sales Tax (SPLOST) was passed so they can continue to do works to improve the county and their respective cities. All in the all, the turnout for each election was pretty good. Surprising in Harris County where the SPLOST was the only thing on the.bal- lot, except for a couple of city elections. The point is, people turned out even though the experts were predicting a low one. There could be a num- ber of reasons for this, but I believe in the rural commu- nities, such as ours, people are more concerned about the future of their respective county or city and people today and are more civic minded. Simply put, people today want to see the/r city or coun- ty grow into something they can be proud of. The want a bright future for their chil- dren and other generations and it shows when they go to the polls the way they did this past week. I would like to say thanks to everyone that did. A WORD TO OUR VETERANS This week we celebrate Armistice Day, or as we all call it today... Veterans' Day. Here's just a little histo- ry about Armistice Day. It was Nov. 11, 1918 (if my U.S. history lessons are still as vivid as I think they are) that armistice was declared and World War I came to an end. That was a terrible war with Europe and was even called, "The War to End all Wars." Little did anyone know that the U.S. would soon be back on the battle field again battling Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan in World War II. It was only five years later that Communists attempted to seize South Korea and precipitated the Korean War. In 1954, one year after the truce ended the Korean War; the name was changed to Veterans' Day to honor all U.S, veterans. Since the Korean War, our forces have been sent to oth- ers places such as Vietnam, Grnada and the Middle East. Even now, our service men and women are in Iraq battling terrorism and fight- ing for freedom for all peo- ple. At the present time, there are over 26 million veterans in the United States of America. Georgia has its fair share and has seen an 11 per- cent increase in its number of veterans since 1990. According to the census, there are about 768,000 vet- erans living in Georgia. Many of my family mem- bers, co-workers and even neighbors are veterans and I'm proud of each and every one of them. For what they stand for, for what they have done for 0urnation and above all, for what they have done for the world as a whole. We owe them a great indebted- ness that we can never repay. So, on Veterans' Day, we should tell each of them that we thank them, we appreci- ate them and we realize our world would be much differ- ent without them. It is my prayer that God will bless those that are presently serving and their families, those who have served and those that will in years to come and thank them for giving me the freedom that I cherish so much today. A WORD TO MY WEEKLY READERS I would like to say thank you to my weekly readers for the words of encouragement I have received in recent weeks. Writing a weekly column is sometimes difficult. It's hard to find a topic each week that is suitable and once you do, trying to get your mes- sage across can be just as dif- ficult. However, writing my weekly column is one of my favorite things to do. It not only allows me to express myself, but allows the read- ers to get to know me. I've received a few phone calls recently, and been told personally by some, how much they enjoy my weekly column. I want to say thank your kindness and hope you will continue to enjoy my weekly column. Tile II()GANS% ILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishin Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Roovelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Itarris or Meriether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales laxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. f()i st BSCRIPTIONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. Pos'rM ts i i.m Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA ,30230. STAFF Ptblisher aml k-ditor. ........................................................................... John Kukyendall AdverlisfiL Director. ................................................................................. Laurie Lewis Associate Editor .................................................................................. '.Clint Claybrook 3,siness Manager. ................................................................................ Jayne Goldston ssislant Editor. .................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff WriteP, .......................................................................... Bryan Geter.Billy Bryant ('ompa)sing ............................................................ Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems egals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston 2irculation Manager ............................................................... Barbara Arlene Steerman ress Manager. ................................................................................ Wayne Grochowski ?ressroom Assistants ..................... Larry Colleges, Zaddie Dixn'Dm'nell Mcauley Vlailrt)m Dislrilnltion ............................................................................... David Boggs CORPORATE OFFICERS ?resident ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President ............................................................ : ..................... Charlotte S. Grimes Execu!i',e Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer rreasarcr. ........................................... : .......................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Cansel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grirfies TV Football Offers Closer From Lewis Grizzard's collection "Don't Sit Under the Grits Tree With Anyone Else But Me" I have watched a lot of football games on television this year. In some ways, foot- ball is a lot better on televi- sion than ia is in person. The rest rooms are not as far away when you watch the game on television, for instance. What else is great about watching the game on the tube is you get to see the play- ers close up. Sometimes they will even show taped inter- views of the players. ''WHILE the action is slow on the field, let's show you an interview with Dallas line- backer Eldo (Mad Dog) Rado taped before the game. "Eldo, what are Dallas's chances of getting into the Super Bowl this season?" "Well, you know, if we, you know, can, you know, win, you know, a, you know, couple of, you know, games this, you know, season, then, you know, we, you know, got a, you know, pretty good, you know, uh, chance, you know." What has become a silly practice on televised games, however, is focusing the cam- era on players while they are on the sidelines, drinking Gatorade, spitting or eating some of the Astroturf. It is human nature to attempt to perform, or say something clever, when you go one-on-one with a televi- sion camera. All football players say the same thing in that situa- tion. They say, "Hi, Morn." If I have seen one football player say, "Hi, Mom," to a tel- evision camera this season, I. have seen a thousand. I WOULD LIKE for a football player to think of something original occasion- ally when he is before the camera. "Hi, Dad," would do for starters. Or, "I would like to take this opportunity to thank both my parents for making me eat the right foods and get my rest so that I would grow strong and tall and be able to come out here on Sunday afternoons and tear my oppo- nents limb from limb." And why stick to rela- tives? Hi, Bettyann, I know I said I would call, but golly the big game was coming up and we had practice all week, and I got this bad case of jock itch, and then I got drunk and lost my playbook, and that girl who answered the phone at my apartment when you called the other night was my cousin from who's a nun." Or why not try to something meaningful to "Remember, my Americans, that the game t life is a lot like have to tackle block your fears, and your points when you opportunities; some bad dude like Mean Coca-Cola is gonna along and stomp your right into the ground." BY SPECIAL WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, HOME NEWS ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE GRIZZARD, WH BY MORELAND, MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS BOOKS AND TAPE, ABLEFOR$ PRODUCTIONS, p.o. BOX ATLANTA. GA 31118-1266 AND WIDE. Is It Free Speech or Filthy Smut America is a great nation. Many people see the founda- tion of that greatness as lying in different aspects of our country. To hear recent popular politicians speak, that great- ness is in diversity, while oth- ers find that greatness in school technology, medical advances and the like. There are others still who find America's greatness in her Declaration of Independence, her Constitution, and her Bill of Rights. It is true that these things set America head and shoulders apart $rom the rest of the world, but I like what French writer Alexis de Tocqueville, after visiting America in 1831, said, "I sought for the greatness of the United States in her com- modious harbors, her ample rivers, her fertile fields, and boundless forests - and it was not there. I sought for it in her rich mines, her vast world commerce, her public school system, and in her institu- tions of higher learning - and it was not there. I looked for it in her democratic Congress and her matchless Constitution - and it was not there. Not untiLI went into the churches of America and heard her pulpits flame with righteousness did I under- stand the secret f her genius power. America is great because America is good, and if America ever ceases to be good, America will cease to be greatl" That is a message that n'eeds to once again be heard from our pulpits. America is being inundated with a constant flow of filth from pornographic cesspools. Someone has made the statement, "Not since Manhattan Island was sold for $24 has so much dirt been available for so little money as today." THESE proponents of pornography claim free speech as their right to pro- mote their perverted pic- tures. If our forefathers saw what is done in the name of free speech, I honestly believe they would shutter in horror. The First Amendment does not guarantee totally free speech. For you see a person cannot slander some- one without being held accountable, nor can you liable someone without being prosecuted. A person cannot yell "Fire!" in a crowded build- ing, nor can something be falsely advertised. Even the use of certain speech can be limited if it is proven that the speech insights violence. Speech is free as long as it does not bring harm to anoth- er. May I submit to you that the wickedness that is sold even in our local stores and bleeds through our own cable TV is not free speech but filthy smut. Pornography is not a harmless pass time but a terrible cancer that is spreading throughout our country. It is not free speech becauseitis harmful. Tothose that say let people do their own thing nd we shouldn't interfere may I ask a ques- tion? If a restaurant was sell- ing contaminated meat should something be done to stop it or should that business be allowed to continue? The point is that America had been sold a bill of goods telling them that pornogra- phy isn't harmful. Proverbs 14:34 says, "Righteousness exhalteth a nation; but sin is a reproach to any people." Pornography is harmful because it is a perversion of the way God intended things to be between a a wife. Whether label of hardcore or homosexuality ol marital sex or adultery, forms of pornography destructive. Pornography will people personally, it destroy people catty, it will destroy socially, it will destroy ple nationally, and it destroy people There are numerous ed organizations seeking t destroy the very moral rie of this country. instance, in Los there is the Renae Society whose slogan "Sex by year eight or else too late have no religious can be cited as to the tive nature of pornography. pornography, Dr. Merritt quoted Burke as saying, "The thing necessaD umph, is for good men to nothing." All across this we must take a this the greatness close, Dr. Merritt said in same message, beauty, but pornography the beast." 50 Years Ago... In the Hogansville Herald Predecessor tothe HogansVille Home News ,,ON TOP OF OLD SMOKEY - The front page of the Nov. 12, 1953 Hogansville Herald carded news about the riveted steel smoke stack at Stark Mill being replaced with a brick one, by "colorful Irishman Thomas J Murphy, who can talk as fast as he can lay brick." WELCOME IMPROVEMENT -The grand jury presentments concluded that Hogansville's jail was"as clean as could be expected," but did suggest that it needed additional toilets BEFORE INFLATION - The ad for Jabaly's offered, in its "weekend spe- cials," men's suits for $22.50. CINEMA - Judging by the titles, it was apparently intemational week at The Royal Theatre. F.licks showing included "Mission Over Turkey," "Last Train from Bombay" and "East of Sumatra." For those already captivated by the early hints of adult programming, Howard Hughes' "Devil's Canyon" was playing in 3-D, advertised as 'Real as Flesh!" UNDERSTAND NOW? An article headlined WVhy We Need a City-wide Revival" explained "people are not attending church as they should." FROM THE CLASSIFIEDS: "Make $75 and up every week taking orders for America's largest selling liq, uid fertilizer..."